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Author Topic: Kindle Scout experiences & Nomination Requests (MERGED)  (Read 1645633 times)  

Offline ID Johnson

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Re: Kindle Scout experiences & Nomination Requests (MERGED)
« Reply #22475 on: November 08, 2017, 09:25:00 PM »
Thanks for the tips guys, but I was checking author shout and readper  and I have a question...who/how do they get readers?  The ENTIRE site is clearly designed just at authors, if I was a reader (the ones WE are trying to get) how would I have ever signed up or benefited from going to those websites?

To be clear, I am not attacking you in the slightest, I am grateful for your tips, this is my critical thinking coming out and my past as a niche website operator which sets off bells when I see similar...techniques...on other websites.
I know Author Shout does a lot of tweeting, and they have their website and Facebook, though I don't know if they have a newsletter. The great thing about Author Shout is the graphics they provide you with. They'll send you a banner and another promo post that you can use anywhere else you like, so that to me was worth the $10. They all look quite professional. For the purposes of gaining exposure for KS, authors are some of the best people you can ask for nominations. They are going to be just as likely to want to vote for you as anyone else. We are also all readers, right?
I have also used Readper and they definitely have a newsletter and very popular website. The owner frequents this thread, and I'm sure he could tell you a lot more than I can if he stops by. Readper definitely boosted my KS campaign and got me onto the hot and trending list.
There are other promos that you can do. Books Butterfly has one as does Genre Pulse (called Scout Boost) and they might also help, but they are a lot more expensive. 

Offline JulianneQJohnson

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Re: Kindle Scout experiences & Nomination Requests (MERGED)
« Reply #22476 on: November 08, 2017, 10:10:14 PM »
Ditto what ID said.  Readper has a huge newsletter.  My last campaign, Readper gave me a 4-day tail on Hot and Trending.  Author Shout does have a reader website and they will post your book there as well as tweet it for 30 days.  For $10 bucks it's worth it.  But the Readper is a steal at $7.50.  It always gives me lots of page views.  And obviously quite a few noms, or I wouldn't hit H&T in the boggy middle bit.
             

Offline Variath

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Re: Kindle Scout experiences & Nomination Requests (MERGED)
« Reply #22477 on: November 08, 2017, 10:42:55 PM »
Just to inform you all that my book "The Peacewoods" now a free download slot on 9th November and 10th November to all KB family. If you like an Indian Romantic, Thriller story with Indian culture, the book is for you and don't forget to leave your valuable review, it will be an asset for me.
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0775RZLRK/

Offline Alan Felyk

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Re: Kindle Scout experiences & Nomination Requests (MERGED)
« Reply #22478 on: November 09, 2017, 12:57:45 AM »
Just heard this on Amazon Music. Seemed damn appropriate after being immersed in a Kindle Scout campaign for more than three weeks.

"I'll never leave the canyon cause I'm surrounded on all sides
By people writing novels and living on amusement rides"

bit.ly/2zsTz1S
« Last Edit: November 09, 2017, 12:59:34 AM by Alan Felyk »

Online Steve Vernon

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Re: Kindle Scout experiences & Nomination Requests (MERGED)
« Reply #22479 on: November 09, 2017, 01:34:06 AM »
It's Thursday.

I'd like to say something brilliantly lucid at this point. I'd like to make you spew up your morning coffee through your nostrils and laugh yourself breathless. I'd like to make you call out for your wife or your husband and say something like "Oh God, you have got to come here and read this. It's so darned funny..."

I'd like to make your cat look at you strangely.

I'd like to make your children look at you as if they are wondering to themselves that maybe - just maybe - their parent's cheese has slipped from their cracker.

Only I can't because I'm just too darned tired.

So insert something funny - RIGHT HERE.

Do it.

Do it now.

Not that. Don't insert that. No one wants to see that.

Just put that away right now, right this very minute - and let's get on with today's list, shall we?

Remember - the campaigns that need nominations the most are the ones that are closest to the LAST DAY LEFT, 1 day left, 2 days left etc.

Updated List

LAST DAY LEFT! When Death Comes For You by Marjorie Florestal
3 days left Deadline by Jewel Allen
7 days left Damaged Beyond All Recognition by Alan Felyk
7 days left Cold Solar by Anthony C. Robinson
7 days left The Game Players of Meridien
7 days left Murder On Perrys Island by J. Kevin Earp
8 days left Tall Chimneys by Allie Cresswell
8 days left 355: A Novel by Kit Sergeant
10 days left Vanished by Dan Petrosini
10 days left Feathered by Rachel Wollaston
14 days left Gray's Ghosts by Carey Lewis
14 days left Haunted by the Devil by Bill Hiatt
14 days left Fluidus Rising by Margo Ryerkerk
15 days left Barrier Rip by Brian Delaney
17 days left Crucible Station by Julianne Q. Johnson
17 days left The Gate Run by Elina Vale
21 days left Folklore by Mitch Sebourn
22 days left Forged by Fire by Michael Arches
28 days left VayneLine - Fate Reset by E.A. Szabelski

I put this list up every morning and I strive to keep it up-to-date so that this thread needn't dissolve into a flurry of "NOMINATE MY BOOK, NOMINATE MY BOOK" posts. No one is under any obligation to nominate any of these books. I'm just trying to keep the thread clear of unnecessary clutter. This way once a day there is a complete list of current candidates and folks can readily check out the kboards members who have a book in the running and can make up their own mind. I try and stay nonpartisan about it - which is why I don't comment on any particular book by title. I just keep the list.
 
