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Stone and Silt
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Big Al's Books & Pals 2014 Readers' Choice Awards: Young Adult Nominee

A ruthless murder and a stolen shipment of gold.

At school, sixteen-year-old Nikaia Wales endures the taunts of bullies who call her a “half-breed.” At home, she worries about how her family will react if she reveals her growing feelings for the quiet boy next door.

Those are soon the least of her troubles. Nikaia discovers a hidden cache of gold, and when police find a corpse nearby, her father becomes a suspect. Worse, Elias Doyle is circling, hungry to avenge his brother’s death.

Nikaia desperately searches for clues to save her father. In her quest to find the killer, she learns about the power of family, friendship, and young love....

Author Topic: AMS Ads Learning  (Read 130584 times)  

Offline Cassie Leigh

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Re: AMS Ads Learning
« Reply #1000 on: June 15, 2017, 05:08:46 AM »
I have my bid set at $1 for the 'crime fiction' keyword for the crime/noir novel that I published May 28. If I open an incognito/private browsing window (so I'm not logged into amazon and no cached cookies or other info can prejudice the results) and go to amazon.com and search on crime fiction in the books category, my book shows up on page 12 of the carousel.

Is that about what you experienced folks would expect for what I assume is a highly competitive keyword?

What do you estimate it would take in terms of a bid to get to page one? I'm currently just experimenting, I don't want to invest a lot until I have books two and three in the series available.

I don't actually look for my books on the carousel but when I'm poking around in other's books I usually see my books in the 1, 2, or 3 slot on the first page of the carousel and I bid lower than that most of the time.  Still higher than most here, but lower than that.  This is for fantasy, though, so it's possible it's a less competitive category than crime fiction.  But even in romance I don't normally bid that high and I'm getting clicks on that book, too, so it could be Amazon has decided your book isn't a good fit for that word and is prioritizing others over you since it's not all just pure bidding that determines placement.


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Online BillyDeCarlo

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Re: AMS Ads Learning
« Reply #1001 on: June 15, 2017, 05:14:37 AM »
I don't actually look for my books on the carousel but when I'm poking around in other's books I usually see my books in the 1, 2, or 3 slot on the first page of the carousel and I bid lower than that most of the time.  Still higher than most here, but lower than that.  This is for fantasy, though, so it's possible it's a less competitive category than crime fiction.  But even in romance I don't normally bid that high and I'm getting clicks on that book, too, so it could be Amazon has decided your book isn't a good fit for that word and is prioritizing others over you since it's not all just pure bidding that determines placement.

Actually, I forgot to mention that I when I searched on crime fiction I also clicked 4 stars and above and releases within 30 days, so otherwise I'd be much farther down than page 12! I think you're right - there are definitely other factors at play then, I assume that being current sales, other titles by the author, how well the author sells (nada since it's a brand new pen name), etc. I think this provides some insight to those who are trying to crack the algorithm.
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Offline Cassie Leigh

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Re: AMS Ads Learning
« Reply #1002 on: June 15, 2017, 05:16:40 AM »
Maybe I'm worrying over nothing. I just don't like the way June is shaping up.

My lead ad, the one that sells all the other fiction, averages 1 click per 389 impressions. In the last week alone, it has gained over 100k impressions. It has run out of daily budget maybe twice over seven months, and slowly over time I raised the budget to $15. It has never used that up. I believe raising my bids on the best-producing keywords accelerated impressions and clicks, but my data on the keyword bids over time are spotty. Also, my head hurts after spending an hour trying to make sense of them.

There is no way I can know which keyword produces more KU reads than outright sales. If that actually happens. Perhaps someone who sells at a much higher daily level might know if in most cases the sales match or exceed the page reads. Given that, I don't know whether to dump certain keywords, or raise my bids on them, or lower them.
 

