Author Topic: LGBT Authors Support Thread  (Read 27439 times)  

Offline Robert Dahlen

  • Status: Scheherazade
  • *****
  • Posts: 1257
  • Gender: Male
  • Acme Labs
  • Thank you, Harvey.
    • View Profile
    • Monkey Queen Books
Re: LGBT Authors Support Thread
« Reply #50 on: October 12, 2015, 11:29:13 AM »
Two pages in, and I'm still conflicted over whether this thread is "for me", as a lesbian writer of mostly M/F relationships.
I'm also conflicted about that, as I'm a straight male writing a fantasy series that has, as a key story arc, a slowly developing F/F relationship between the two main characters. But then again...
This! Yes, exactly - I vastly prefer the "here is the hero doing heroic things and oh, hey, they happen to be gay" model rather than defining characters by their sexuality. The first is what I relate to, the second tends to be either depressing or boring.
[points down to signature and hopes you like adventure fantasy :) ]
« Last Edit: October 12, 2015, 11:47:28 AM by Robert Dahlen »
Fantasy novelist, all-around wisecracker and penguin aficionado. Need some fantasy adventure with heroines, humor and heart, and a touch of romance? Skyblade's Gambit and Book Fair Frenzy available exclusively at Amazon! Get all the Monkey Queen e-books at Amazon and other ebook retailers! Find previews, cover art, short stories and much more at the blog or the website!
Robert Dahlen | Blog | Website | Amazon Central | Willow the cover artist! | Avatar by Calomiel!

Online Mercia McMahon

  • Status: Dostoevsky
  • ******
  • Posts: 3622
  • Gender: Female
  • London
  • living in the Shadow of pulp speed
    • View Profile
    • Mercia McMahon
Re: LGBT Authors Support Thread
« Reply #51 on: October 12, 2015, 11:44:19 AM »
Well, I can tell you that I'm with your friend's cousin, and I'll look forward to seeing a book where being gay is a character trait and not the defining point of the MC and his story.

I highly recommend Jonathan Kellerman's best-selling Alex Delaware series. Alex is straight but his LAPD detective buddy Milo Sturgis is gay and in a long-term relationship. I think it was one of the first depictions of a serving US cop who happened to be gay and it did nothing to stop the mega-sales of the Delaware series. Even more startling the book series was launched just as the AIDS pandemic was hitting California hard and LA had no known gay detectives.

Quote
What inspired you to make Milo Sturgis, Delaware's partner in crime solving, a gay homicide detective?
I wish I could say it was some great sensitivity on my part. I never liked the notion of an amateur detective coming in and showing up the cops. I felt a psychologist who worked with cops was much more plausible. Once I figured that out I knew I had to have a policeman in the story and I wanted to avoid the boring clich of the gruff, grizzled veteran detective. This was back in 1981 and I knew the LAPD officially had no gay officers. So I thought making Milo gay would create a certain amount of tension. Ironically, one of the guys who wants to be the next police chief here is a gay, Jewish associate chief. That shows how far things have come at the LAPD. But back then a gay homicide detective was a revolutionary concept and certainly played against stereotype. For the same reason I had Delaware's first girlfriend working with power tools while he was the one dealing with emotions. What interests me in the world are the exceptions rather than the norm.
https://www.bookbrowse.com/author_interviews/full/index.cfm/author_number/256/jonathan-kellerman


no longer writing political works (for work reasons)
Mercia McMahon | Author Site | Publishing Site | Pinterest

Offline PDSinger

  • Status: Madeleine L'Engle
  • **
  • Posts: 57
    • View Profile
Re: LGBT Authors Support Thread
« Reply #52 on: October 12, 2015, 12:23:20 PM »
I'll happily come in and play with you guys. My main work is m/m, and while I write a strong romantic arc, I am generally interested in questions beyond the couple. I'm definitely interested in couple questions beyond the coming out. I've written that and it's done well, but that's certainly not the only thing I want to write. This has resulted in some critical brickbats, but oh well. It's also resulted in in some kudos. My primary readership is female, but I get most of my direct fan mail from the guys, who all seemed surprised I'm female and married to a guy. I suppose it stretches all our boundaries.

Someone upthread mentioned pricing: I launched a book at 99 cents, intending to come roaring out of the gate and then remove the preorder price. That's been happening slower than I'd like: I have to hold off on Amazon until the rest of the slowpokes have populated. (hint: opportunity for an otter shifter book). I price my indie work comparably to my Dreamspinner work, because I put out an equally professional product and I don't want to undercut my other books.

