Author Topic: AMS Ads Learning  (Read 116959 times)  

Offline edwardgtalbot

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Re: AMS Ads Learning
« Reply #150 on: March 13, 2017, 08:17:03 AM »
Great data, thanks Declan. Everything you mention I have either seen or have not seen but have not seen the opposite either. I've had two ads running for 15 days now for two books. Both books same genre (action thriller), both $4.99, both 20-25 reviews averaging 4 or more, both in Kindle Select. The same 200 keywords, all bidding at 52 cents.

One book has 147,000 impressions and  174 clicks. The other had 106,000 impressions and 71 clicks. Average CPC is around 30 cents. The first book has two sales. The second book has four plus a paperback. The first book has several thousand page reads during that time also, while the second book has only a few hundred. Including the page reads, the second book is breaking even and the first book has lost about $30.

Clearly my click-through rate is better on book one. I would say the sales+borrows per click can't be any higher than book two, though, based on observing rankings changes. So it probably does look at both click through rate and conversion rate.

It also seems likely that I need to work on my ad copy for book two.
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Offline AlexaKang

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Re: AMS Ads Learning
« Reply #151 on: March 13, 2017, 09:17:34 AM »
No, I mean don't waste much time checking the positioning of your keyword ads. I might see your ad on page 4 of the carousel and you might see it on page 1. Amazon uses its algorithms to determine how to display ads. So making a decision based on where you see it would be mostly folly. Possibly for books and searches with very few bidders, there would be more consistency from reader to reader, and it might be more useful. But in that case only if you're really getting results. You have to decide whether the time spent doing so is going to get you the sales you need for it to be worth the time. Certainly once you're paying 20 cents or more per click (and likely bidding over 30), it means there are enough bidders out there that the location you see will not be all that consistent across readers.


I used to think that too but I'm not sure it's true. Yes each site visitor might see a different set of books on the carousel based on his buying records, but as far as placement in the carousel goes, my observation is that higher bid does move the book up to p.1 or p.2. I've tested this with multiple ISPs after clearing all cache and history in the same browser and different browsers. Also, I don't just observe my own book, but a couple of other fellow authors I know who are running ads too. And I've seen positive results when I up the bids on my ad when it fell to p. 3 and later on the carousel to move them up. Coincidence? Maybe. But could be bid tweaking too.

I really have no idea how to make use of the info given on the AMS sales reports. I just don't think they accurately reflect the results based on what I see from the dashboard. Even if they say this one book is getting me clicks or no clicks, I don't find that I can rely on that info. I've tried pausing ads that appear to be click bait, but immediately see a sales dip effect. I run them again and sales resume even though the report is not showing any sales. What gives? Who knows.




Offline edwardgtalbot

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Re: AMS Ads Learning
« Reply #152 on: March 13, 2017, 09:29:46 AM »
I used to think that too but I'm not sure it's true. Yes each site visitor might see a different set of books on the carousel based on his buying records, but as far as placement in the carousel goes, my observation is that higher bid does move the book up to p.1 or p.2. I've tested this with multiple ISPs after clearing all cache and history in the same browser and different browsers. Also, I don't just observe my own book, but a couple of other fellow authors I know who are running ads too. And I've seen positive results when I up the bids on my ad when it fell to p. 3 and later on the carousel to move them up. Coincidence? Maybe. But could be bid tweaking too.
I think maybe I wasn't clear. Absolutely raising your bid is likely to move you up the carousel. But unless you're bidding very high (relative to the popularity of the page/book), you can't just look at the carousel and make assumptions about where it will appear for other users. My main point was don't get hung up on that. It's your impressions, clicks, and sales that will tell you whether your bid needs to go up or down, not where you see the book on the carousel. You can't really learn anything definitive from looking at the carousel that you can't figure from the other data. I almost never look at the carousel unless I see unusual behavior like a spike in a keyword impressions or something.
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Offline AlexaKang

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Re: AMS Ads Learning
« Reply #153 on: March 13, 2017, 09:32:49 AM »
I think maybe I wasn't clear. Absolutely raising your bid is likely to move you up the carousel. But unless you're bidding very high (relative to the popularity of the page/book), you can't just look at the carousel and make assumptions about where it will appear for other users. My main point was don't get hung up on that. It's your impressions, clicks, and sales that will tell you whether your bid needs to go up or down, not where you see the book on the carousel. You can't really learn anything definitive from looking at the carousel that you can't figure from the other data. I almost never look at the carousel unless I see unusual behavior like a spike in a keyword impressions or something.