I'm dealing with this with my romance ad because I'm probably 75% borrows on it which isn't my norm.  What I've decided to do is not to pause any keywords other than the ones that aren't getting clicks.  So, for example, I had one author keyword that had something like 19,000 impressions and no clicks, so I paused that one.  I basically pause at about 1,800 impressions and no clicks because, as you've noticed, romance tends to click more than other genres.

For the other keywords, if I get past a certain number of clicks and don't see a buy or that author in my also-boughts then I lower the bid in favor of books where I am seeing buys.  But I don't shut it down.

This is for an ad that I've been starting at $10 every morning and has maxed out as high as $60 on a given day for the last three weeks with sales/borrows to pay for it.  I will add that yesterday my ranks didn't drop but it was an extremely slow day compared to the day before for both my fantasy and romance titles.


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Offline Cassie Leigh

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Re: AMS Ads Learning
« Reply #1003 on: June 15, 2017, 05:18:47 AM »
Actually, I forgot to mention that I when I searched on crime fiction I also clicked 4 stars and above and releases within 30 days, so otherwise I'd be much farther down than page 12! I think you're right - there are definitely other factors at play then, I assume that being current sales, other titles by the author, how well the author sells (nada since it's a brand new pen name), etc. I think this provides some insight to those who are trying to crack the algorithm.

Ah.  That's not the carousel that I think most people are referring to.  The carousel is on the book pages itself.  So search for a crime fiction author and go to one of their book pages and see where your books fall in that list of sponsored products that has about eight books per page listed.

In terms of search results there are only two shown at the bottom of the first page so that would be harder to get onto and I don't always see myself on that first page, but sometimes do.


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Online BillyDeCarlo

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Re: AMS Ads Learning
« Reply #1004 on: June 15, 2017, 07:44:10 AM »
Ah.  That's not the carousel that I think most people are referring to.  The carousel is on the book pages itself.  So search for a crime fiction author and go to one of their book pages and see where your books fall in that list of sponsored products that has about eight books per page listed.

Ah, okay. So, using that way, I'm on page 20 for David Baldacci and page 12 for Clive Cussler on a $1 max bid (without any further filtering as far as stars or new releases). What would it take to get up to the first few pages, anyone care to speculate based on their experience?
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Offline Cassie Leigh

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Re: AMS Ads Learning
« Reply #1005 on: June 15, 2017, 08:22:03 AM »
Ah, okay. So, using that way, I'm on page 20 for David Baldacci and page 12 for Clive Cussler on a $1 max bid (without any further filtering as far as stars or new releases). What would it take to get up to the first few pages, anyone care to speculate based on their experience?

You can try bumping your bids higher.  When I did my recent launch I tried $1.25 and $2.50 at one point just to see what would happen and had a couple clicks that cost me over a dollar so there are definitely people bidding that high, but if I were you I would instead work on adding different keywords that can get you on those pages for less spend.  I assume you are also using David Baldacci and Clive Cussler as keywords?  And maybe some of their titles as well?

If Amazon decides you aren't a great fit I don't think any bid is going to be enough to get you up there.

Also, if you don't have at least 100 keywords on your ad, try to get up to that level.  It's something I'm poking at right now because some of my non-fiction ads that had done okay and then stalled out only had 35-50 keywords and I'm thinking more keywords might help.  My more successful fiction ads generally have between 150-250 keywords and I'm trying to see if that could be part of it.  For me that's probably 80% author names, 15% generic words like "romance" or "fantasy" or "contemporary romance", and 5% titles of books because those don't work as well for me.

If you're stuck for words to use, add authors from your book's also-boughts and those author's also-boughts.


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Offline weigle1234

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Re: AMS Ads Learning
« Reply #1006 on: June 15, 2017, 12:45:12 PM »

 My more successful fiction ads generally have between 150-250 keywords and I'm trying to see if that could be part of it.  For me that's probably 80% author names, 15% generic words like "romance" or "fantasy" or "contemporary romance", and 5% titles of books because those don't work as well for me.

If you're stuck for words to use, add authors from your book's also-boughts and those author's also-boughts.


