Author Topic: Do you find classical literature less and less appealing?  (Read 2923 times)  

Offline Alberto L Pupo

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Re: Do you find classical literature less and less appealing?
« Reply #50 on: June 05, 2017, 05:18:54 AM »
I think this  can happen based on mood and the way you approach it. Classic literature is timeless because the themes that these writers touch upon are universal and transcend era. However,I can agree that at times the study of the culture can become dated especially when dealing with the humor because humor tends to best reflect a particular era and it is one thing that does change through time.

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Offline KBaker

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Re: Do you find classical literature less and less appealing?
« Reply #51 on: June 06, 2017, 08:35:15 PM »
It's never been appealing to me per se, but I do appreciate it and like to sit down with a good classic on occasion. Then there are the select favorites I can always return to. i.e. Jane Austen, Sherlock Holmes, and so forth. As for preferences, I do like modern books better. I guess a lot modern books are faster paced which is appealing to me since I have a low attention span, so a faster paced plot reels me in easier and makes the book go by quicker. Of course, this is bad for great books because it means it's over sooner.  :P

Online Elsye_Harwood

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Re: Do you find classical literature less and less appealing?
« Reply #52 on: August 16, 2017, 08:42:46 AM »
It always takes me a while to adjust  to a different authors writing style. So I've rarely been drawn straight into  what many would call a classic work of literature, but once into that writer I'll have no problem reading  more of their work and  can go on binges.

 I also  find it hard to jump from reading several  modern authors then moving onto read something a lot older, like Austen. It's too different, too wordy, so I have to ease myself in. A good Sherlock Holmes story normally does the trick for me. It's sort of bridge  between old and new and even though Conan Doyle  is a  classic writer.

I teach A Level  Classical Civilization to teenagers and I recently reread The Iliad which  for many years has been one of my favourite books. So I  was  shocked and disappointed  when I  became bored about half way through.  I was not pleased with myself.

Then for the second year of the  A level we had to read  The Aeneid,  which I'd always  found long winded and tedious. I was surprised when I found myself reading it for pleasure and loving the richness of the writing and human story line. As a student  I'd completely missed the pathos and tragedy of Aeneas's story and I could appreciate the subtle and not so subtle propaganda inherent in the book  regarding  Virgil's hopes for a  golden age under Augustus.

Some humour can be timeless as well. Aristophanes' Lysistrata  is a perfect example of that. My classes have been in stiches  when we've been reading it and  have even read it for themselves and recommended the play  to other students.

So for me some books are better now I'm older, but I always  need time to adjust to a different way of writing.
Historical fantasy mainly but knowing me it'll be all the ones I read as a child. Enid Blyton Scifi?
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