Offline Briteka

  • Status: Arthur C Clarke
  • *****
  • Posts: 2073
    • View Profile
Re: LGBT Authors Support Thread
« Reply #53 on: October 12, 2015, 02:30:35 PM »

I have a question that might help to start things off. I've been wondering about all the books I see launching in LGBT Fantasy at 5-6$ that seem to be doing really well. Do you find that we can price higher due to being in a niche market? Someone over on Mark Dawson's Facebook group suggested that my books were underpriced due to being in a niche market that would pay more for them and it got me wondering considering that there are so many books in the top list for LGBT Fantasy that are selling well despite being priced significantly higher than the typical $0.99-$2.99 range for a debut novel/first in series.  Just curious what other people's experience with this is?


It's funny you ask this. I just launched an Urban Fantasy gay series, and truthfully, I copied your pricing. :P It was the first time I've ever written gay fantasy, and I really didn't know what to do. I noticed that a lot of books were priced at $4.99+, and I actually changed my pricing several times a day for the first week, which is a foolish mistake, since I didn't actually give anything long enough to test. I *think* what I'm going to do is keep book 1 at $2.99 and have the rest of the series at $4.99 while they remain in KU. Once I go out of KU, the first will be permafree, the second will be $2.99 and the rest will be $4.99.

Offline AveryCockburn

  • Status: Lewis Carroll
  • **
  • Posts: 234
    • View Profile
    • Avery Cockburn - Glasgow Lads series
Re: LGBT Authors Support Thread
« Reply #54 on: October 12, 2015, 02:51:34 PM »
It does seem that, for whatever reason, books with coming-out struggles or "first-time" themes have the largest audiences. I think many crossover readers from M/F romance are more receptive to familiar narratives. Because of the fight for equal rights, the aspect of LGBT life that the average straight person is most familiar with is The Struggle. Angsty stories pull at heartstrings and awaken readers' sympathy. There's nothing wrong with that.

But while those are important stories to tell, one of the reasons I started writing in this genre was to tell different stories, ones in which being gay is an intrinsic part of who the characters are*, but the biggest issues in their lives are something else entirely: class differences, economic struggles, cultural divides, etc.

Believe me, LGBT fiction has come a looooooooong way. When I first started reading it in the late 90s, everyone always died at the end.  ;)

*No one just "happens to be LGBT" any more than one happens to be a minority of any sort. Sexuality and romantic feelings are a huge part of being human, not to mention the fact that society treats people differently. Obviously not every character needs to be defined by it or angst endlessly over it, but to treat a contemporary (or historical earth) character's sexuality as if it doesn't matter is akin to white-washing.

Avery Cockburn | Twitter | Tumblr

Offline TheLemontree

  • Status: Scheherazade
  • *****
  • Posts: 1004
  • Gender: Female
  • New Zealand
    • View Profile
Re: LGBT Authors Support Thread
« Reply #55 on: October 12, 2015, 03:36:46 PM »
As a bi woman in a very happy monogamous het marriage, I love stumbling across lgbt characters in my reading.

I'd read more if they were easier to find. Like others have said, I prefer my story arcs in the non romance genres (mysteries, historical fic, steampunkish fantasy/science fic) with the relationships being important but secondary.

I did recently find one series through either bookbub or ereaderiq (can't remember which). The main character is a forensic archaeologist whose partner is a cop. Both men.  The Luke Littlefield mysteries by Stephen E Stanley.

I'll happily read m/m, m/f, or f/f.

Stacey Wilson | Kombucha Research

Offline AixenPixel

  • Status: Jane Austen
  • ***
  • Posts: 264
  • Gender: Female
  • Zelena Zucci <3
    • View Profile
Re: LGBT Authors Support Thread
« Reply #56 on: October 12, 2015, 03:59:37 PM »
I already find men hot, so as a female, mm stories make my ovaries implode then explode. Writing it is fun as well! I have a MM space opera romance series in the making!
Men seem  to have very good relationships already (platonic) so to see it as romance or smut or even write it is refreshing from the usual f/m.