I am trying to locate unbiased information on Dave Chesson.  He promotes his eBook KDP Rocket quite heavily, and offers a FREE course on mastering AMS ads and choosing AMS Keywords.

Just for kicks, I am about 25% into his FREE course, and it appears to be legitimate.  If, after finishing the course, it still appears to be legitimate I will consider ordering his book.

I have spent an hour or more on Google trying to get some meaningful information on both Dave and his KDP Rocket eBook.  However, all I come up with is an endless barrage of hype about both he and his book.  Every time I come across something which looks unbiased, it turns out to be an interview with Dave - i.e., more hype.

Has anyone here had dealings with either Dave or his eBook, or know anything at all about either?

Offline Alvina

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Re: AMS Ads Learning
« Reply #1007 on: June 16, 2017, 12:26:00 AM »
Usually my ads are approved in less than 12 hours, but I just had one that took about 30 hours to get approved.  Submitted at 8 pm on Tuesday and was only approved early this morning so they were definitely slower than normal.
From my experience, the first ad takes longer to get approved than subsequent ads. So you should hear back from them soon.

Thanks Cassie and Colin, my first ads was approved after 24 hours, but my second ads was running in less than 12 hours!

Anyway, my first ads has 3800 Impressions and got only 1 click. The second ads has 2000 Impressions and received 2 clicks. Nevertheless, none of them bought me any sales.   :-X
« Last Edit: June 16, 2017, 01:28:13 AM by Alvina »



Offline Shelley K

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Re: AMS Ads Learning
« Reply #1008 on: June 16, 2017, 01:22:16 AM »
Thanks Cassie and Colin, my first ads was approved after 24 hours, but my second ads was running in less than 12 hours!

Anyway, my first ads has 3800 Impressions and got only 1 click. The second ads has 2000 Impression and received 2 clicks. Nevertheless, none of them bought me any sales.   :-X

Alvina, look at your also-boughts and their also-boughts. Use those author name and book names as keywords.

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Re: AMS Ads Learning
« Reply #1009 on: June 16, 2017, 04:00:21 AM »
Ah, okay. So, using that way, I'm on page 20 for David Baldacci and page 12 for Clive Cussler on a $1 max bid (without any further filtering as far as stars or new releases). What would it take to get up to the first few pages, anyone care to speculate based on their experience?

I think it's a bit more complicated than just bid price, and much of it is out of our control. Amazon has algorithms at work that further determine where (or if) your book will appear on the carousel.

The following is pure speculation on my part, based on experience and reports from others.

For Amazon, it seems to be all about positive customer experience. They are most interested in providing relevant product suggestions, so much of what appears on those carousels (and the order) is tailored to each customer. I have to assume it's based on what they have purchased and/or searched on in the past.

So if you're trying to use "Stephen King" as a keyword for a romance novel campaign, and set a high bid, it's still a long-shot that your book will appear on page one of someone who loves horror books and is searching on Stephen King. However, if this person has previously purchased something that would suggest to the 'Zon that they would like romance novels, then maybe your romance novel will make an appearance somewhere on that carousel.

On the other hand, if the search was on a romance author (which was used as a keyword), then your book has a far better chance of appearing. On what page would depend on bid price and how many other AMS campaigns are vying for that same keyword at the time (and a lot of other things, like current sales rank, reviews, etc.).

Again, this is just my take on what's going on behind the AMS curtain.
 
« Last Edit: June 16, 2017, 04:31:11 AM by Accord64 »
 

Offline AlexaKang

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Re: AMS Ads Learning
« Reply #1010 on: June 16, 2017, 07:53:33 AM »
I think it's a bit more complicated than just bid price, and much of it is out of our control. Amazon has algorithms at work that further determine where (or if) your book will appear on the carousel.

The following is pure speculation on my part, based on experience and reports from others.

For Amazon, it seems to be all about positive customer experience. They are most interested in providing relevant product suggestions, so much of what appears on those carousels (and the order) is tailored to each customer. I have to assume it's based on what they have purchased and/or searched on in the past.