If I have missed anyone please let me know either with a PM or by posting a link here in the thread.

Happy scouting, folks!


Offline Alex Makepeace

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Re: Kindle Scout experiences & Nomination Requests (MERGED)
« Reply #22480 on: November 09, 2017, 02:07:05 AM »
Hi all. My novel the Poison People has been accepted by KS and launches tomorrow, I'll let you know when!

I'm happy with the preview, there was just one thing I was wondering - am I shooting myself in the foot by keeping the categories quite tight? These are the ones I've chosen. I guess my main concern is that by saying I'm in British contemporary fiction (well, it is) I'll miss a lot of potential US readers, who I think will be my main audience post-KS. I am a British writer, and the story is mostly set in the UK, but has US characters and settings.

Literature & Fiction    Contemporary Fiction    British
Science Fiction & Fantasy    Science Fiction    Dystopian
Science Fiction & Fantasy    Science Fiction    Post-Apocalyptic

Offline Mark Wakely

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Re: Kindle Scout experiences & Nomination Requests (MERGED)
« Reply #22481 on: November 09, 2017, 05:38:49 AM »
Had three slots open and nominated:

When Death Comes For You by Marjorie Florestal
Deadline by Jewel Allen
Damaged Beyond All Recognition by Alan Felyk

Good luck to all three!

Mark


My novel A Friend Like Filby on Wattpad: https://www.wattpad.com/story/109140386-a-friend-like-filby

Offline Bill Hiatt

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Re: Kindle Scout experiences & Nomination Requests (MERGED)
« Reply #22482 on: November 09, 2017, 06:01:48 AM »
Ditto what ID said.  Readper has a huge newsletter.  My last campaign, Readper gave me a 4-day tail on Hot and Trending.  Author Shout does have a reader website and they will post your book there as well as tweet it for 30 days.  For $10 bucks it's worth it.  But the Readper is a steal at $7.50.  It always gives me lots of page views.  And obviously quite a few noms, or I wouldn't hit H&T in the boggy middle bit.
I'll third that. The day my Readper campaign launched was one of the biggest days I've had so far, second only to the second day of the campaign, at which point my mailing list folks got the word, I started FB advertising, and basically was using every other personal resource I had.

Author Shout is harder to measure because it advertises a lot on FB, and I see a lot of FB hits, though I can't verify that they're all Author Shout. I know there are far more than my ads are generating. The total views from their website also keeps steadily increasing.

To those recs I'll add that Lincoln Cole, one of our resident Kindle Scout experts, is also now offering a reasonably priced Scout promotional service. His push for me doesn't happen until November 13, but I'm already getting hits from his website. I'm going to go out on a limb and say his service will be productive. (I've participated both in cross-promotional anthologies and mailing list builders with him. He is always well-organized and delivers exactly what he says he will.)

In addition, if your book has a YA or NA appeal, I would highly recommend Ripley's Booklist. You can use an author special feature in her newsletter to do a Scout promo. Last time her promotion produced my highest day. This time I had so much other promotion going on that it wasn't my highest day, but it was almost 200 up from the day before, and I got the jump in direct traffic I would expect from a good newsletter campaign. The price is also very reasonable.

I'm trying Scout Boost again because it worked well for me last time. It didn't work well for Lincoln, and it is pricey, so there's that to consider.

 


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Offline RK

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Re: Kindle Scout experiences & Nomination Requests (MERGED)
« Reply #22483 on: November 09, 2017, 06:17:57 AM »
OMG! It happened! I got a giant letter full of editorial feedback to devour on my rejected Scout book and I am over the moon!! To backtrack, my super successful (in terms of stats) campaign ended on 11/04, and by 11/06 I got a quick harsh deadpan NO. I was devastated to be rejected so quickly - instead of a no, it felt more like a $#@! no to me.

I didn't expect to qualify for the new announcement that they're giving feedback in Nov/Dec because mine was originally submitted in October, so I figured that didn't apply. However, I am already a Kindle Press author (my first campaign book was selected) and all the prior winners were talking about how they still got feedback despite the many (many!!) denied campaigns recently for people on their subsequent runs. But yet - all I had in my inbox was a generic no and nothing else to go along with it. Fast forward to this morning, when - I finally received an email with EXTREMELY detailed feedback on my manuscript! Hallelujah!

The gist of what they didn't like/what I can work on: my many dialogue tags (admittedly a crutch of mine) along with repeat useless words like "actually" (hey, I write like I talk, lol - so clearly I need to make my characters speak better than I do IRL) - and they also made some detailed notes on how/why I should've expanded some of my side characters/sub arcs (which I completely agree with). The notes were so detailed that they literally gave me suggestions on even the most mundane/unimportant elements of my story as to how I could improve even on those small things that are otherwise of minor importance, which is of great help overall.   

