Author Topic: Christian authors as fantasy authors?  (Read 3303 times)  

Online Dpock

  • Status: Jane Austen
  • ***
  • Posts: 312
  • Gender: Male
  • Inland Northwest
    • View Profile
Re: Christian authors as fantasy authors?
« Reply #50 on: May 19, 2017, 12:54:50 PM »
Also, it has been my experience that the types of Christians who get offended by books are the ones who are the most worth offending.

Agree, but best done in a way they don't quite grasp.

Ashley Lords

Offline Mari Oliver

  • Status: Arthur Conan Doyle
  • ****
  • Posts: 628
  • Gender: Female
  • Alaska
  • Bitty prawn
    • View Profile
Re: Christian authors as fantasy authors?
« Reply #51 on: May 19, 2017, 01:21:53 PM »
OP: so long as you're comfortable and right with God over your decision, that's all that matters. So, take your time and consider where to go from here. It's the best advice I can give you. Hugs!

Offline Tulonsae

  • Status: Jane Austen
  • ***
  • Posts: 365
  • Gender: Female
    • View Profile
Re: Christian authors as fantasy authors?
« Reply #52 on: May 19, 2017, 02:28:20 PM »
You might be interested in reading "So You Want to Be A Wizard?" It's a series. It's about youths/children. And it's absolutely full of Christian themes. But it has magic. And in a couple of books, they go planet hopping (which was fascinating, actually). Oh, and it's not trying to convert anyone, either. Good books, good stories.

As to your original question, if you're writing Christian fiction and fantasy under the same pen name, I think there is some expectation that it will be relatively clean, and that it will adhere to some basics. Like, for example, it's okay to have a powerful being that others are trying to overthrow. But I wouldn't imply that being is the one true god. I'd indicate that being was a subordinate, a different race, or some being that the one true god (who might not even be in your book) had given free will to. Or something like that. That's pretty much how I read Tolkien's creation myths in the Simarillion.

Offline cebap

  • Status: Madeleine L'Engle
  • **
  • Posts: 76
    • View Profile
Re: Christian authors as fantasy authors?
« Reply #53 on: May 19, 2017, 03:08:31 PM »
I personally think you should just make a new pen name and separate the genres since they have widely different audiences in general.
Graphic Designer by day, Romance/Fantasy Author by night.

Offline MelanieCellier

  • Status: Jane Austen
  • ***
  • Posts: 284
  • Gender: Female
  • Australia
    • View Profile
Re: Christian authors as fantasy authors?
« Reply #54 on: May 19, 2017, 03:46:04 PM »
I did some google searches on the differences between ya and adult fantasy, and it seems to come down to being a simpler language, lower word count, and younger aged characters, generally told in third person. 

I am not any where near having a total word count, though I have enough adventures planned I expect for it end up being several books. I am writing in third person, but I didn't think my language was overly simplistic or overly sophisticated to be honest.

I hope it's ok that I keep picking out the comments on YA - I write YA and often see misunderstandings about it, so it's a topic of interest to me :) If I'm not being helpful, then feel free to tell me you're wanting to keep the conversation focused on the fantasy aspect.

I'm not sure where the third person thing came from, as I would say YA has a higher instance of first person than most other genres (in fact, someone just commented on this in the first v third thread, and I'm in complete agreement). Having said that, there's no problem with writing third. As for lower word count - from what I understand, this used to be enforced by trad but is less and less the case. (Twilight was 120k and isn't epic fantasy or generally regarded by readers to be a doorstopper or anything.)

When it comes to simpler language, I think that's totally up to you and not a necessity, especially since, as an indie, the majority of readers will actually be adults and reading on devices that make looking up words, etc really easy.

Which just leaves the younger-aged characters. That's why I mentioned your protagonist's age in my last post - it seems to be the single consistent/agreed upon aspect that makes something YA. Usually there are also some sort of coming of age themes.