Edward I do know what you're saying. Problem is my experience is that I find I can't learn anything definitive from the AMS reports. What I do is in fact look at my ad's carousel placement and up the bid every time I see it falling out of p.2 of a book I want to be visible on. I'm not recommending my method to anyone else since I can't guarantee anything on it, but it's worked for me so far.

Offline AlexaKang

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Re: AMS Ads Learning
« Reply #154 on: March 13, 2017, 09:40:14 AM »
Another thing I've been doing that is going in a different direction than what some of you guys are saying is I'm running 3 ads on the same book. Does it have any negative impact? I don't know. If there is, I haven't noticed it. One ad is specifically targeted to a very precise genre that is my exact own genre. For that one I have a higher daily maximum. The second one is for cross genre books -- readers who are looking at books that have some similarities to mine. I have a lower daily maximum for that one and as expected the resulting impressions and clicks are lower, but as far as percentage ROI, both ads are the same. 50% spend of my total sales. (Note though that I bid quite high as this book is my loss leader and my goal is sell-throughs rather than this book).

I recently began a 3rd campaign and moved all the KWS of books and authors in my specific genre which are very low in ranking (like 400K and higher). I want my book to still show up on those pages whenever those books get viewed, but I don't want them taking up one of my 1000 KW spaces and competing for spent on my main campaign. I feel like in this case the low impressions have less to do with my ad than the fact that these books overall have very low browsers and buyers, but I want to maximize my visibility and it's very easy to do since they usually have low number of books on the carousel. For this campaign I set my daily maximum to only $1 and can bid at $.15 per ad, get the advantage to the rare and occasional views, and still never reacn the daily max.

Offline edwardgtalbot

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Re: AMS Ads Learning
« Reply #155 on: March 13, 2017, 09:47:00 AM »
Edward I do know what you're saying. Problem is my experience is that I find I can't learn anything definitive from the AMS reports. What I do is in fact look at my ad's carousel placement and up the bid every time I see it falling out of p.2 of a book I want to be visible on. I'm not recommending my method to anyone else since I can't guarantee anything on it, but it's worked for me so far.
Alexa - certainly I can see that doing some good. When you say it's "worked", how do you define "worked"? Are you basing that on impressions, clicks, sales, what? And when are you looking at the numbers? Unless you're checking the carousel hourly or something, won't the impressions have started dropping by the time you check the carousel and then raise your bid.

The only data you have to determine whether it "worked" is the very data I'm suggesting you should mostly use instead of checking the carousel.
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Offline Cassie Leigh

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Re: AMS Ads Learning
« Reply #156 on: March 13, 2017, 10:49:59 AM »
I don't look at the carousel at all.  Each time you go to a product page it's a new auction so it's not static.  It's about who else is bidding when you are and what they're bidding and that can change throughout the day.

In terms of running multiple ads, I have three running right now on the same book with virtually identical ad copy and even fairly similar keywords.  One has been running forever, one for a few months now, and one is my "winners" ad that only includes the keywords that have generated sales for me to-date.  I paused the "losers" ad that had all my no/low impression keywords just because it was getting expensive with no sales due to the low number of impressions on each keyword and therefore clicks per word.  As far as I can see, having multiple ads doesn't create issues with each one continuing to run and generate impressions/clicks/sales.  I think I have brought it down to one ad a few times, but it didn't make a noticeable difference so then I reactivated the others or started new ones.


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Offline AlexaKang

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Re: AMS Ads Learning
« Reply #157 on: March 13, 2017, 10:50:18 AM »
Alexa - certainly I can see that doing some good. When you say it's "worked", how do you define "worked"? Are you basing that on impressions, clicks, sales, what? And when are you looking at the numbers? Unless you're checking the carousel hourly or something, won't the impressions have started dropping by the time you check the carousel and then raise your bid.