The "marketing" notes were the part that struck me as a little odd, only because they said my characters were too old to market as a YA book (which is why I don't write YA, my genre is actually "New Adult" - characters 18-26, but they don't have that option in Scout - so I noted 'teen' simply because my books are "clean" unlike so many other romances, yet I think that mislead them into thinking I expected this to be a YA when it is definitely not - it's just simply okay for a younger audience (15+) to read if they like contemporary romance). So a note to take more time/thought on what categories you choose FIRST when selecting them for your submission (I should've picked all the general/contemporary romance categories first before even touching teen, but looking back I think that's the first one I picked for the campaign simply because I saw it first, lol). They loved my cover, but - - weren't crazy about my title. *GASP* - I love my title (like I really, REALLY love it - especially with how it relates to the book) so although I will take every single other suggestion/detail they gave me into account, I'm just really not sure what to do about that - so that may be the one thing I hold my ground on.

Otherwise there were also many, many positives - they loved my characters, the HEA ending, and my copyediting is good (<- that's a big win for me, because I do it myself, lol) - but they compared this book to my last book (about my father dying) and it didn't pack the same emotion punch as that (because let's face it, no other books I write will be as traumatic for me as when my father was actually dying... :'( ) but they gave me some great suggestions as to how to get it closer to that level (which is so very helpful).

So all in all, the feedback was extremely spot on and I agree with almost every single thing they pointed out, which is huge for me to be able to learn and grow from this process. Sorry this post is so long, but I just thought perhaps some of this information may be helpful to the rest of you struggling like me to understand the choices they make and their reasoning for those choices.

I've decided that instead of rushing to self-pub this one (even though I really want to), I am going to make all of their changes and strengthen my book as much as possible based on all of their suggestions (except the title - I just can't do it, it feels like asking me to change my 7 year old son's name at this point, lol) and I will hopefully have a kick-ass launch in January with a much stronger, better book.  ;D

To all of you in the trenches - keep your head up. My "%$#! no" has now turned into more of a "no thank you" (a victory in itself) and hopefully by further working on/improving this book, I can turn it into a "$#%!, wish we would have taken it!" story.  :D

Online Decon

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Re: Kindle Scout experiences & Nomination Requests (MERGED)
« Reply #22484 on: November 09, 2017, 06:48:06 AM »
OMG! It happened! I got a giant letter full of editorial feedback to devour on my rejected Scout book and I am over the moon!! To backtrack, my super successful (in terms of stats) campaign ended on 11/04, and by 11/06 I got a quick harsh deadpan NO. I was devastated to be rejected so quickly - instead of a no, it felt more like a $#@! no to me.

I didn't expect to qualify for the new announcement that they're giving feedback in Nov/Dec because mine was originally submitted in October, so I figured that didn't apply. However, I am already a Kindle Press author (my first campaign book was selected) and all the prior winners were talking about how they still got feedback despite the many (many!!) denied campaigns recently for people on their subsequent runs. But yet - all I had in my inbox was a generic no and nothing else to go along with it. Fast forward to this morning, when - I finally received an email with EXTREMELY detailed feedback on my manuscript! Hallelujah!

The gist of what they didn't like/what I can work on: my many dialogue tags (admittedly a crutch of mine) along with repeat useless words like "actually" (hey, I write like I talk, lol - so clearly I need to make my characters speak better than I do IRL) - and they also made some detailed notes on how/why I should've expanded some of my side characters/sub arcs (which I completely agree with). The notes were so detailed that they literally gave me suggestions on even the most mundane/unimportant elements of my story as to how I could improve even on those small things that are otherwise of minor importance, which is of great help overall.   

The "marketing" notes were the part that struck me as a little odd, only because they said my characters were too old to market as a YA book (which is why I don't write YA, my genre is actually "New Adult" - characters 18-26, but they don't have that option in Scout - so I noted 'teen' simply because my books are "clean" unlike so many other romances, yet I think that mislead them into thinking I expected this to be a YA when it is definitely not - it's just simply okay for a younger audience (15+) to read if they like contemporary romance). So a note to take more time/thought on what categories you choose FIRST when selecting them for your submission (I should've picked all the general/contemporary romance categories first before even touching teen, but looking back I think that's the first one I picked for the campaign simply because I saw it first, lol). They loved my cover, but - - weren't crazy about my title. *GASP* - I love my title (like I really, REALLY love it - especially with how it relates to the book) so although I will take every single other suggestion/detail they gave me into account, I'm just really not sure what to do about that - so that may be the one thing I hold my ground on.

Otherwise there were also many, many positives - they loved my characters, the HEA ending, and my copyediting is good (<- that's a big win for me, because I do it myself, lol) - but they compared this book to my last book (about my father dying) and it didn't pack the same emotion punch as that (because let's face it, no other books I write will be as traumatic for me as when my father was actually dying... :'( ) but they gave me some great suggestions as to how to get it closer to that level (which is so very helpful).