I would suggest that you also consider your content. While there is variance in the genre as to how 'clean' it is, this is an area where I think you're likely to run foul of reviewers and potentially miss your audience if it has graphic...well, pretty much anything :)

Melanie Cellier | Website | Facebook

Online Lauriejoyeltahs

  • Status: Lewis Carroll
  • **
  • Posts: 200
  • Gender: Female
  • Pennsylvania
    • View Profile
Re: Christian authors as fantasy authors?
« Reply #55 on: May 19, 2017, 04:00:43 PM »
I hope it's ok that I keep picking out the comments on YA - I write YA and often see misunderstandings about it, so it's a topic of interest to me :) If I'm not being helpful, then feel free to tell me you're wanting to keep the conversation focused on the fantasy aspect.

I'm not sure where the third person thing came from, as I would say YA has a higher instance of first person than most other genres (in fact, someone just commented on this in the first v third thread, and I'm in complete agreement). Having said that, there's no problem with writing third. As for lower word count - from what I understand, this used to be enforced by trad but is less and less the case. (Twilight was 120k and isn't epic fantasy or generally regarded by readers to be a doorstopper or anything.)

When it comes to simpler language, I think that's totally up to you and not a necessity, especially since, as an indie, the majority of readers will actually be adults and reading on devices that make looking up words, etc really easy.

Which just leaves the younger-aged characters. That's why I mentioned your protagonist's age in my last post - it seems to be the single consistent/agreed upon aspect that makes something YA. Usually there are also some sort of coming of age themes.

I would suggest that you also consider your content. While there is variance in the genre as to how 'clean' it is, this is an area where I think you're likely to run foul of reviewers and potentially miss your audience if it has graphic...well, pretty much anything :)

Your quite alight, I've always considered myself an avid reader, but its only been the last few months that I have really noticed exactly how many genres exist today.  I googled ya just for the purpose of I wasn't really sure what made a book a ya book versus an adult book. My main characters are youngish, 20-30s, but I do have other supporting characters that are much older. I don't have intentions of getting into anything incredibly graphic but I suppose that could change and also be a matter of opinion. I almost wonder if when I am finished, or even before I am if I should try to find some readers to tell me what age group they think it would best be read by.

Offline MelanieCellier

  • Status: Jane Austen
  • ***
  • Posts: 284
  • Gender: Female
  • Australia
    • View Profile
Re: Christian authors as fantasy authors?
« Reply #56 on: May 19, 2017, 05:35:36 PM »
Your quite alight, I've always considered myself an avid reader, but its only been the last few months that I have really noticed exactly how many genres exist today.  I googled ya just for the purpose of I wasn't really sure what made a book a ya book versus an adult book. My main characters are youngish, 20-30s, but I do have other supporting characters that are much older. I don't have intentions of getting into anything incredibly graphic but I suppose that could change and also be a matter of opinion. I almost wonder if when I am finished, or even before I am if I should try to find some readers to tell me what age group they think it would best be read by.

20-30s aren't YA, I'm afraid. You'd need more like 15-18 year olds for that. (Although it's ok to have older supporting characters!) I think a lot of people get confused by this since it's a different age range than is considered 'young adult' in real life (in real life it means 18-30 year olds, in YA as a genre it's more like high school age.)

It's not so much the age group of who reads it that's relevant (as indies, since we mainly sell ebooks to people with credit cards, we're almost certainly going to have mainly adult readers). But if it's a YA read (and they feel it's sufficiently clean) the adult readers will pass it on to their daughters/granddaughters (this is often mentioned in reviews). I think a lot of people like being able to share the reading experience in that way. And lots of adults like the themes and tone and feel of YA books.

Characters in their 20s might fit into New Adult, but New Adult is a much newer and much narrower genre than YA. (YA is a parent category that pretty much has all the other categories under it - i.e. you can have YA fantasy, YA horror, YA contemp romance, etc, but this doesn't seem to be the case with NA. From what I can see, and if I'm wrong hopefully a NA writer can correct me, it's basically YA romance without the content restrictions and often with a college setting.)