The only data you have to determine whether it "worked" is the very data I'm suggesting you should mostly use instead of checking the carousel.

Put it this way, my sales begin to slow down. I then check my carousel placements on the most popular books I target for placement. Usually, it's because those books now have risen in ranking and/or the number of sponsored ads on their page has increased and my book has fallen to p.3 or 4. I up my bid on those books, my placement go back to p. 1 & 2, and sales go back up to normal rate.

I can't say there's any scientific proof that this means everyone else is seeing my ad on p. 1 or 2. I do test the placement both when I'm logged in and when I'm logged out, along with using different ISPs after clearing cache & history.

I think for sure the algo supposedly try to tailor what they show, but from my own observation, that's more when they do a overhaul and rotate books, rather than pushing a particular ad up or down the carousel. Seems to me the placement on the carousel itself is in fact determined by bidding price. For example, there are 3 authros (or an unrelated genre) who for inexplicable reasons are heavily favored by Amazon. Their books are always the first set to show up in all new releases in the books I target based on genre. I also know these ads' bidding prices are very low. I punch in the KW and set my bidding price at $.10 and always I'll be able to jump the queue above them, until other ads start to come in and push my ad down. So I'm constantly having to check and see how many new ads are populating and adjust my price from there.

Another thing that throws a curve ball is, 1/3 of the time Amazon won't show my ad on the ebook page, or my ad is buried somewhere on the ebook carousel, but I'm on p.1 for the paperback. So that makes determining what's going on even harder.

Offline edwardgtalbot

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Re: AMS Ads Learning
« Reply #158 on: March 13, 2017, 11:06:16 AM »
Put it this way, my sales begin to slow down. I then check my carousel placements on the most popular books I target for placement. Usually, it's because those books now have risen in ranking and/or the number of sponsored ads on their page has increased and my book has fallen to p.3 or 4. I up my bid on those books, my placement go back to p. 1 & 2, and sales go back up to normal rate.

Do impressions and clicks go down as well, when your sales begin to slow down?
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Offline AlexaKang

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Re: AMS Ads Learning
« Reply #159 on: March 13, 2017, 11:22:49 AM »
Do impressions and clicks go down as well, when your sales begin to slow down?

Honestly, I can't tell. The KWs with highest impressions and clicks don't slow down, but a lot of times the change in carousel placements aren't even books of those KWs. For the applicable KWs themselves, I gave up tracking them because at least for me, I often don't see a correlation. My placement can be anywhere from p.1-4, but often it looks like there are only impressions in the 3 digit or not a lot of clicks. I don't really see a lot of movement in clicks and impressions except for my top 6 KWs. But this can't be right because I am making sales from the ads. That's why I do't rely on AMS reports anymore, or at least I don't know what to make of the data. I look at my data report and I see a lot of 1 sale for many KWs.

One thing I am sure of is that the AMS ads are in fact driving my sales. Last week I terminated my credit card, and completely forgot it was the card I used to pay for the AMS ads. Amazon suspended all my campaigns and notified me but I missed their email. Took me a couple of days to realize this and during that time, my sales nosedived to 0-1 sales per day. Took me another 2 days to link a new credit card and let the ads do its thing again. Now those sheik romances sell very well, but I also think they are selling well BECAUSE Amazon keeps favoring their ads.

So, for me anyway, the AMS reports really aren't helping.