So all in all, the feedback was extremely spot on and I agree with almost every single thing they pointed out, which is huge for me to be able to learn and grow from this process. Sorry this post is so long, but I just thought perhaps some of this information may be helpful to the rest of you struggling like me to understand the choices they make and their reasoning for those choices.

I've decided that instead of rushing to self-pub this one (even though I really want to), I am going to make all of their changes and strengthen my book as much as possible based on all of their suggestions (except the title - I just can't do it, it feels like asking me to change my 7 year old son's name at this point, lol) and I will hopefully have a kick-ass launch in January with a much stronger, better book.  ;D

To all of you in the trenches - keep your head up. My "%$#! no" has now turned into more of a "no thank you" (a victory in itself) and hopefully by further working on/improving this book, I can turn it into a "$#%!, wish we would have taken it!" story.  :D

That's fantastic. I wish they'd have been giving crits when I had my rejection. I noted the genre selection. I'm now thinking it was a mistake to add mine to three catagories. I wont make that mistake again and I'll stick to the main one. Reading some previous comments about some reasons for rejection, I researched the net for common reasons for rejection by literary agents and publishers. The list below is by no means exhaustive, but it's a summary of the most reflective of why stuff gets rejected,

One problem with kindle Scout is that unless you go through a multiple beta reader program before submitting, it's too late after the event to make development edits other than for going ahead and self-publishing. Kindle Scout, besides having a requirement for a quality cover, they have a firm requirement that your MS has an edit prior to submission. Problem with that is that if an author can afford it, the most it will get is a line edit for punctuation and grammar, and if you are lucky, a few pointers that the editor feels need changing, though they aren't obliged to do that with a line edit, or a proof read. The one that would really matter is an in-depth development edit, but the cost of those would be more than the advance and still no guarantee of acceptance for a multitude of reasons.

Here's the list. No doubt that acceptance is a tough one. Before any of this, most are rejected purely on the blurb and maybe an opening para or two, without reading any thing else.

1, The book is slow paced from the off with no hint of the conflict to come. Pacing is off with either too slow, or too fast scenes.


2, The book is over long for the genre and it would cost too much to produce/ the books word count is below expectations for the genre.

3, The book is promising but needs too much development work for available scheduling to be viable. Or it has no recognizable plot. Disjointed transitions from scene to scene chapter to chapter. Too complicated a plot for the reader to absorb what is going on.
 
 4, Needs too much line editing and proofreading.


5, Too many characters for the reader to follow.

6, The writer gives no reason for the reader to care about the character.

7, POV. More than 1 character POVs per scene.

8, Stock characters, limp descriptions, instead of complicated characters. No background or defining moment character needs to change. Too much descriptive weight given to minor characters. poor character development.

9, Preachy types of narrative with too obvious a moral message.

10, The writing is flowery.

11, Too many clichs.

12, The editor has had similar books before that haven't sold.

13, The author has other published books of this type which haven't sold.

14, The author has no, or little in the way of a social media presence.

15, Graphic violence or explicit sex.

16, Too similar to other known stories.

17, It is not what they are looking for at that moment. Or the genre is not clear for expectations.


« Last Edit: November 09, 2017, 07:18:30 AM by Decon »


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Offline VayneLine

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Re: Kindle Scout experiences & Nomination Requests (MERGED)
« Reply #22485 on: November 09, 2017, 07:14:25 AM »
Thanks for the stories that those sites actually helped.  Is there any way to measure how many hits or nominatations I am getting?

I got a few of the ending soon books nominated, really like cold solar.

I write space opera Scifi.  If you like heavy action and deep concepts check out my stuff.
E. A. Szabelski | VayneLine website

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Re: Kindle Scout experiences & Nomination Requests (MERGED)
« Reply #22486 on: November 09, 2017, 07:19:58 AM »
OMG! It happened! I got a giant letter full of editorial feedback to devour on my rejected Scout book and I am over the moon!! To backtrack, my super successful (in terms of stats) campaign ended on 11/04, and by 11/06 I got a quick harsh deadpan NO. I was devastated to be rejected so quickly - instead of a no, it felt more like a $#@! no to me.


That's terrific. I'm sure your book will come out much better by virtue of starting a Scout campaign.

Offline Bill Hiatt

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Re: Kindle Scout experiences & Nomination Requests (MERGED)
« Reply #22487 on: November 09, 2017, 07:42:35 AM »
Thanks for the stories that those sites actually helped.  Is there any way to measure how many hits or nominatations I am getting?

I got a few of the ending soon books nominated, really like cold solar.
You get a record of page views and how many hours in hot and trending each day (updates once every 24 hours). Aside from that, there's no way to know any other stats for sure. It would be useful to know number of nominations, but Scout doesn't reveal that.

Number of page views gives you some idea of how attractive your book is to the Scouting audience. It's hard to maintain page views mid-campaign--that great chasm between recently added and ending soon--unless your book has a lot of first-glance appeal. If it does, and it stays in Hot and Trending, it will attract even more views. It also may give you a rough idea of how big an initial wave of sales you might have at release.