Where has imagination taken you lately?
Zelena Zucci

Offline Dragovian

  • Status: Arthur Conan Doyle
  • ****
  • Posts: 781
  • Gender: Female
    • View Profile
Re: LGBT Authors Support Thread
« Reply #57 on: October 12, 2015, 04:09:47 PM »
*No one just "happens to be LGBT" any more than one happens to be a minority of any sort. Sexuality and romantic feelings are a huge part of being human, not to mention the fact that society treats people differently. Obviously not every character needs to be defined by it or angst endlessly over it, but to treat a contemporary (or historical earth) character's sexuality as if it doesn't matter is akin to white-washing.
If you asked me to describe myself, "Lesbian" doesn't even make the top 5. Possibly not the top 10. If you want to accuse me of straightwashing when I write characters from my own experience, that's your prerogative, of course.


I've doubled my writing speed by playing on 4theWords. Come give it a try! My referral code is PFXBS32680.

Offline HMeloche

  • Status: Dr. Seuss
  • *
  • Posts: 22
  • Gender: Female
  • Maryland
    • View Profile
Re: LGBT Authors Support Thread
« Reply #58 on: October 12, 2015, 04:11:55 PM »
*No one just "happens to be LGBT" any more than one happens to be a minority of any sort. Sexuality and romantic feelings are a huge part of being human, not to mention the fact that society treats people differently. Obviously not every character needs to be defined by it or angst endlessly over it, but to treat a contemporary (or historical earth) character's sexuality as if it doesn't matter is akin to white-washing.

We're going to have to agree to disagree on that one - I find the way it's portrayed in most media which strives to not make it "happens to be LGBT" to be overblown bordering on stereotyping. I enjoy characters where their sexuality is a secondary point to everything else they are to be more enjoyable.

HOWEVER - that said, I read down and find the difference of opinion may stem from "contemporary (or historical earth)" because I don't ever read contemporary fiction if I can help it. Thumbs up for fantasy and sci-fi, where the rules are made up and don't have to conform to the same hum drum we live every day! ;)

Offline AveryCockburn

  • Status: Lewis Carroll
  • **
  • Posts: 234
    • View Profile
    • Avery Cockburn - Glasgow Lads series
Re: LGBT Authors Support Thread
« Reply #59 on: October 12, 2015, 04:44:31 PM »
We're going to have to agree to disagree on that one - I find the way it's portrayed in most media which strives to not make it "happens to be LGBT" to be overblown bordering on stereotyping. I enjoy characters where their sexuality is a secondary point to everything else they are to be more enjoyable.

HOWEVER - that said, I read down and find the difference of opinion may stem from "contemporary (or historical earth)" because I don't ever read contemporary fiction if I can help it. Thumbs up for fantasy and sci-fi, where the rules are made up and don't have to conform to the same hum drum we live every day! ;)

I actually don't think we disagree. I think we'd both argue that there's a huge middle ground to be explored between stereotyping and straight-washing, and we're both writing stories in that ground. And yes, by specifying "contemporary or historical earth" I was intentionally setting aside sf/f, which has more freedom to explore cultures with different rules.

If you asked me to describe myself, "Lesbian" doesn't even make the top 5. Possibly not the top 10. If you want to accuse me of straightwashing when I write characters from my own experience, that's your prerogative, of course.

Sorry, that was not at all my intention. I said straightwashing occurs when we treat sexuality as if it doesn't matter, which is not the same as putting it farther down the list of important characteristics. As I mention above, I think we're all on the same side here, wanting stories that neither stereotype nor straightwash.

I think what really matters is that the characters are true to their worlds.

Avery Cockburn | Twitter | Tumblr

Offline Dragovian

  • Status: Arthur Conan Doyle
  • ****
  • Posts: 781
  • Gender: Female
    • View Profile
Re: LGBT Authors Support Thread
« Reply #60 on: October 12, 2015, 05:05:12 PM »
Sorry, that was not at all my intention. I said straightwashing occurs when we treat sexuality as if it doesn't matter, which is not the same as putting it farther down the list of important characteristics. As I mention above, I think we're all on the same side here, wanting stories that neither stereotype nor straightwash.

I think what really matters is that the characters are true to their worlds.
I think this is just a natural hazard of assuming any kind of universal experience, because if you asked me, I'd describe myself as a female writer, geek, gamer, and cat-owner, who, yes, just happens to be a lesbian. Mileage varies, of course.


I've doubled my writing speed by playing on 4theWords. Come give it a try! My referral code is PFXBS32680.

