Author Topic: 450+ Ways to Describe Abs  (Read 18064 times)  

Offline GrandmaBirdie

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Re: Grandma Birdie's Lists: 450+ Ways to Describe Legs
« Reply #275 on: January 09, 2018, 10:45:47 AM »
Thank you for all of these wonderful lists, Birdie. (I have your ebook, too)

Thank you, Ione!

Offline TwistedTales

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Re: Grandma Birdie's Lists: 450+ Ways to Describe Legs
« Reply #276 on: January 09, 2018, 10:59:00 AM »
Good to see you back, grandmabirdie! Hope you had a great Christmas and thanks for yet another great list!

Offline GrandmaBirdie

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Re: Grandma Birdie's Lists: 450+ Ways to Describe Legs
« Reply #277 on: January 09, 2018, 01:57:10 PM »
Good to see you back, grandmabirdie! Hope you had a great Christmas and thanks for yet another great list!

Thanks, Twisted! Here's to a fantastic 2018 filled with opportunities and new friends.

Offline M R Mortimer

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Re: Grandma Birdie's Lists: 450+ Ways to Describe Legs
« Reply #278 on: January 10, 2018, 12:29:48 AM »
In my parent's day, legs were pins. As in "She/he has nice pins." Usually it was she. It was a different world then.
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Offline GrandmaBirdie

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Re: Grandma Birdie's Lists: 450+ Ways to Describe Legs
« Reply #279 on: January 10, 2018, 06:16:19 AM »
In my parent's day, legs were pins. As in "She/he has nice pins." Usually it was she. It was a different world then.

Ah, yes, words and writing styles change with the years. Period-fiction writers will choose different phrasing than modern-fiction novelists. I find etymonline.com an indispensable resource when researching words.

Offline GrandmaBirdie

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Re: Abbreviations, Acronyms, and Terms Used by Writers
« Reply #280 on: January 22, 2018, 07:09:13 AM »
January 22: Abbreviations, Acronyms, and Terms Used by Writers
Are you overwhelmed by the jargon spouted by people in the publishing industry? You'll find many definitions here.

January 15: Every Author and Poet Needs This Measurement Tool
Do you leave comments on blogs, ask bloggers to review your books, and volunteer for guest posts? Try this tool that helps you choose the right blogs.

Offline GrandmaBirdie

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Re: 300+ Ways to Describe Noses
« Reply #281 on: January 29, 2018, 06:49:43 AM »
This will be the last list for several weeks. Next Monday's blog post will explain why.

January 29: 300+ Ways to Describe Noses
The nose is a word-tool that can add depth to writing. This post provides more than 300 ways for writers to incorporate and describe noses.

Offline GrandmaBirdie

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Re: 500+ Words to Describe Faces
« Reply #282 on: March 12, 2018, 07:07:00 AM »
I'm back after a few weeks off for surgery and recovery.  :)

March 12: 500+ Words to Describe Faces
The face is usually the first thing people notice when they meet someone, and is often the body feature they rely on to make snap judgments.

March 5: 6 Tips for Remembering Story Ideas
If you're like most writers, ideas smack you on the head at the most inopportune times: while standing in line at the bank, when you're driving to work, just as you're falling asleep. No worries. Here are a few tips that will help you remember those ideas before they disappear into Lost-Idea Netherland.

Offline TwistedTales

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Re: 500+ Words to Describe Faces
« Reply #283 on: March 12, 2018, 07:42:26 AM »
Hope youre on the mend, GrandmaBirdie, and thanks for the tips!

Offline GrandmaBirdie

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Re: 500+ Words to Describe Faces
« Reply #284 on: March 12, 2018, 08:24:17 AM »
Thanks, Twisted! Every day brings a new improvement.

Offline M R Mortimer

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Re: 500+ Words to Describe Faces
« Reply #285 on: March 12, 2018, 07:30:12 PM »
Why oh why did my brain see an extra e in there? Right there in the last word... Mind you, that list might have been useful also, if you have a particularly nasty setting for your story...
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Online Paranormal Kitty

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Re: 500+ Words to Describe Faces
« Reply #286 on: March 12, 2018, 07:42:37 PM »
Why oh why did my brain see an extra e in there? Right there in the last word... Mind you, that list might have been useful also, if you have a particularly nasty setting for your story...

I hope she does that next time. It would come in handy for my next book, "The Hoarder and the Harlot". Or perhaps for a very niche brand of erotica.

Offline Valerie A.