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Offline Bill Hiatt

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Re: Kindle Scout experiences & Nomination Requests (MERGED)
« Reply #22488 on: November 09, 2017, 07:44:54 AM »
OMG! It happened! I got a giant letter full of editorial feedback to devour on my rejected Scout book and I am over the moon!! To backtrack, my super successful (in terms of stats) campaign ended on 11/04, and by 11/06 I got a quick harsh deadpan NO. I was devastated to be rejected so quickly - instead of a no, it felt more like a $#@! no to me.

I didn't expect to qualify for the new announcement that they're giving feedback in Nov/Dec because mine was originally submitted in October, so I figured that didn't apply. However, I am already a Kindle Press author (my first campaign book was selected) and all the prior winners were talking about how they still got feedback despite the many (many!!) denied campaigns recently for people on their subsequent runs. But yet - all I had in my inbox was a generic no and nothing else to go along with it. Fast forward to this morning, when - I finally received an email with EXTREMELY detailed feedback on my manuscript! Hallelujah!

The gist of what they didn't like/what I can work on: my many dialogue tags (admittedly a crutch of mine) along with repeat useless words like "actually" (hey, I write like I talk, lol - so clearly I need to make my characters speak better than I do IRL) - and they also made some detailed notes on how/why I should've expanded some of my side characters/sub arcs (which I completely agree with). The notes were so detailed that they literally gave me suggestions on even the most mundane/unimportant elements of my story as to how I could improve even on those small things that are otherwise of minor importance, which is of great help overall.   

The "marketing" notes were the part that struck me as a little odd, only because they said my characters were too old to market as a YA book (which is why I don't write YA, my genre is actually "New Adult" - characters 18-26, but they don't have that option in Scout - so I noted 'teen' simply because my books are "clean" unlike so many other romances, yet I think that mislead them into thinking I expected this to be a YA when it is definitely not - it's just simply okay for a younger audience (15+) to read if they like contemporary romance). So a note to take more time/thought on what categories you choose FIRST when selecting them for your submission (I should've picked all the general/contemporary romance categories first before even touching teen, but looking back I think that's the first one I picked for the campaign simply because I saw it first, lol). They loved my cover, but - - weren't crazy about my title. *GASP* - I love my title (like I really, REALLY love it - especially with how it relates to the book) so although I will take every single other suggestion/detail they gave me into account, I'm just really not sure what to do about that - so that may be the one thing I hold my ground on.

Otherwise there were also many, many positives - they loved my characters, the HEA ending, and my copyediting is good (<- that's a big win for me, because I do it myself, lol) - but they compared this book to my last book (about my father dying) and it didn't pack the same emotion punch as that (because let's face it, no other books I write will be as traumatic for me as when my father was actually dying... :'( ) but they gave me some great suggestions as to how to get it closer to that level (which is so very helpful).

So all in all, the feedback was extremely spot on and I agree with almost every single thing they pointed out, which is huge for me to be able to learn and grow from this process. Sorry this post is so long, but I just thought perhaps some of this information may be helpful to the rest of you struggling like me to understand the choices they make and their reasoning for those choices.

I've decided that instead of rushing to self-pub this one (even though I really want to), I am going to make all of their changes and strengthen my book as much as possible based on all of their suggestions (except the title - I just can't do it, it feels like asking me to change my 7 year old son's name at this point, lol) and I will hopefully have a kick-ass launch in January with a much stronger, better book.  ;D

To all of you in the trenches - keep your head up. My "%$#! no" has now turned into more of a "no thank you" (a victory in itself) and hopefully by further working on/improving this book, I can turn it into a "$#%!, wish we would have taken it!" story.  :D
I always thought they should give some feedback, but in my wildest dreams, I never imagined they would give that much. I know it's only for November and December, but I kind of hope that's a test and that they may decide to continue it. Revealing something about what they're looking for might very well improve their odds of getting it, after all.


Tickling the imagination one book at a time
Bill Hiatt | fiction website | education website | Facebook author page | Twitter

Offline Bill Hiatt

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Re: Kindle Scout experiences & Nomination Requests (MERGED)
« Reply #22489 on: November 09, 2017, 08:02:00 AM »
One problem with kindle Scout is that unless you go through a multiple beta reader program before submitting, it's too late after the event to make development edits other than for going ahead and self-publishing. Kindle Scout, besides having a requirement for a quality cover, they have a firm requirement that your MS has an edit prior to submission. Problem with that is that if an author can afford it, the most it will get is a line edit for punctuation and grammar, and if you are lucky, a few pointers that the editor feels need changing, though they aren't obliged to do that with a line edit, or a proof read. The one that would really matter is an in-depth development edit, but the cost of those would be more than the advance and still no guarantee of acceptance for a multitude of reasons.
The feedback has been interesting. So far, we've seen one book rejected primarily because of the cover (Lincoln's), and two rejected for things that sound like fine-tuning. I'm a little surprised that scenarios like that don't produce an invitation to fix and resubmit. It's not exactly as if they have more absolutely flawless manuscripts than they can handle.