Offline AveryCockburn

  • Status: Lewis Carroll
  • **
  • Posts: 234
    • View Profile
    • Avery Cockburn - Glasgow Lads series
Re: LGBT Authors Support Thread
« Reply #61 on: October 12, 2015, 05:16:01 PM »
I think this is just a natural hazard of assuming any kind of universal experience, because if you asked me, I'd describe myself as a female writer, geek, gamer, and cat-owner, who, yes, just happens to be a lesbian. Mileage varies, of course.

Which begs a potentially more interesting discussion--completely aside from genre--about how much of ourselves and our own experiences we put into our characters. There's no right or wrong answer, obviously. When I was younger my fiction was much more autobiographical, but I discovered that having a blessedly boring life meant I needed to start inventing more interesting people pronto.  :D

Avery Cockburn | Twitter | Tumblr

Offline Dragovian

  • Status: Arthur Conan Doyle
  • ****
  • Posts: 781
  • Gender: Female
    • View Profile
Re: LGBT Authors Support Thread
« Reply #62 on: October 12, 2015, 05:23:09 PM »
Which begs a potentially more interesting discussion--completely aside from genre--about how much of ourselves and our own experiences we put into our characters. There's no right or wrong answer, obviously. When I was younger my fiction was much more autobiographical, but I discovered that having a blessedly boring life meant I needed to start inventing more interesting people pronto.  :D
Questions of character development aside, I was responding specifically to
*No one just "happens to be LGBT" any more than one happens to be a minority of any sort.


I've doubled my writing speed by playing on 4theWords. Come give it a try! My referral code is PFXBS32680.

Offline AveryCockburn

  • Status: Lewis Carroll
  • **
  • Posts: 234
    • View Profile
    • Avery Cockburn - Glasgow Lads series
Re: LGBT Authors Support Thread
« Reply #63 on: October 12, 2015, 05:42:53 PM »
Questions of character development aside, I was responding specifically to

I know. I was under the impression we'd moved on after I said "Sorry" and clarified my point. I was neither ignoring nor negating your argument or experience, but rather attempting to steer the discussion in a less contentious direction. I'll step away now. Have a good night.

Avery Cockburn | Twitter | Tumblr

Offline YudronWangmo

  • Status: Dr. Seuss
  • *
  • Posts: 42
  • Gender: Female
  • Sunny California
    • View Profile
    • Yudron Wangmo
Re: LGBT Authors Support Thread
« Reply #64 on: October 12, 2015, 06:21:04 PM »
It's like a credit report. Seven years and it slides off :)

I'd definitely put that in teen/LGBT. It sounds great.

Yeah, the queer accreditation bureau is strict that way.

Thanks for my interest in my quirky books.  The first in the series will be out in a few days.

Inspiring teens
Yudron Wangmo | vlog

Offline HSh

  • Status: Arthur C Clarke
  • *****
  • Posts: 2072
  • Homicide, She Typed
  • Manslaughter, She Inscribed
    • View Profile
Re: LGBT Authors Support Thread
« Reply #65 on: October 12, 2015, 06:52:10 PM »
Which begs a potentially more interesting discussion--completely aside from genre--about how much of ourselves and our own experiences we put into our characters. There's no right or wrong answer, obviously.

Personally, I put a lot of myself into my stories, but it's the feelings rather than more concrete details.  I rarely use details from my life.

I wrote this in a blog entry once, and I think it still holds true, at least for me:

Quote
Take the things that hurt you, and turn them into stories.  Take your deepest pain and tears and the things you've learned the hard way in life, and put them into your stories.  It's the hardest and best thing you can do for your writingto make it deeply personal.  Nobody will actually recognize the parts that are about you, but you will always knowand that can make it terrifying to put your work out there.  But it can also make your stories matter more and mean more.

I'm generally a fluffy, happy ending sort of writer, because I use my fiction to escape tough things in real life, and to deal with things, sometimes.  It's physically and emotionally healthy for me, I think.  :-)


Hollis Shiloh  | My blog | Amazon page

Offline HSh

  • Status: Arthur C Clarke
  • *****
  • Posts: 2072
  • Homicide, She Typed
  • Manslaughter, She Inscribed
    • View Profile
Re: LGBT Authors Support Thread
« Reply #66 on: October 12, 2015, 06:55:38 PM »
Let me bring up another topic I think is useful to any writer, especially of one genre.

SERIES

I think it's one of the best think you can do for your writing career, to have a universe or set of characters or friends you publish several stories about. 

It gives you so many more chances to get visibility and find people who want to read your stuff.  If you have a successful promo for one of the stories, you can find a bunch of new readers who might just go and read every other story in the series.  And readers like series stories, too, especially if they can stand alone.  (At least that's my impression.)