ETA: Another thing is, and this is a different matter, even on KWs where I do extremely well sometimes (we're talking impressions into the 5 digits, double digit click rates plus sales), Amazon would sometimes for reasons I can't understand rotate my ad out and stop showing it on those KWs. You'd think the algo would see this book is working and continue to run it, but no they don't. Instead, suddenly a bunch of books of a totally unrelated genre with minimal bid prices would take over. (I know their bid prices, they're the same sheik romances that bid at 3-5c). Why I have no idea.
« Last Edit: March 13, 2017, 11:26:57 AM by AlexaKang »

Offline Gregg Bell

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Re: AMS Ads Learning
« Reply #160 on: March 13, 2017, 11:40:32 AM »
No, I mean don't waste much time checking the positioning of your keyword ads. I might see your ad on page 4 of the carousel and you might see it on page 1. Amazon uses its algorithms to determine how to display ads. So making a decision based on where you see it would be mostly folly. Possibly for books and searches with very few bidders, there would be more consistency from reader to reader, and it might be more useful. But in that case only if you're really getting results. You have to decide whether the time spent doing so is going to get you the sales you need for it to be worth the time. Certainly once you're paying 20 cents or more per click (and likely bidding over 30), it means there are enough bidders out there that the location you see will not be all that consistent across readers.

The way you tell if a keyword is working is looking at impressions and clicks and conversions, with conversions of course being significantly delayed and possibly incomplete. If you're going to raise and lower bids, that's what it should primarily be based on. And I don't have any specific advice on when to raise or lower bids. Like everyone else, I experiment some with it. But I haven't yet seen any "system" of doing it that seems likely to be reliable, despite individuals having had some success with certain systems.

Thanks for the explanation. :)

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Offline Gregg Bell

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Re: AMS Ads Learning
« Reply #161 on: March 13, 2017, 11:45:28 AM »
1. No, Amazon won't tell you if they're shutting you down. The only way you can tell is when impressions slow/stop. In your situation, however, it's difficult to tell because you didn't say if the impressions had slowed. Did you get most (or all) of the 536 in the first day? Then perhaps so, although I think it's a bit soon for AMS to shut things down. It could be that your bids are too low and you're simply getting buried on the back pages for most of your keywords.

2.  What's the best strategy? Wish I knew. The only thing I could suggest it to raise your bids for a day (or two) to see if it makes a difference. Also, do a search (preferably as an unregistered user) on some of the keywords to see how you're positioned. It could help you to zero in on a good bid price.

3. Start a new campaign? That's what Amazon suggested. I tried it once and it bombed worse than my first one. My best result came when I waited a week before starting it again.

Overall, the wild card is the performance algorithm. AMS won't explain how it works (no surprise), so we're left guessing at what to do in order to keep a campaign effective. To me, it's more like trying to play poker with a deck of cards that constantly changes. You might be holding all four aces, but the other players have better hands - with additional aces.       

Thanks Bruce. I think I was panicking a bit. (I always think they're singling me out for egregious incompetence.) No, the impressions seem to be fairly consistent, just no clicks. I'm taking your advice on upping the bids and seeing what happens.

P.S. LOVE the poker with a deck of cards that constantly changes analogy.

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Offline Gregg Bell

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Re: AMS Ads Learning
« Reply #162 on: March 13, 2017, 11:50:24 AM »
Here are some figures. Not sure what to make of them, or how they compare with your own.

                   Impressions          Clicks  % of clicks to imp        sales          % of sales to clicks.     Average Bid cost       ACOS              Keywords

Book one:     905,299               801             0.09%               87 units               10.86%                  $0.08              25.83%                    404 
 
Book two:     765,997               355             0.05%               20 units                 5.63%                  $0.06              38.36%                    687

Book three:   749,453               337             0.04%               21 units                 6.23%                  $0.07              36.84%                    476

Book four:    529,227               279             0.05%               21 units                 7.53%                  $0.06              24.88%                    471

Book five      351,449              281              0.08%               14 units                 4.98%                  $0.03              22.15%                    354

================================================================================
TOTALS      3,301,425           2,053             0.06%                184 units                 8.96%                   ????              25.00%


Note: I haven't ever stopped any of my ads and started them again as new ads, I have only paused them if I had a promo for say 1 day, and impressions have kicked off again when released back on sale.I have however, increased/reduced bids, and added or removed keywords, but basically I just now let it run and have done for some time. I understand the more data they have, the more likely they are to keep on giving impressions (to a point)

The only thing I have noticed is that if I run a free day promo and end up with sales giving me a better rank, I also seem to pick up sales on my AMS for that book, but once the rank falls back, sales are few and far between on AMS.