In the interests of simpler marketing once you've finished, it's probably a good idea to try to lock down your target market during the process rather than after you've finished :)

Melanie Cellier | Website | Facebook

Online Lauriejoyeltahs

  • Status: Lewis Carroll
  • **
  • Posts: 200
  • Gender: Female
  • Pennsylvania
    • View Profile
Re: Christian authors as fantasy authors?
« Reply #57 on: May 19, 2017, 06:00:45 PM »
In the interests of simpler marketing once you've finished, it's probably a good idea to try to lock down your target market during the process rather than after you've finished :)

That is most certainly true! Gosh I feel like such a newb with all of this genre stuff!

Technically speaking, as I am not very far into the actual writing ( just a few chapters) most of this is still just planning/plotting, and some as I go, I haven't really given the ages yet of the characters so much as I have said "young", "elder of their kind" and the such.
« Last Edit: May 19, 2017, 06:02:43 PM by Lauriejoyeltahs »

Offline JessieCar

  • Status: Arthur Conan Doyle
  • ****
  • Posts: 595
  • Gender: Female
  • UK
    • View Profile
    • shamansland
Re: Christian authors as fantasy authors?
« Reply #58 on: May 19, 2017, 06:06:10 PM »
I think CJ Brightley has an interesting write-up on the subject of noblebright, clean and Christian Fantasy over on her blog. The discussion of noblebright Fantasy is really interesting - I'm sure there are writers on this board who can tell you a lot more about it than me, but CJ writes about it here.

I'd like to echo the poster who mentioned David Gemmell - his Christianity never appears directly in his writing, but his beliefs informed what he wrote, in a non-dogmatic way.
Jessica Rydill | shamansland | Facebook

Offline lmckinley

  • Status: Lewis Carroll
  • **
  • Posts: 242
  • Gender: Female
    • View Profile
    • my blog
Re: Christian authors as fantasy authors?
« Reply #59 on: May 19, 2017, 10:29:00 PM »
I'm going to chime in with my opinion. This is long, but I feel like writing, and have writer's block on my WIP. So I'll just put down everything:)

I started out totally ignorant of genre when I self published a Christian novel and have kinda' sorta' tried to figure it all out after the fact. So here's my take.

First off, about pen names. It's hard to take readers with you to a new genre. Most of them won't be interested simply because they aren't interested in fantasy. To be honest, I don't think it makes much difference whether you use a pen name or not. Those of your current followers who like fantasy will follow you. One or two might try the new book because they like you. Most won't. You will have to find a new audience for the book, regardless of what the author name is. That can be a good thing! But also feels discouraging I'm sure. If you do go with a pen name, you can still mention the new book to your old readers.

regarding Christianity and fantasy:
 I'm a Christian of a pretty conservative stripe. I lost interest in Harry Potter after seeing a reference in one of the movies to reading tea leaves - too close to witchcraft to me, which is pretty clearly forbidden in the Bible. I haven't watched any of the movies after that. I know Christians who rave about Harry Potter though. I assume most Christians simply don't know enough about witchcraft, (and I know very little), to recognize what's there. But I only read two of the books, so my opinion on HP isn't worth much.

I do enjoy some fantasy, Tolkein and Lewis in particular, but haven't read much contemporary Christian fantasy.
You may find that readers who have read Christian fantasy books - and didn't like them - may be put off when they see you have also written Christian books. Some readers are very particular about the least hint of Christianity in their books and will not read a book for that reason. If I were you, I would not bother with a pen name and not bother with those readers either. There are some Christian readers who will be thrilled to find a new Christian fantasy title. I'd try to pick up those people instead. But that's just me. I haven't done any market research; just going with my own thoughts about things. If you do hope to market it alongside your Christian books, I would become acquainted with what's typical of Christian fantasy in recent years.