I wrote some gay romance steampunk mystery stuff, and let's face it, that's not a hugely sought after genre.   :-*  But because I was enjoying myself, I wrote several stories in that world, some with the same characters, and linked them.  It did much better as a series--and still has a chance to do well again if I ever add more to the series or promote it heavily.

It's something to think about.  :-D
« Last Edit: October 12, 2015, 06:57:23 PM by HSh »

Hollis Shiloh  | My blog | Amazon page

Offline Shei Darksbane

  • Status: Scheherazade
  • *****
  • Posts: 1299
  • Gender: Female
  • Anywhere but here.
  • Shei Darksbane
    • View Profile
    • Sign up for my mailing list! Please? :D
Re: LGBT Authors Support Thread
« Reply #67 on: October 12, 2015, 06:57:34 PM »
It's funny you ask this. I just launched an Urban Fantasy gay series, and truthfully, I copied your pricing. :P It was the first time I've ever written gay fantasy, and I really didn't know what to do. I noticed that a lot of books were priced at $4.99+, and I actually changed my pricing several times a day for the first week, which is a foolish mistake, since I didn't actually give anything long enough to test. I *think* what I'm going to do is keep book 1 at $2.99 and have the rest of the series at $4.99 while they remain in KU. Once I go out of KU, the first will be permafree, the second will be $2.99 and the rest will be $4.99.
Holy crap really?? Someone copied me? :D
I'm just going to flip out for a moment over that. lol. That must mean it at least LOOKS like I know what I'm doing! :)
I do my best to take advice from people here who are doing well and then just do what they do on pricing and marketing etc.
There was a time when I was deciding my final launch price and I was so torn between launching book1 at 99c and 2.99. I had read advice from four people I highly respected on this board who all wrote either in my genre (well UF, not gay) or close.
I finally decided to go with the advice of the one of them who had the most success herself. Just because something had to decide it for me...and well, she WAS doing the best for herself, so I followed her plan. :) Beyond that, it was kinda what wifey and I wanted to do.. going with 2.99 for launch.  It worked surprisingly well and Awakened stuck high in LGBT fantasy ever since. I promote to 99c when it starts slipping, and I keep it up as high as possible. :)

For the rest, I've started pushing stuff higher. Hunted is 3.99 now and it hasn't slowed from its sales levels during the 2.99 pricing.


Anyway, I do think this strategy works. I just can't help wondering if higher prices also work since I see so much of that in the toplist.



To answer a few other things that have come up here:

1. Yes, LGBT authors who don't write it are welcome here :)
2. I am proof that F/F has a market and can sell well. I think maybe what I'm writing is specifically a thing people want to see more of: Good stories. And oh look, the MC is a lesbian and has a lesbian love interest. Not "Oh and then the lesbians go back to their boyfriends" or "And there's a lesbian, no really, she's there. We never show her with a girl, but she's there." Or just erotica. Or such. I know I wanted these kinds of stories where the main character just happens to be a lesbian and so I'm writing that, and it turns out that I'm not the only person who wanted those stories. :)
3. Someone mentioned Poly... Yeah there's poly stuff in my books. :) I'm poly myself and I wanted to represent that as well because we see almost NONE of a legitimate poly lifestyle in any stories. We see "threesomes" but that isn't the same thing as a poly relationship where the people are all together and living a life together instead of just "in bed together".

Representation is a huge deal to me. I have gay and straight characters, bisexual characters, pansexual characters, asexual characters (later in the series), polyamorous characters, white, black, American Indian, European, etc. I do my best to put a real world's plethora of peoples into the story.

I'm so happy there's so many other authors here who have diverse characters in their writing. I'm enjoying this thread so much. Thanks all for sharing your experiences. :)

Now we should get together a big cross-promo some time. :)

Offline elizabethsade

  • Status: Jane Austen
  • ***
  • Posts: 447
  • Gender: Female
    • View Profile
Re: LGBT Authors Support Thread
« Reply #68 on: October 13, 2015, 02:16:01 PM »
So I've decided to delve into romance for a while and have been trying to figure out making a series. These would probably be contemporary, and I'll have different pen names for m/f, m/m, and f/f. Because I am a glutton for punishment.

With m/f it's easier, I think, to build a series of romances around a group of people. Since the majority of people are 'expected' to be straight (this gets my goat, it does).