Also my book that has had most sales organically without ads, has picked up the most sales on AMS. So I'm thinking rank has something to do with clicks converting to sales in the reader's mind. At the moment it doesn't have a good rank and sales are slow for it on AMS, yet impressions soldier on.

I don't hold with the idea that they stop impressions forever if the don't produce clicks. Okay, they put a temp hold on it a week or so into a new ad and intermittenly after that while they assess the data, I've experienced that. I have one with over 5,000 clicks on a Stephen King book and no clicks, but I still keep getting impressions. I have many more examples like this.

The other thing I note is that book 2 & 3 aren't performing as well as book one, yet the impressions which were well down on book 1 (as much as 50% down) are fast catching up with that book. So that debunks the idea that they stop poorer performing ads, unless they only stop those with a rank bad ACOS that makes a loss to save us from ourselves.

Thanks Decon. The data really helps. And wow, your average bid cost is so low. Seems like if I don't bid (and I'm in thrillers too) at least .15 I get almost no action.

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Re: AMS Ads Learning
« Reply #163 on: March 13, 2017, 05:49:12 PM »
Thanks Decon. The data really helps. And wow, your average bid cost is so low. Seems like if I don't bid (and I'm in thrillers too) at least .15 I get almost no action.

I don't know what to say. All I know is that I don't chase book page positions (the  carousel) as some call it. Like others have said, every time someone clicks on a book that has ads, it's a new bidding process with the algos. Some pull out as they set up new campaigns, or just get rotated out, and so I must sneak in there at times. The thing is, it took 3 months for me to get any sort of results with the same campaign and I've just sort of stuck with my bids since then, not wanting to play the bidding war. I do think that reading posts over the last 3 months, many expect too much too soon and get hurt by keep stopping campaigns that haven't had a chance to get going and devolop data at Amazon's end and then they've started new ones which doesn't give them a chance to produce, but that helps me.

Also with people constantly looking at their results and cancelling none performing keywords, as opposed to campaigns, on ones where I have bid low, then it ups my chances of a click and a sale by staying constant and those make up for my higher bids.

As for not getting impressions, I listed all Erik Von Danikan's books and similar for The Killers Amongst Us: Chimera Dawn Chronicles, my lowest impression and sales book in AMS. The reason was that my story  is in line with his theory of Ancient God's as aliens, especially Egyptian god's,though his stories are more textbooks. Think X-files for mine;/ mystery crime, so I struggle to slot it into an exact category of books for keywords as it crosses genre, hence I don't have many keywords that are an exact match. I thought I'd do well with his books, but I paused them all when I realized I wasn't getting one impression on them. Obviously, your meta data has to have a match or AMS will ignore your keyword in some instance, though how cook books get on my pages I'll never know, unless they are keyord stuffing out of genre at upload for that purpose. Sometimes it can happen if you are an exact match, but you meta data differs from the choosen book, so you get no impressions.

It really is all a mystery.
« Last Edit: March 13, 2017, 06:22:42 PM by Decon »


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Offline edwardgtalbot

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Re: AMS Ads Learning
« Reply #164 on: March 13, 2017, 05:58:56 PM »
I do think that reading posts over the last 3 months, many expect too much too soon and get hurt by keep stopping campaigns that haven't had a chance to get going and devolop data at Amazon's end and then they've started new ones which doesn't give them a chance to produce, but that helps me.

This is perhaps the most valuable observation of this entire thread. So few people have let non-performing ads run longer than 2-3 weeks that a lot of what we think is "data" is incomplete. I am very guilty of this myself and am beginning to rectify it.

That said, two of my book ads seem to convert well enough that I am more than happy to pay .20 cents per click (bidding in the 30's). So I am still torn about whether I should bid really low on keyword ads. Given that I now intend to let them run longer, I could go quite a while without results before I figure out whether my action thrillers really do require me to bid in the .30's. I know the romance folks almost all have to bid high to get results.
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Re: AMS Ads Learning
« Reply #165 on: March 13, 2017, 06:28:25 PM »
Yes to staying the course. I think it took me nearly two months to decide to up the daily spend on one of my ads. It was doing okay, but nothing spectacular. Then I upped the spend and upped it again, and the book is moving a lot faster, plus it's selling the second book in the series and there is a visibly higher number of page reads that more than compensates for the higher ad cost. The book now ranks at 24k, much more visible in the Amazon store--if you believe that anything is visible at all beyond the first 100 in a genre, that is.