So if you're trying to use "Stephen King" as a keyword for a romance novel campaign, and set a high bid, it's still a long-shot that your book will appear on page one of someone who loves horror books and is searching on Stephen King. However, if this person has previously purchased something that would suggest to the 'Zon that they would like romance novels, then maybe your romance novel will make an appearance somewhere on that carousel.

On the other hand, if the search was on a romance author (which was used as a keyword), then your book has a far better chance of appearing. On what page would depend on bid price and how many other AMS campaigns are vying for that same keyword at the time (and a lot of other things, like current sales rank, reviews, etc.).

Again, this is just my take on what's going on behind the AMS curtain.

As much as I like to agree with you in theory, I'm going to have to disagree about the AMS ads catering to customers preferences. I've been running Sponsored Products ads since last July. I've come to the conclusion that there is some or little correlations as to which books show up on any book's page. The algo switches things around. Sometimes they are genre relevant. Other times, it's as if Amazon has a general list of books (anywhere from 15-100+) that they just throw up there.

Case in point, I write WWII historical fiction. Due to AMS ads, I'm very familiar now with all the latest releases and bestselling WWII fiction to some that languish in the high 6 figures. It never ceases to amaze me how often I see Romance novels with half-naked six-pack men on the cover, or worse Dark Romances about kidnapping and BDSM, listed as sponsored products on a page for a book about the Holocaust. You cannot convince me that someone looking to read about this horrific time in history is interested at that moment to get off on a shifter or billionnaire, or that the reader is concurrently fantasizing about being kidnapped and abused. Sorry, that's just sick. It doesn't happen all the time, but I've seen it enough to conclude that Amazon has a general list of ads that they throw up there sometimes regardless of the book.

Actually, I see 2 lists. One is a list that goes on for 100+ pages. The books on that list are predetermined somehow. They include a variety of generally popular genres like Romances of various kinds with men chests on covers, and thrillers (Atlantic Gene is always on this one, and for a while, Girl Jacked), mixed in with some garden variety of whatever. This list goes on books that are selling well, or books of more niche genres where there aren't a lot of  sponsored products ads for that genre. Perhaps Amazon just figures, let's just throw the most popular stuff up there because those are what EVERYBODY wants to buy.

The second list is smaller, about 10-15 books, all from the same 3 authors (or I suspect, the same publisher with the same 3 pen names), bidding at about $0.05, usually of some sheik romance themes. These are the first t0 go up for all the new releases. It's like Amazon's go-to list to start. (Why these books are so favored? I don't know. I know we're not supposed to opine on whether books are good or bad but seriously, there are better books out there.) They'll eventually get pushed to the back when the list populats with other ads bidding higher, but they always get first dip, regardless of the fact that the genre is totally unrelated.

Anyway, this is what I see when I check for historical fiction.

As for product display ads, I have seen maybe once, when a book of same genre shows up on another book's page. They're typically completely off if they are supposed to target interested readers.

Offline AlexaKang

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Re: AMS Ads Learning
« Reply #1011 on: June 16, 2017, 07:55:11 AM »
Also, my head hurts after spending an hour trying to make sense of them.

I feel your pain.

On another note, to Cassie, thanks for continuously answering our questions and trying to help.

Offline khotisarque

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Re: AMS Ads Learning
« Reply #1012 on: June 16, 2017, 07:58:19 AM »

"The following is pure speculation on my part, based on experience and reports from others."

That seems very reasonable.  I would like to make a couple of comments.  First, such a strategy reinforces the already-successful authors and their books while placing invisible obstacles in the way of newcomers.  Trying to cross-sell from Romance to Historical Fiction is impeded but buttressing your standing within your established niche is encouraged.  Eventually this results in a sameness and the same short-list of established names writing variations of their same old thing - exactly like the less adventurous trad publishers.  Pity.  Second thing, Amazon does [gasp!] make mistakes like the rest of us and sometimes their outcomes are unintended.  But they do get corrected after they are recognized.