What kind of inter-related group can I find for m/m or f/f? I'd like to be at least somewhat realistic and prefer to stay out of rockstars or related topics, since that's not a particular area of interest. A lot of the series I see popping up in the m/m list are paranormal, which I would rather avoid for the moment. I think that inter-connected would be better for sell-through, but how would you link premises in same-sex couples? I know Avery's done an LGBT football team, but are there more adult-y examples? I can think of a lot of YA or NA examples, but not many adult ones. Grumble.

Offline MMacLeod

  • Status: Jane Austen
  • ***
  • Posts: 488
  • Gender: Female
  • Massachusetts
    • View Profile
Re: LGBT Authors Support Thread
« Reply #69 on: October 13, 2015, 02:31:53 PM »
With m/f it's easier, I think, to build a series of romances around a group of people. Since the majority of people are 'expected' to be straight (this gets my goat, it does).

What kind of inter-related group can I find for m/m or f/f?
If you want a big series, it probably has to be set at least in a minor way in a place where you expect more than your average number of gay people. Like, a typical accounting office might be a little weird if for some reason it had 10 single gay men looking for love- but it's more believable if it were the campaign office for a LGBT supporting candidate. Of course, you can just go with a group of friends and it would be pretty believable.

But wondering, didn't you say earlier that you also write m/f romance? Have you considered doing a series where you have all of the above, m/f, m/m, f/f pairings in different books of the series? I saw that done recently by Melissa Foster. Not sure how it has gone for her sales (book 1 is m/f, book 2 is f/f and tells the story of the sister of the MC from book 1, and there's supposed to be a m/m book coming soon), but the reviews seemed positive overall. It might be a way to broaden the audience of potential readers. I had an idea to do a series of 3 books set at a community theater, with two books having m/f couples and one having f/f.

FF Romance
Miranda MacLeod | Website

Offline elizabethsade

  • Status: Jane Austen
  • ***
  • Posts: 447
  • Gender: Female
    • View Profile
Re: LGBT Authors Support Thread
« Reply #70 on: October 13, 2015, 02:46:41 PM »
If you want a big series, it probably has to be set at least in a minor way in a place where you expect more than your average number of gay people. Like, a typical accounting office might be a little weird if for some reason it had 10 single gay men looking for love- but it's more believable if it were the campaign office for a LGBT supporting candidate. Of course, you can just go with a group of friends and it would be pretty believable.

But wondering, didn't you say earlier that you also write m/f romance? Have you considered doing a series where you have all of the above, m/f, m/m, f/f pairings in different books of the series? I saw that done recently by Melissa Foster. Not sure how it has gone for her sales (book 1 is m/f, book 2 is f/f and tells the story of the sister of the MC from book 1, and there's supposed to be a m/m book coming soon), but the reviews seemed positive overall. It might be a way to broaden the audience of potential readers. I had an idea to do a series of 3 books set at a community theater, with two books having m/f couples and one having f/f.

I will literally write pretty much any sort of pairings. I've written m/f, m/m, f/f, m/m/m, m/m/f, and so on and so forth. I like playing with people, so to speak, and the different dynamics that crop up in different types of pairs (or the ones that cross over between pairs) fascinate me. It's why romance is such a good fit for me. :D

Holy lots of books, batman. Any idea which series of hers it is? xD I think the reason she probably gets away with it is because of her visibility as an NYT/etc author? I'm not sure how well it would work, crossing those lines so to speak as a brand-new author. (Would it make branding more difficult, would it confuse people, etc.) I think down the road I would definitely want to incorporate more diverse pairs into my 'main name', whichever it is - and honestly, it's probably going to end up being one pen name that's almost exclusively m/m with maybe one or two pairs different, one's f/f with one or two different, then a 'main name' that starts off m/f but starts branching out when it's logical, and maybe eventually brings the other two under its wings. Or not. I dunno.

I think it's going to depend a lot on what kind of readership I want to target, too? Because there's a demographic of people who are fine with crossover and there's a demographic who isn't. So I think separating until I build up a platform and then maybe slowly integrating them might be the better way to increase visibility...

Offline MMacLeod

  • Status: Jane Austen
  • ***
  • Posts: 488
  • Gender: Female
  • Massachusetts
    • View Profile
Re: LGBT Authors Support Thread
« Reply #71 on: October 13, 2015, 03:43:57 PM »
Holy lots of books, batman. Any idea which series of hers it is?
Uh, yeah- she seems to be an unstoppable force of nature. I went to her friend and sometimes writing partner, Bella Andre's, session at a writing conference last year and felt like I survived a hurricane, but like in a good way.