I know they require at least one round of editing prior to submission, but as you say, one round isn't going to catch everything. I noticed earlier that some authors were reporting not just one round of editing after selection, but three or four in some cases, so clearly the editors don't think every manuscript they put out is flawless.

All of that said, I'm perfectly happy to self-publish in the likely event that I'm rejected. If I get feedback that will help me improve the book, all the better. The system may not be exactly what I'd want, but it's still a lot better than most trad publishing processes.


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Offline PraytorAZ

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Mass Primary launched 11/8
« Reply #22490 on: November 09, 2017, 08:10:57 AM »
MASS PRIMARY (Dark Landing Series book 2) launched yesterday! Science fiction and fantasy; mystery thriller; adventure

The first book in the series, TRANSMUTED (my debut novel) was selected last year. If they don't select book 2, I'm more than a little concerned about how to market the series when I have no control over pricing/leverage of the first book. Has anyone else experienced this?

Please nominate MASS PRIMARY--I need all the help I can get! Thanks.  https://kindlescout.amazon.com/p/2DGR84RNEU107

TRANSMUTED was selected for publication through the Kindle Scout program.
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Re: Kindle Scout experiences & Nomination Requests (MERGED)
« Reply #22491 on: November 09, 2017, 08:18:49 AM »
The feedback has been interesting. So far, we've seen one book rejected primarily because of the cover (Lincoln's), and two rejected for things that sound like fine-tuning. I'm a little surprised that scenarios like that don't produce an invitation to fix and resubmit. It's not exactly as if they have more absolutely flawless manuscripts than they can handle.

I know they require at least one round of editing prior to submission, but as you say, one round isn't going to catch everything. I noticed earlier that some authors were reporting not just one round of editing after selection, but three or four in some cases, so clearly the editors don't think every manuscript they put out is flawless.

All of that said, I'm perfectly happy to self-publish in the likely event that I'm rejected. If I get feedback that will help me improve the book, all the better. The system may not be exactly what I'd want, but it's still a lot better than most trad publishing processes.

Agree 100%.

I'm on round two with Kindle Scout and am preparing myself for rejection yet again, and that's okay. This is a different sort of process that gets you exposure and, potentially, feedback.  And it's over and done with in a little over a month.

That's a lot more than I can say for the traditional method of submitting to agents and publishers and waiting weeks or months just to get a photocopy of a form rejection. 

I'll continue to submit all my novel-length works to Kindle Scout until they make me stop.  Granted, I work two jobs and average one novel per year, so that's not saying a whole lot. But hey.  8)

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Re: Kindle Scout experiences & Nomination Requests (MERGED)
« Reply #22492 on: November 09, 2017, 08:41:53 AM »
The "marketing" notes were the part that struck me as a little odd, only because they said my characters were too old to market as a YA book (which is why I don't write YA, my genre is actually "New Adult" - characters 18-26, but they don't have that option in Scout
Just for future reference, it's true that New Adult is not one of their major genre tags, but a New Adult choice does show up among subgenres. Here's what my current campaign looks like:
Science Fiction & Fantasy    Fantasy    New Adult & College
Science Fiction & Fantasy    Fantasy    Paranormal & Urban    Urban


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Offline Bill Hiatt

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Re: Kindle Scout experiences & Nomination Requests (MERGED)
« Reply #22493 on: November 09, 2017, 08:43:32 AM »
Agree 100%.

I'm on round two with Kindle Scout and am preparing myself for rejection yet again, and that's okay. This is a different sort of process that gets you exposure and, potentially, feedback.  And it's over and done with in a little over a month.

That's a lot more than I can say for the traditional method of submitting to agents and publishers and waiting weeks or months just to get a photocopy of a form rejection. 

I'll continue to submit all my novel-length works to Kindle Scout until they make me stop.  Granted, I work two jobs and average one novel per year, so that's not saying a whole lot. But hey.  8)
Two jobs? Under those circumstances, a novel a year is the best most people could do.


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Offline jaxonreed

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Re: Kindle Scout experiences & Nomination Requests (MERGED)
« Reply #22494 on: November 09, 2017, 08:52:26 AM »
I have also used Readper and they definitely have a newsletter and very popular website. The owner frequents this thread, and I'm sure he could tell you a lot more than I can if he stops by. Readper definitely boosted my KS campaign and got me onto the hot and trending list.

Happy to comment and answer any other questions.

Readper subscribers prefer bargains and freebies like other subscribers at other sites, but they have been known to buy higher priced books if they are appealing. We're involved in a variety of subscriber magnets, and we offer swag to our subscribers. They have been very responsive to Scout once they understood what it was about, and I'd like to think we're at least partly responsible for the higher number of Scout nominators these days.

Jaxon Reed | jaxonreed.com | readper.com

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Re: Mass Primary launched 11/8
« Reply #22495 on: November 09, 2017, 09:03:58 AM »
MASS PRIMARY (Dark Landing Series book 2) launched yesterday! Science fiction and fantasy; mystery thriller; adventure

The first book in the series, TRANSMUTED (my debut novel) was selected last year. If they don't select book 2, I'm more than a little concerned about how to market the series when I have no control over pricing/leverage of the first book. Has anyone else experienced this?