That said, where else can you get free exposure?  It's a good deal for us even if imperfect.
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Offline AlexaKang

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Re: AMS Ads Learning
« Reply #1013 on: June 16, 2017, 08:01:14 AM »
I have my bid set at $1 for the 'crime fiction' keyword for the crime/noir novel that I published May 28. If I open an incognito/private browsing window (so I'm not logged into amazon and no cached cookies or other info can prejudice the results) and go to amazon.com and search on crime fiction in the books category, my book shows up on page 12 of the carousel.

Is that about what you experienced folks would expect for what I assume is a highly competitive keyword?

What do you estimate it would take in terms of a bid to get to page one? I'm currently just experimenting, I don't want to invest a lot until I have books two and three in the series available.

Billy, my 2 cents: stop trying to bid on the top ranking bestsellers like David Baldacci. These aren't FB ads. You'll burn through your wallet. And you don't need to get on their pages, it's not effective.

The carousel is a changing baby/beast. You have to keep watch and constantly tend to it and feed it, take care of it.

Start by going to your main genre and subgenre's HNR list. See who's on top. It probably is not David Baldacci, but some up and coming or other midlist authors who are also selling well.

Check the ads on their pages. If they have fewer than 20 pages of ads on the carousel, get yourself on those pages. You can probably bid under $0.40 and get on the first page. Even getting on p.3 will be good.

If the have 100+ pages of ads of irrelevant genres, then Amazon is doing its weird thing and throwing up everything. Wait till the hype for these books die down. Check back in 2-3 weeks. Those 100+ pages will/might revert back to 10-15 pages. I've even seen it revert down to 2 pages. But those books will still be selling well since your genre is not the fast and burn trending kind. Now you can try using those pages as KWs.




Offline LilyBLily

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Re: AMS Ads Learning
« Reply #1014 on: June 16, 2017, 08:14:13 AM »

The second list is smaller, about 10-15 books, all from the same 3 authors (or I suspect, the same publisher with the same 3 pen names), bidding at about $0.05, usually of some sheik romance themes. These are the first t0 go up for all the new releases. It's like Amazon's go-to list to start. (Why these books are so favored? I don't know. I know we're not supposed to opine on whether books are good or bad but seriously, there are better books out there.) They'll eventually get pushed to the back when the list populats with other ads bidding higher, but they always get first dip, regardless of the fact that the genre is totally unrelated.

I've checked on those three "authors" in the past and their books are not ranked high. All their positive reviews are obviously fake, and some of their negative reviews accuse them of not writing full-length books. I assume the publisher behind them bids fantastically high and uses all 1,000 keywords and makes it up in KU reads. Reads do affect ranking but not as much as sales do, I believe, which accounts for their poor ranking. Also, you can bid $5 per keyword and not spend over .05 cents if someone clicks. If no one clicks, the ad gets free impressions, so it's a win-win. I guess if we wanted to risk it, we could do the same, bid $5 per keyword. But not on a Stephen King book.

Offline Cassie Leigh

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Re: AMS Ads Learning
« Reply #1015 on: June 16, 2017, 08:24:31 AM »
On another note, to Cassie, thanks for continuously answering our questions and trying to help.

Thanks.  And just to be clear, I know I don't have all the answers, I just have my own experience and what has/hasn't worked for me.  I did really dig into the mechanics of the different ad types to write that book so those things I can point people to when they come up, but like I say in the book getting these things to work is more art than science.  What works on one of my ads doesn't on another and what works for me doesn't for someone else and what's worked for others hasn't worked for me.  That's why I appreciate this discussion so much because we all throw in what we're seeing and doing and can learn together as things change.