The series is Harborside Nights. Book is Discovering Delilah. The fact that it is being done now, if only by a big name, makes me wonder if in a few years it will be pretty mainstream.

FF Romance
Miranda MacLeod | Website

Offline elizabethsade

  • Status: Jane Austen
  • ***
  • Posts: 447
  • Gender: Female
    • View Profile
Re: LGBT Authors Support Thread
« Reply #72 on: October 13, 2015, 03:48:18 PM »
Uh, yeah- she seems to be an unstoppable force of nature. I went to her friend and sometimes writing partner, Bella Andre's, session at a writing conference last year and felt like I survived a hurricane, but like in a good way.

The series is Harborside Nights. Book is Discovering Delilah. The fact that it is being done now, if only by a big name, makes me wonder if in a few years it will be pretty mainstream.

I bet. xD That sounds like an awesome session, though. Oh, found the book. Not surprised there's more mm than ff, since that's relatively typical in romance, but. It's still pretty awesome.

I hope so. I really do. For one, it'd make my life easier - and for two, I think it'd be more representative of how America actually is. It definitely does lend well to eventually integrating my pen names into one main name, though. Or at least branching out the m/f one.

Offline AngryGames

  • Status: Scheherazade
  • *****
  • Posts: 1556
  • Gender: Male
  • Boise, ID
  • Stoner Fiction Enthusiast
    • View Profile
    • AngryGames
Re: LGBT Authors Support Thread
« Reply #73 on: October 15, 2015, 12:44:00 AM »
Quote
3. Someone mentioned Poly... Yeah there's poly stuff in my books. :) I'm poly myself and I wanted to represent that as well because we see almost NONE of a legitimate poly lifestyle in any stories. We see "threesomes" but that isn't the same thing as a poly relationship where the people are all together and living a life together instead of just "in bed together".

I mentioned it because as I've been wandering down that path for the last couple of years, I realize it's a much larger than visible subset of society. It's so very interesting when you're either part of that group or very close friends (or relatives) of someone in it to see how the dynamics of relationships evolve, modify, and unfortunately, sometimes completely collapse.

My initial impression was of course "threesome" (pretty much every het man's wettest dream in my experience, and I've got about 20 years of experience in tech that mostly focused on adult entertainment). My secondary impression was "fundamentalist Mormons" but that was easy since I grew up in and somehow still live in Idaho. A few years ago I watched a documentary on SHO or HBO or such about polyamory. My tertiary impression was "haha, Los Angeles / Hollywood a-holes co-opting the free love movement of the 60's and 70's." Then I discovered OK Cupid, POF, and a few other dating websites that were under the radar (considering all you ever hear about on TV or such is match.com and eharmony.com).

As I began talking to various women, and soon enough their partners (both men and women), I realized that this was something new. New maybe isn't a proper way to say it, as these communities have always existed, as far back as ancient times. But in our Puritanical America, where sex is taboo and cutting off someone's head or shooting them in the head is somehow less morally repugnant, outing any kind of "deviant" sexuality has always been extremely risky. Again, my father decided not to risk outing himself as a gay man and instead married not once, not twice, but three times (my mother was #2 and #3). Ruining both families was deemed more socially acceptable ("he was a terrible father" "drunken SOB" "mental case") than being a homosexual. Kids are still killing themselves over being outed as "different." Too many in society still believe transgender persons are sick pedophiles who want to use the "wrong" bathroom to... I don't know, but sick [crap] I guess? (don't get me started on a rant about transphobia)

Anyway, this polyamory thing isn't really new, but it is new to most people who don't know history or have maybe just lived in their own monogamy bubble and never got exposed to the universe outside of it. I've been around LGBT persons, businesses, groups, etc. my whole life and I was unaware that poly was a thing. A much larger thing than I think most people realize. Finding out how ugly the reaction from poly persons can be when you mistakenly (or in my case the first time, ignorantly) label them "swingers" is a necessarily rude awakening. Imagine Gollum's hissing and spitting at Frodo. That's the kind of reaction I got, but like I said, rightfully so.

The complex relationship webs poly persons weave is fascinating because when it works, it's like a well-oiled machine, a smoothly running factory. The energy between 3+ persons who are all in love is intense, almost overwhelming, especially to anyone who has lived their whole life in monogamy. (Note: I'm not advocating any relationship type, just babbling about my views/experiences as a mostly objective observer). It's especially interesting when different poly "families" have members within another family. Sort of like a cross between the "Red Rover" game we played as kids and a Venn diagram.