Please nominate MASS PRIMARY--I need all the help I can get! Thanks.  https://kindlescout.amazon.com/p/2DGR84RNEU107

You can handle this a couple of ways. One that seems to work well is to write a side-tale or prequel, then you have control over pricing for a book that allows firm entry into the series.

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Re: Mass Primary launched 11/8
« Reply #22496 on: November 09, 2017, 09:12:38 AM »
You can handle this a couple of ways. One that seems to work well is to write a side-tale or prequel, then you have control over pricing for a book that allows firm entry into the series.
That's a clever idea--outflank book 1 with book 0. The only problem might be when KP offers a $0.99 promo on book 1. At that point, you need to be able to promote the KP book. Will promoters be willing to accept both book 0 and book 1 as potential first books in the same series?


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Offline Dan Petrosini author

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Re: Kindle Scout experiences & Nomination Requests (MERGED)
« Reply #22497 on: November 09, 2017, 10:06:58 AM »
I'll third that. The day my Readper campaign launched was one of the biggest days I've had so far, second only to the second day of the campaign, at which point my mailing list folks got the word, I started FB advertising, and basically was using every other personal resource I had.

Author Shout is harder to measure because it advertises a lot on FB, and I see a lot of FB hits, though I can't verify that they're all Author Shout. I know there are far more than my ads are generating. The total views from their website also keeps steadily increasing.

To those recs I'll add that Lincoln Cole, one of our resident Kindle Scout experts, is also now offering a reasonably priced Scout promotional service. His push for me doesn't happen until November 13, but I'm already getting hits from his website. I'm going to go out on a limb and say his service will be productive. (I've participated both in cross-promotional anthologies and mailing list builders with him. He is always well-organized and delivers exactly what he says he will.)

In addition, if your book has a YA or NA appeal, I would highly recommend Ripley's Booklist. You can use an author special feature in her newsletter to do a Scout promo. Last time her promotion produced my highest day. This time I had so much other promotion going on that it wasn't my highest day, but it was almost 200 up from the day before, and I got the jump in direct traffic I would expect from a good newsletter campaign. The price is also very reasonable.

I'm trying Scout Boost again because it worked well for me last time. It didn't work well for Lincoln, and it is pricey, so there's that to consider.

 

No soggy middle for you Bill,  Everyday your book is H&T  Good luck Dan

My work in progress: 40%
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Re: Kindle Scout experiences & Nomination Requests (MERGED)
« Reply #22498 on: November 09, 2017, 10:13:56 AM »
OMG! It happened! I got a giant letter full of editorial feedback to devour on my rejected Scout book and I am over the moon!! To backtrack, my super successful (in terms of stats) campaign ended on 11/04, and by 11/06 I got a quick harsh deadpan NO. I was devastated to be rejected so quickly - instead of a no, it felt more like a $#@! no to me.

I didn't expect to qualify for the new announcement that they're giving feedback in Nov/Dec because mine was originally submitted in October, so I figured that didn't apply. However, I am already a Kindle Press author (my first campaign book was selected) and all the prior winners were talking about how they still got feedback despite the many (many!!) denied campaigns recently for people on their subsequent runs. But yet - all I had in my inbox was a generic no and nothing else to go along with it. Fast forward to this morning, when - I finally received an email with EXTREMELY detailed feedback on my manuscript! Hallelujah!

The gist of what they didn't like/what I can work on: my many dialogue tags (admittedly a crutch of mine) along with repeat useless words like "actually" (hey, I write like I talk, lol - so clearly I need to make my characters speak better than I do IRL) - and they also made some detailed notes on how/why I should've expanded some of my side characters/sub arcs (which I completely agree with). The notes were so detailed that they literally gave me suggestions on even the most mundane/unimportant elements of my story as to how I could improve even on those small things that are otherwise of minor importance, which is of great help overall.   

The "marketing" notes were the part that struck me as a little odd, only because they said my characters were too old to market as a YA book (which is why I don't write YA, my genre is actually "New Adult" - characters 18-26, but they don't have that option in Scout - so I noted 'teen' simply because my books are "clean" unlike so many other romances, yet I think that mislead them into thinking I expected this to be a YA when it is definitely not - it's just simply okay for a younger audience (15+) to read if they like contemporary romance). So a note to take more time/thought on what categories you choose FIRST when selecting them for your submission (I should've picked all the general/contemporary romance categories first before even touching teen, but looking back I think that's the first one I picked for the campaign simply because I saw it first, lol). They loved my cover, but - - weren't crazy about my title. *GASP* - I love my title (like I really, REALLY love it - especially with how it relates to the book) so although I will take every single other suggestion/detail they gave me into account, I'm just really not sure what to do about that - so that may be the one thing I hold my ground on.