Some Christians will have nothing to do with fantasy, just as some Christians refuse to listen to secular music, but this varies so much in evangelicalism, depending on where you are coming from. I'll go out on a limb and say it is a vocal minority in my experience.

IMHO, in a fantasy novel, the magic is often intrinsic to the characters and the world. (Think of Gandalf and the elves in LOTR. Their magic is just who they are.) It is not manipulation of the powers in our world, or an attempt to possess powers they were not born with. This is more of an appeal to the magic of fairy tales, rather than active witchcraft. I agree that steering clear of obvious witchcraft themes and terms would help you if you want to appeal to a Christian audience.

As I understand it, a lot of Christian fiction does have some kind of divine figure in place in their fantasy world. A while back I saw this book mentioned, [url=http://Cast of Stones]Cast of Stones[/url], and one of the reviewers suggested it handled the theological frame work well, so there's an example to check out. (Sorry, I never did read it myself.)

As far as beings overthrowing their Creator - Sounds more Greek than Christian. The thought that came to my mind was casting a Satan figure as the perceived Creator. He might even be a kind of false god, an evil spirit who has deceived those he claimed to create. (The apostle Paul called it demon worship to sacrifice to idols. And he spent a lot of time talking to Greeks, who were worshiping Zeus, who supposedly overthrew his father...) I think if you subtly planted some seeds of doubt close to the beginning, you know, about who this creator really is, and installed a true Creator in the resolution of the story, it could work really well. But of course not knowing your story idea, this could be totally incompatible with the tale you have in mind. Just thought I'd throw that out there.

I disagree that there are fantasy elements in the Bible, by the way. I consider things like the parting of the Red Sea, not to mention the resurrection of Christ, to be miracles, an act that only God can do, using the powers we know that he has, (giving life, controlling weather, etc.) I consider magic, even in a 'white' or fairy tale sense, to be completely different. Although....C.S. Lewis uses magic as an attribute of Aslan, a sort of stand in for spiritual power, both good and bad. So I guess you could think of it that way. But Lewis's books have a strong allegory component to them, even if it wasn't intended that way. This allegorical model has shaped Christian fantasy quite a bit and may, in fact, be unavoidable. You'd have to study the genre to know.
 
Anyway, good luck with your project. In my writing and my life, I strive to give glory to God. I fall short at times for sure, but that's the goal. I think if you do that to the best of your ability, you can't go too far wrong.

Online Alix Adale

  • Status: Lewis Carroll
  • **
  • Posts: 100
  • Pacific Northwest
  • Paranormal passion--embrace the night.
    • View Profile
    • alixadale.com
Re: Christian authors as fantasy authors?
« Reply #60 on: May 19, 2017, 11:50:09 PM »
God loves, man kills.


Fire is Magic: 80%

Dawn is Magic: 5%

Paranormal passion--embrace the night.
Alix Adale | website | newsletter | twitter | goodreads

Offline This_Way_Down

  • Status: Arthur Conan Doyle
  • ****
  • Posts: 550
    • View Profile
Re: Christian authors as fantasy authors?
« Reply #61 on: May 20, 2017, 03:19:35 AM »
I would keep it separate. Your fantasy fans probably won't care, but the readers of Christian based fiction might - some of them anyway. Those who do can be quite vocal about it. Better to save yourself the aggravation.