Hanging out with a quad who all live in the same household and are intimate with each other was a good experience. I knew there was more behind the scenes that I would never see unless I was an intimate member of their family. But the ease which all four interacted told me that they had done fairly well at working out most of the bumps and kinks that come with trying to balance intimate feelings between three persons while also helping those three balance their emotions between everyone else in the group. But it wasn't until we were invited to a backyard barbecue that even more complex dynamics began to manifest.

One of the ladies in the original quad was also dating a woman from a triad as well as a single male. One of the quad's men was also dating the same woman in the triad, but two other women as well, both from poly families of 4+ members (keep in mind, these "families" generally don't all live together under one roof... everyone seems to have their own lives outside of the family but they work hard to schedule time with each member whether alone or as part of a group get-together).

Yes, it gets very confusing. About as confusing as when dealing with a friend's (or your own) massively interconnected family. Or a Mexican soap opera (which are actually pretty awesome because of just how complicated the relationship chains can be). And for some of the members, particularly the single male who had never been exposed to the poly lifestyle, it's extremely difficult to both understand and accept. Jealousy is usually what kills a relationship, and it definitely exists in polyamory.

I guess my long-winded point is that there's a hell of a lot of persons who engage in polyamory. I've met "artist" types (writers, musicians, painters, etc) quite often, and the stereotype of us being a bit more morally relaxed is generally true. But a lot of polyamorous persons fall outside of this liberal/artsy sector. Lawyers, doctors, police officers, HR managers, child care providers, teachers, engineers... every walk of life is represented as far as I can tell. And while being gay, lesbian, or bisexual (well, a bi woman, anyway, bi men are still taboo for some reason I can't figure out) is really not that big of a deal for most these days, transgender persons, fetishists, poly, and others are now starting to slowly trickle into the mainstream.

I wouldn't say there's a specific number I could guess as to who was polyamorous, or into BDSM, or whatever other "oddity" that human beings might be/be into. I can only say I was surprised at how large the web of polyamory is in certain regions (west coast has far larger numbers according to my unscientific research). This surprise, of course, put my brain into "think about weird [crap]" mode, which gave me plenty of ideas. When I say "weird [crap]" I don't mean I think it's deviant or gross or super-weird (just regular weird!). Just weird compared to "normal" (whatever the [expletive] that means). But weird is good. Weird like shape-shifting BDSM billionaire BBW werewolf erotica has made careers for some authors.

Dino-tentacle insect porn and rapture apocalypse have a lot in common in that they both serve niche interests that aren't quite as niche as we think when we first hear about (and laugh or cringe at) them. Hell, we didn't think there was really that much interest in BDSM until 50 Shades showed up and freaked everyone out (we authors... we freaked out for entirely different reasons, but that's a whole different thread). I honestly and truly had no idea "shifter paranormal erotica/romance" was such a hugely popular thing. Prepper dystopia... well, I knew about that, but even it surprised me in terms of popularity.

What this means, now that I'm finally shutting up since "Elite: Dangerous" is finally done updating and I can go pew-pew some lame noobs (hopefully from Texas, I totally spawn-kill Texas gamers whenever the opportunity arises), is that there's another very large, very low-key audience out there who isn't being served. Or is underserved. So if you see me write a bunch of books about triads, polyrotica (I totally own that word now, you have to pay me a licensing fee to use it!), etc., you'll know I'm just trying to gain a foothold in an untapped market.

Like "stoner fiction" now that marijuana is accepted and even legal in some states. Imagine how many stoners there are who wish, no, DEMAND to be entertained...




*******

Travis Hill | Author Website | Blog | Twitter | Goodreads

Offline Jessie G. Talbot

  • Status: Scheherazade
  • *****
  • Posts: 1441
  • Gender: Female
  • Raleigh, NC
    • View Profile
    • My Website
Re: LGBT Authors Support Thread
« Reply #74 on: October 15, 2015, 07:43:51 AM »
I write kid books and I'm determined to make them inclusive. There's three families in 'B' having an adventure and one is a pair of married dads and their adopted daughter. It's a new book so I haven't caught any hell yet but I look forward to reactions, if any. It proves people are reading!

Jessie G. Talbot | Website | Twitter | Newsletter