Otherwise there were also many, many positives - they loved my characters, the HEA ending, and my copyediting is good (<- that's a big win for me, because I do it myself, lol) - but they compared this book to my last book (about my father dying) and it didn't pack the same emotion punch as that (because let's face it, no other books I write will be as traumatic for me as when my father was actually dying... :'( ) but they gave me some great suggestions as to how to get it closer to that level (which is so very helpful).

So all in all, the feedback was extremely spot on and I agree with almost every single thing they pointed out, which is huge for me to be able to learn and grow from this process. Sorry this post is so long, but I just thought perhaps some of this information may be helpful to the rest of you struggling like me to understand the choices they make and their reasoning for those choices.

I've decided that instead of rushing to self-pub this one (even though I really want to), I am going to make all of their changes and strengthen my book as much as possible based on all of their suggestions (except the title - I just can't do it, it feels like asking me to change my 7 year old son's name at this point, lol) and I will hopefully have a kick-ass launch in January with a much stronger, better book.  ;D

To all of you in the trenches - keep your head up. My "%$#! no" has now turned into more of a "no thank you" (a victory in itself) and hopefully by further working on/improving this book, I can turn it into a "$#%!, wish we would have taken it!" story.  :D


Thank you for sharing the information. Agree, take the critique seriously and make the changes you believe do not compromise your idea. Good Luck Dan

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Offline RachelWollaston

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Re: Kindle Scout experiences & Nomination Requests (MERGED)
« Reply #22499 on: November 09, 2017, 11:26:08 AM »
OMG! It happened! I got a giant letter full of editorial feedback to devour on my rejected Scout book and I am over the moon!! To backtrack, my super successful (in terms of stats) campaign ended on 11/04, and by 11/06 I got a quick harsh deadpan NO. I was devastated to be rejected so quickly - instead of a no, it felt more like a $#@! no to me.

I didn't expect to qualify for the new announcement that they're giving feedback in Nov/Dec because mine was originally submitted in October, so I figured that didn't apply. However, I am already a Kindle Press author (my first campaign book was selected) and all the prior winners were talking about how they still got feedback despite the many (many!!) denied campaigns recently for people on their subsequent runs. But yet - all I had in my inbox was a generic no and nothing else to go along with it. Fast forward to this morning, when - I finally received an email with EXTREMELY detailed feedback on my manuscript! Hallelujah!

The gist of what they didn't like/what I can work on: my many dialogue tags (admittedly a crutch of mine) along with repeat useless words like "actually" (hey, I write like I talk, lol - so clearly I need to make my characters speak better than I do IRL) - and they also made some detailed notes on how/why I should've expanded some of my side characters/sub arcs (which I completely agree with). The notes were so detailed that they literally gave me suggestions on even the most mundane/unimportant elements of my story as to how I could improve even on those small things that are otherwise of minor importance, which is of great help overall.   

The "marketing" notes were the part that struck me as a little odd, only because they said my characters were too old to market as a YA book (which is why I don't write YA, my genre is actually "New Adult" - characters 18-26, but they don't have that option in Scout - so I noted 'teen' simply because my books are "clean" unlike so many other romances, yet I think that mislead them into thinking I expected this to be a YA when it is definitely not - it's just simply okay for a younger audience (15+) to read if they like contemporary romance). So a note to take more time/thought on what categories you choose FIRST when selecting them for your submission (I should've picked all the general/contemporary romance categories first before even touching teen, but looking back I think that's the first one I picked for the campaign simply because I saw it first, lol). They loved my cover, but - - weren't crazy about my title. *GASP* - I love my title (like I really, REALLY love it - especially with how it relates to the book) so although I will take every single other suggestion/detail they gave me into account, I'm just really not sure what to do about that - so that may be the one thing I hold my ground on.

Otherwise there were also many, many positives - they loved my characters, the HEA ending, and my copyediting is good (<- that's a big win for me, because I do it myself, lol) - but they compared this book to my last book (about my father dying) and it didn't pack the same emotion punch as that (because let's face it, no other books I write will be as traumatic for me as when my father was actually dying... :'( ) but they gave me some great suggestions as to how to get it closer to that level (which is so very helpful).

So all in all, the feedback was extremely spot on and I agree with almost every single thing they pointed out, which is huge for me to be able to learn and grow from this process. Sorry this post is so long, but I just thought perhaps some of this information may be helpful to the rest of you struggling like me to understand the choices they make and their reasoning for those choices.

I've decided that instead of rushing to self-pub this one (even though I really want to), I am going to make all of their changes and strengthen my book as much as possible based on all of their suggestions (except the title - I just can't do it, it feels like asking me to change my 7 year old son's name at this point, lol) and I will hopefully have a kick-ass launch in January with a much stronger, better book.  ;D

To all of you in the trenches - keep your head up. My "%$#! no" has now turned into more of a "no thank you" (a victory in itself) and hopefully by further working on/improving this book, I can turn it into a "$#%!, wish we would have taken it!" story.  :D

Thats fantastic news!!! I really hope they carry this on because it seems to be benefitting a LOT of writers!!
Thanks for sharing some of your feedback! Really insightful. Good luck with your launch, whatever you decide to do! :D


Rachel Wollaston | YA/Fantasy author

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