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Re: 500+ Words to Describe Faces
« Reply #287 on: March 14, 2018, 02:22:35 PM »
I hope she does that next time. It would come in handy for my next book, "The Hoarder and the Harlot". Or perhaps for a very niche brand of erotica.
It's not so much the descriptions as the things you can do with/to them. At least in my profession. http://veterinarymedicine.dvm360.com/just-ask-expert-what-fecal-analysis-method-do-you-use

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Offline GrandmaBirdie

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Re: 350+ Words to Describe Teeth
« Reply #288 on: April 02, 2018, 08:55:43 AM »
April 2: 350+ Words to Describe Teeth
The average writer describes teeth to boost physical imagery. But the extraordinary writer describes them to advance character and plot development.

Offline thevoiceofone

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Re: 350+ Words to Describe Teeth
« Reply #289 on: April 03, 2018, 10:37:17 AM »
April 2: 350+ Words to Describe Teeth
The average writer describes teeth to boost physical imagery. But the extraordinary writer describes them to advance character and plot development.

I'm back after a few weeks off for surgery and recovery.  :)

March 12: 500+ Words to Describe Faces
The face is usually the first thing people notice when they meet someone, and is often the body feature they rely on to make snap judgments.

March 5: 6 Tips for Remembering Story Ideas
If you're like most writers, ideas smack you on the head at the most inopportune times: while standing in line at the bank, when you're driving to work, just as you're falling asleep. No worries. Here are a few tips that will help you remember those ideas before they disappear into Lost-Idea Netherland.

This will be the last list for several weeks. Next Monday's blog post will explain why.

January 29: 300+ Ways to Describe Noses
The nose is a word-tool that can add depth to writing. This post provides more than 300 ways for writers to incorporate and describe noses.

January 22: Abbreviations, Acronyms, and Terms Used by Writers
Are you overwhelmed by the jargon spouted by people in the publishing industry? You'll find many definitions here.

January 15: Every Author and Poet Needs This Measurement Tool
Do you leave comments on blogs, ask bloggers to review your books, and volunteer for guest posts? Try this tool that helps you choose the right blogs.

January 8: 450+ Ways to Describe Legs
Adjectives ... comparisons ... movement and feeling ... nouns ... anthropomorphization. Legs can add new dimension to writing.

December 18: Alternatives for "Afraid"
One flaw that might spur readers to abandon your book is excessive repetition. This post presents alternatives for "afraid."
(Last post until 2018.)

December 11: 16 Confusing Words and Phrases to Monitor in Writing
You know what you mean, but will others understand? This post discusses a few common words and phrases that readers might misinterpret.

December 4: Do You Overuse Similes with "Like"?
Ice cream is like similes. You enjoy that first creamy spoonful and delightful flavor. But what if you ingest too much too quickly?

November 27: Alternatives for Really+Verb Phrases
Really, exceedingly, immensely, very ... These modifiers are *really* overused by many writers. Consider these alternatives for really+verb phrases.

November 20: Other Ways to Say "Use"
"Use" haunts public signs, hangs out in instruction manuals, and gluts novels. This post presents dozens of ways to mitigate "use" overuse.

November 13: Alternatives for "But"
The simplest words are often the toughest to replace. Although rewording is an excellent option, sometimes direct substitutes function best.

November 6: Alternatives for "Because"
Although finding replacements for "because" is difficult, it's not impossible. Try these alternatives.

October 30: Other Ways to Say "Get"
GET ... or buy, pilfer, borrow, commandeer, mooch, requisition ... Strong verbs engage readers. Lackluster verbs bore them.

October 23: Why Effective Dialogue Often Ignores Writing "Rules"
Dialogue should sound real. It should motivate readers to finish "just one more chapter." After another. And another.

October 16: Strong Verbs Cheat Sheet
Ambiguous verbs dilute writing. Strong verbs invigorate narrative and deliver precise meanings--without increasing word count.

October 9: Action Beats: More than Dialogue Tag Surrogates
Action beats, like any literary device, distract readers if abused. Overreliance on them weakens writing.

October 2: 9 Ways to Reduce Reader Confusion
If you confuse readers, your narrative will be ineffectual. This post suggests alternatives for several instances of confusing wording.

September 25: How to Conquer Your Crutch Words
Crutch words contribute nothing more than fluff. These obnoxious weeds creep through your work and choke its vitality.

September 18: How to Exploit Negativity in Writing
Most people use negative words in dialogue. But would creative writing be stronger without all the nothings, nones, nevers, and nots?

September 11: Rules, Rules, Rules. 9 Writing "Rules" Examined
Rules barrage writers from all sides. This post dissects a few rules and presents examples of why they might (or might not) be valid.

September 4: Redundancies 102: 250+ Ways to Reduce Word Bloat
Is your WIP plagued by word bloat? This post provides over 250 phrases that you can delete, or replace with shorter alternatives.