Interestingly, when my daily spend limit was $1 or $2, it never got used up. Since I raised it to a whopping $9, the money does sometimes get spent. When that happens I push it up a dollar (big spender!).


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Re: AMS Ads Learning
« Reply #166 on: March 13, 2017, 06:48:32 PM »
This is perhaps the most valuable observation of this entire thread. So few people have let non-performing ads run longer than 2-3 weeks that a lot of what we think is "data" is incomplete. I am very guilty of this myself and am beginning to rectify it.

That said, two of my book ads seem to convert well enough that I am more than happy to pay .20 cents per click (bidding in the 30's). So I am still torn about whether I should bid really low on keyword ads. Given that I now intend to let them run longer, I could go quite a while without results before I figure out whether my action thrillers really do require me to bid in the .30's. I know the romance folks almost all have to bid high to get results.

I really don't know the answer.

All I know is that I can't control what Amazon know and I don't, so I don't try to second guess. I only have my own data that I've posted and garnered over quite a number of months. I start by knowing I only have 70% royalty ($2) to play with for the ACOS and a small % of  of actual page reads income. I did a previous post how I calculated this after working it out as a percentage of AMS sales to non-AMS sales rather than considering them all attributed to AMS, which I would consider it like fools gold to apply all page reads.

From the data I've posted, I don't need to know what Amazon are upto, or where I sit on the pages. I can quickly work out from overall results or individual campaigns how increased bids would bite into my ACOS if I didn't increase sales and increasing bids only guarantees early pages not clicks and sales, but it ensures higher costs. Regardless, my click to buy ratio would likely stay the same (Think on that a moment). It wouldn't take much of an increase across the board to soon get to a 70% + ACOS, so I always keep that in mind rather than starting from high bid pricing to get impressions that I know will end up  producing a loss at my sale price of $2.99 as many have shown by posting their data on here, albeit from short term campaigns.

As an example, If my average bid cost is 8c (Which means bidding more in some instances), then I have a 25-1 click rate to buy, to eat up all my royalty.

If you apply that to my data on the previous page, in relation to % clicks to sales, then it's obvious I will make a profit @ an actual cost of 6 - 8c, so 15c bids are not out of the question, so long as the don't cost me that.

If however, I bid 50c and I'm charged say 25c then it translates to a 8-1 click rate to sale to eat up my royalty. So the way I look at it is that if I don't want to make a profit, I should bid 50c because I am not getting that ratio of clicks to sales for it to work. God forbid if I bid 52 cents and I was charged 50c, which would mean it would take only a ratio of 4-1 to eat up my royalty.

I'm tired so I hope I have the math right and that I am making sense. Bear in mind that I am shy of bidding higher as I didn't get the sort of results in increased sales when I increased bids as the previous post to this enjoyed to increase(or is that decrease) my click to buy ratio for the better. Also note I have no series as they are all standalones.

You can only determine your click to buy ratio with a long term campaign. For me, that ratio determines my bid price and not the pack chasing a front page. I still get sales from ad placement down the pecking order, just not as many as if I'd bid higher.

There is a contra argument to this as a strategy, but this post is too long already.
« Last Edit: March 13, 2017, 07:54:07 PM by Decon »


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Re: AMS Ads Learning
« Reply #167 on: March 13, 2017, 07:28:02 PM »
Decon, you've inspired me to try an experiment.  Most of my ads for my fantasy book have had bids from 25 cents to 40 cents and done fairly well, but I took one I'd paused and changed all of the bids down to 10 cents a word with a low per-day spend and I'm just going to let it run and see what it does for a month or so.  Basically, see if it captures any impressions and clicks or not.  Right now it has about 38,000 impressions and 40 clicks with one sale at $6.99.  I'll see where it goes from here and report back.