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Online Accord64

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Re: AMS Ads Learning
« Reply #1016 on: June 16, 2017, 11:28:33 AM »
Case in point, I write WWII historical fiction. Due to AMS ads, I'm very familiar now with all the latest releases and bestselling WWII fiction to some that languish in the high 6 figures. It never ceases to amaze me how often I see Romance novels with half-naked six-pack men on the cover, or worse Dark Romances about kidnapping and BDSM, listed as sponsored products on a page for a book about the Holocaust. You cannot convince me that someone looking to read about this horrific time in history is interested at that moment to get off on a shifter or billionnaire, or that the reader is concurrently fantasizing about being kidnapped and abused. Sorry, that's just sick. It doesn't happen all the time, but I've seen it enough to conclude that Amazon has a general list of ads that they throw up there sometimes regardless of the book.

I guess my point was that we can't be sure if all customers are seeing the same things, since the 'Zon seems to customize returns for each. Although I won't disagree that the algos get a little crazy at times...  :o
 

Offline AlexaKang

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Re: AMS Ads Learning
« Reply #1017 on: June 16, 2017, 12:27:36 PM »
I've checked on those three "authors" in the past and their books are not ranked high. All their positive reviews are obviously fake, and some of their negative reviews accuse them of not writing full-length books. I assume the publisher behind them bids fantastically high and uses all 1,000 keywords and makes it up in KU reads. Reads do affect ranking but not as much as sales do, I believe, which accounts for their poor ranking. Also, you can bid $5 per keyword and not spend over .05 cents if someone clicks. If no one clicks, the ad gets free impressions, so it's a win-win. I guess if we wanted to risk it, we could do the same, bid $5 per keyword. But not on a Stephen King book.


OMG!! Lily I'm ROTFL. It's totally true. They use TONS of fake reviews and obvious as hell too. I don't know why Amazon lets them do get away with this. This is why I say this publisher is Amazon's favored child. She gets first dip in AMS ads, and she gets away with fake reviews.

I checked out some of her reviewers. They clearly review books for pay. What cracked me up was some of these reviewers gave good reviews for paleo cook books AND vegan cook books. Now granted, a household could have people with different eating habits, but...nah, I don't buy it from the way the reviews were written. No one is a paleo eater AND a vegan.

And one minute these reviewers are endorsing a book on high power financial executive strategies, while next minute they're endorsing a book on how to make quilts. Yep. I Grandma is CEO on Wall Street by day, and a sweet little old lady making quilts at night. :D

These "authors" don't bid high though. They bid at around 5c. I know because whenever I see them on a page I want to be on, I bid at $.10 and will leap over them on the carousel.
« Last Edit: June 16, 2017, 12:30:50 PM by AlexaKang »

Offline Seneca42

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Re: AMS Ads Learning
« Reply #1018 on: June 16, 2017, 12:47:35 PM »
I think it's a bit more complicated than just bid price, and much of it is out of our control. Amazon has algorithms at work that further determine where (or if) your book will appear on the carousel.

It's definitely a hodge podge of things. Last week I got incredibly lucky. An amazon imprint book was released and one of my keywords was in the blurb for that book. Because it was a new book and a new author, no one even knew it was released I guess. Long story short, only 5 books were in the carousel of a book that was ranked #5 in the paid store. My book was first in the carousel and clicks were costing me about 7c.

Fast forward a week, there's now 100 pages of ads or whatever and my book is gone from the ads carousel.

So it's really a crapshoot. bidding matters, but sometimes it doesn't. And sometimes it doesn't for a while and then it does as other authors rush in on a book and drive the bids through the roof.


Offline Steven Kelliher

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Re: AMS Ads Learning
« Reply #1019 on: June 16, 2017, 10:30:30 PM »
So ... "Estimated Orders" vs. "Estimated Total Sales" ... I don't get it.

Just noticed this distinction when clicking to edit my running AMS ads.

There were a few adds showing $4.99 in total sales = 1 sale, but showing 6-7 estimated orders.

SUPER delayed reporting? Or 5-6 order declines/cancellations.

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Offline Author A.C. Salter

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Re: AMS Ads Learning
« Reply #1020 on: June 17, 2017, 04:42:49 AM »
May was my first month for AMS, and it was the best month I've had for sales and reads since publishing last year. So I copied the campaign, left the keywords the same but upped my daily budget to $2.