August 28: 100+ Ways to Say "Sad"
Emotion in writing captivates readers, but if Mary Sue is sad on every page, she soon becomes irritating. Try these alternatives.

August 21: 6 Ways to Reduce "-ly" Adverb Abuse
Mark Twain found adverbs unexciting. So do readers. Energize your writing by pruning adverbs that end in "-ly." These steps will help.

August 14: 200 Ways to Say "Angry"
"Angry" is an innocuous word--unless it appears too often. These alternatives will help you avoid "angry" repetitions (and angry readers).

July 24: 100 Ways to Say "Sexy"
If you discuss with others what "sexy" means, you'll find varying opinions. That's part of what makes it a weak adjective. However, you have alternatives.

July 17: Over 150 Ways to Say "Put"
A writer can often replace "put" with a single verb that shows distinct action. However, "put" also appears in hundreds of phrases.

July 10: 85 Alternatives for Clenched Fists
How often do your characters clench their fists? A fist is a tightly closed hand with the fingers doubled into the palm. So do clenching fists make sense?

July 3: 120 Ways to Say "Itchy"
Are you frustrated because you can't find synonyms for "itchy"? You're not alone. "Itchy" is a ticklish word with few close relatives.

June 26: "Alright" vs. "All Right": Which is "Right"?
Authors have penned "alright" for more than 130 years. Common sense suggests that public acceptance should justify the existence of a word. Right?

June 19: 50 Alternatives for "Wink" in Writing
Do your characters wink so often that their eyes resemble flashing signal lights? A wink is a vague action that might be misconstrued. Try these alternatives.

June 12: Too Many Filter Words in Your Writing? 80 Alternatives
Why should you avoid filter words? Think of the last time you stood in line at a bank or grocery store. Did you enjoy the wait?

June 5: 4 Guidelines for Stacked Modifiers
Should you worry about adjective order or how many modifiers you include in a sequence? What about commas and hyphens? Read this article for the answers.

May 29: 100+ Ways to Say "Blush"
Why do people blush? Writers should know their characters' motivations. Then, their duty is to show readers the cause of each blush.

May 22: Too Many Sighs of Relief in Your Writing? 75 Alternatives
Do your protagonists sigh in relief or breathe sighs of relief on every second page? Maybe it's time for a rewrite.

May 15: 120 Ways to Say "Pout"
The usual replacement chosen by writers for "pout" is "pursed lips," an unoriginal phrase. Try these alternatives instead.

May 8: 8 Guidelines for Contractions in Writing
Contractions were invented centuries ago. They make our writing more personable. Beware that you don't develop contractionitis, though.

May 1: Why You Should Avoid "Feel" in Writing: 50 Alternatives
Whenever you write about a character feeling something, you distance readers from your narrative. Here's how to avoid the "feel" trap.

April 24: 100 Ways to Say "Nice"
"Nice" is an unpretentious word that doesn't pack a lot of punch. 100 alternatives.

April 17: 200 Ways to Say "Good"
Does "good" plague every second paragraph of your WIP? Try these alternatives.

April 10: 200 Ways to Say "Bad"
Overuse will transform "bad" into a pest that annoys readers worse than an army of angry ants. Try these alternatives.

April 3: 100 Ways to Say "Clear the Throat"
Have you ever shared space with someone who clears their throat every few minutes? Annoying. Fictional characters who do that will annoy readers too.


Love this ^^^ Thanks.

Offline GrandmaBirdie

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Re: 350+ Words to Describe Teeth
« Reply #290 on: April 03, 2018, 10:52:16 AM »
Thanks, the voice. Wow. You quoted the entire initial post.  :o

Offline Pandorra

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Re: 350+ Words to Describe Teeth
« Reply #291 on: April 03, 2018, 10:58:05 AM »
Funny, I saw this and all I could think was that riddle... 50 white horses on a red hill, first they chomp, then they stomp then they stand still ...
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Offline GrandmaBirdie

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Re: 600+ Words to Describe Arms
« Reply #292 on: April 09, 2018, 08:53:28 AM »
April 9: 600+ Words to Describe Arms
Although your first thought might be to find words for physical descriptions of arms, consider also the deeper meanings they can add to writing.

Offline GrandmaBirdie

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Re: 450+ Ways to Describe Abs
« Reply #293 on: April 16, 2018, 09:21:28 AM »
April 16: 450+ Ways to Describe the Abdomen and Waist Area
Abs, abdomen, stomach, waist, midsection ... No matter what you call this area of the body, well-chosen words will strengthen your writing.

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