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Re: AMS Ads Learning
« Reply #168 on: March 13, 2017, 08:00:51 PM »
Decon, you've inspired me to try an experiment.  Most of my ads for my fantasy book have had bids from 25 cents to 40 cents and done fairly well, but I took one I'd paused and changed all of the bids down to 10 cents a word with a low per-day spend and I'm just going to let it run and see what it does for a month or so.  Basically, see if it captures any impressions and clicks or not.  Right now it has about 38,000 impressions and 40 clicks with one sale at $6.99.  I'll see where it goes from here and report back.

Thanks for that. I would be really interesting to see what your resuts are in a few months time.  Fingers crossed.


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Re: AMS Ads Learning
« Reply #169 on: March 13, 2017, 08:34:26 PM »
Hello all,

I love this thread and I find it extremely helpful. I have many questions I would like to ask, but for the time being I have one crucial question. How do you track the performance of your ads campaigns? Do you use a spreadsheet? Also, for keyword campaigns, do you track performance daily of each keyword or the whole campaign?

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Re: AMS Ads Learning
« Reply #170 on: March 14, 2017, 09:16:15 AM »
Interestingly, when my daily spend limit was $1 or $2, it never got used up. Since I raised it to a whopping $9, the money does sometimes get spent. When that happens I push it up a dollar (big spender!).

That's is indeed interesting.  If that could be repeated consistently, it could provide the answer to how to scale up successful campaigns.  Couldn't be that simple though, could it, since most of what the AMS algorithm does is such a mystery.

Has anyone else had a similar experience with raising their daily spend limit?

Philip
« Last Edit: March 14, 2017, 09:19:10 AM by Philip Gibson »

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Re: AMS Ads Learning
« Reply #171 on: March 14, 2017, 10:18:12 AM »
That's is indeed interesting.  If that could be repeated consistently, it could provide the answer to how to scale up successful campaigns.  Couldn't be that simple though, could it, since most of what the AMS algorithm does is such a mystery.

Has anyone else had a similar experience with raising their daily spend limit?

Philip

No, but I'll be the guinea pig/canary. Two of my ads had a daily spend of $5 and one had $3, I don't remember why. But, in the interest of science, I raised the $3 to $5.


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Re: AMS Ads Learning
« Reply #172 on: March 14, 2017, 10:53:37 AM »
No, but I'll be the guinea pig/canary. Two of my ads had a daily spend of $5 and one had $3, I don't remember why. But, in the interest of science, I raised the $3 to $5.

I'll send my guinea pigs to join your canary with two of my box sets.  I'll run the experiment for 10 days.

Apollo box set:
Current daily limit: $5.00.  Ave no. of clicks over past 10 days = 20 clicks per day. Only ever spends half the daily limit.
Daily limit now raised to $10 for next 10 days.

Kids box set:
Current daily limit: $5.00.  Ave no. of clicks over past 10 days = 88 clicks per day.  Always spends daily limit with 3 or 4 hours to spare.
Daily limit now raised to $8.00 for next 10 days.

Anyone else in for this and other group experiments from which we could hopefully draw real conclusions?


Philip
« Last Edit: March 14, 2017, 11:45:34 AM by Philip Gibson »

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Re: AMS Ads Learning
« Reply #173 on: March 14, 2017, 11:02:31 AM »
No, but I'll be the guinea pig/canary. Two of my ads had a daily spend of $5 and one had $3, I don't remember why. But, in the interest of science, I raised the $3 to $5.

OMG - this would be SO MUCH EASIER to track if the 'zon would give us historical data. Keeping manual records and subtracting out the old numbers to see how you are performing now suuuuuuuxxxx.

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Re: AMS Ads Learning
« Reply #174 on: March 14, 2017, 12:38:11 PM »
Okay, Philip. Ten days it is. Your average daily click rate is way over mine and I only raised my limit to $5. I'll go raise it to $10 right now. In the interests of science, of course.

It looks like reporting is finally catching up to sales. Sort of.


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