It's flopped. I even put the book on a countdown deal to reduce it to 99cents but it has had little effect.

I'm going to try adding more keywords and see what happens.

Still loving the thread 😀


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Online BillyDeCarlo

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Re: AMS Ads Learning
« Reply #1021 on: June 17, 2017, 04:45:11 AM »
It's definitely a hodge podge of things. Last week I got incredibly lucky. An amazon imprint book was released and one of my keywords was in the blurb for that book. Because it was a new book and a new author, no one even knew it was released I guess. Long story short, only 5 books were in the carousel of a book that was ranked #5 in the paid store. My book was first in the carousel and clicks were costing me about 7c.

How did you find out that all that happened? When you get a spike, how do you reverse engineer to the source like that?
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Offline weigle1234

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Re: AMS Ads Learning
« Reply #1022 on: June 17, 2017, 12:21:16 PM »
So ... "Estimated Orders" vs. "Estimated Total Sales" ... I don't get it.

Just noticed this distinction when clicking to edit my running AMS ads.

There were a few adds showing $4.99 in total sales = 1 sale, but showing 6-7 estimated orders.

SUPER delayed reporting? Or 5-6 order declines/cancellations.

My advice is to not rely on the Estimated Orders or ACoS entries.  I am sure there are delays in updating that info, but checking the Prior Months Royalties charts should give you more reliable data.

But, I even question those charts.  My very first AMS ad started running in mid January of this year.  Yet the charts also show Total Royalties for the months of October, November, and December of last year.  What is that all about?

Also, if you are (like myself) also selling paperbacks, the mystery deepens.  Apparently the ACoS figures also include paperback sales.  Are the included paperback sales only those that happen as the result of ad Clicks?  If so, that is great - I make more money from paperback sales.

If the ACoS includes any organic paperback sales, the scenario changes.  When my ACoS exceeds 70% I assume my ad is a loser, and I either Pause or Terminate it.  However, if ACoS includes organic paperback sales, even 40% could be a loser.

Reverse engineering should give answers, but can quickly evolve into a complex and confusing fiasco.

To my way of thinking, Kindle should clarify the ACoS thing (along with a few other things).  All this reminds me of our confusing tax laws (legal thievery) which IMHO are deliberately complex.  That way, folks are in a perpetual state of confusion, and eventually decide it is much easier to simply trust the tax thieves.  Do not make waves or, worse yet, fight the system and risk ending up in Federal prison.

I am not implying that either Kindle or Amazon is dishonest by any stretch - if I thought so, I would dump them in an instant.  But, my gut feeling is that the confusion factor probably works to their advantage.

Offline Seneca42

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Re: AMS Ads Learning
« Reply #1023 on: June 17, 2017, 06:42:07 PM »
How did you find out that all that happened? When you get a spike, how do you reverse engineer to the source like that?

was looking at my keywords and noticed "gandhi" had 4,000 impressions. Thought that was very strange, but ignored it. Came back about 8 hours later and looked... 16,000 impressions. Okay, VERY strange. So went and looked at gandhi books to see if my ad was there, nope, it wasn't.

Woke up the next morning, 24,000 impressions but had no idea from where.

Then I was just looking through the best seller scifi list to see who was there and was checking out the ads to how much competition was going on for the top books, and then saw my ad sitting there on one of them with only 4-5 others beside it.

Still didn't put 2 and 2 together. But read the author blurb and Gandhi was in it. Mystery solved.

I think that one keyword generated 100k impressions in just one week. Then I got bumped as the algos kicked in and swamped the carousel with a ton of ads. 


Offline LilyBLily

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Re: AMS Ads Learning
« Reply #1024 on: June 17, 2017, 09:44:30 PM »

I think that one keyword generated 100k impressions in just one week. Then I got bumped as the algos kicked in and swamped the carousel with a ton of ads.

Did all those clicks get you sales?