Online Joseph Malik

  • Status: Jane Austen
  • ***
  • Posts: 352
  • Gender: Male
  • Pacific Northwest
    • View Profile
    • Writing and Fighting with Joseph Malik
Re: Christian authors as fantasy authors?
« Reply #62 on: May 20, 2017, 08:52:37 AM »
Dragon's Trail: 100%

The New Magic - Words: 100%

The New Magic - Immersion, Conflict, Motivations, Subplots, Chemistry, Distinct Character Voices, Pacing, Dialogue, Phrasing, Character Development, Atmosphere, Allegory, Polemic, Imagery, Research, Suspension of Disbelief: 30%
Dragon's Trail available on September 30th, 2016.
Writing and Fighting with Joseph Malik | Website | Blog| Mailing List

Offline Mari Oliver

  • Status: Arthur Conan Doyle
  • ****
  • Posts: 628
  • Gender: Female
  • Alaska
  • Bitty prawn
    • View Profile
Re: Christian authors as fantasy authors?
« Reply #63 on: May 20, 2017, 09:43:03 AM »
I would keep it separate. Your fantasy fans probably won't care, but the readers of Christian based fiction might - some of them anyway. Those who do can be quite vocal about it. Better to save yourself the aggravation.
See, this is what I'm saying. I know there are other authors who successfully publish under one name but I didn't find that to be the case for me. I write romance...but for two VERY distinct audiences. It just made sense to make up a new name (and honestly, it's kind of fun being incognito).

Also, OP, I came across this article yesterday and thought it might be of some use to you: http://jrsinclair.com/articles/2016/why-christians-should-write-fantasy/

Fantasy fiction (and fiction in general) is a way of communicating with others intellectually via emotions. Placing good messages in your work, ones that honor the Lord, can totally be done writing fantasy. In the past, I struggled with understanding how to balance fantasy and my love for the Lord (which is why I took a mini break and have been writing western bride romance) but it comes down to this: glorify Him not darkness. My fantasy stories are romance. Sex within the context of marriage (but I write clean for the most part), magic that causes more trouble than helps, dark forces that get defeated, etc. So, OP, I extend my private message box if you ever have any questions. I've been writing fantasy much longer than westerns and it's my favorite genre, so I can direct you to some wholesome and clean fantasy books that might be up your alley for study. <3

P.S.
My statement about the Bible having fantastical elements was meant to be lighthearted, same as when my husband jokingly calls his sandals "air Jehovahs". Christian jokes and whatnot. God delights in our joy, does He not? :)
« Last Edit: May 20, 2017, 09:45:33 AM by Mari Oliver »

Online Lauriejoyeltahs

  • Status: Lewis Carroll
  • **
  • Posts: 200
  • Gender: Female
  • Pennsylvania
    • View Profile
Re: Christian authors as fantasy authors?
« Reply #64 on: May 20, 2017, 11:57:24 AM »
See, this is what I'm saying. I know there are other authors who successfully publish under one name but I didn't find that to be the case for me. I write romance...but for two VERY distinct audiences. It just made sense to make up a new name (and honestly, it's kind of fun being incognito).

Also, OP, I came across this article yesterday and thought it might be of some use to you: http://jrsinclair.com/articles/2016/why-christians-should-write-fantasy/

Fantasy fiction (and fiction in general) is a way of communicating with others intellectually via emotions. Placing good messages in your work, ones that honor the Lord, can totally be done writing fantasy. In the past, I struggled with understanding how to balance fantasy and my love for the Lord (which is why I took a mini break and have been writing western bride romance) but it comes down to this: glorify Him not darkness. My fantasy stories are romance. Sex within the context of marriage (but I write clean for the most part), magic that causes more trouble than helps, dark forces that get defeated, etc. So, OP, I extend my private message box if you ever have any questions. I've been writing fantasy much longer than westerns and it's my favorite genre, so I can direct you to some wholesome and clean fantasy books that might be up your alley for study. <3

P.S.
My statement about the Bible having fantastical elements was meant to be lighthearted, same as when my husband jokingly calls his sandals "air Jehovahs". Christian jokes and whatnot. God delights in our joy, does He not? :)


Thank I certainly appreciate it and I am sure that I will certainly be in contact !

Offline lmckinley

  • Status: Lewis Carroll
  • **
  • Posts: 242
  • Gender: Female
    • View Profile
    • my blog
Re: Christian authors as fantasy authors?
« Reply #65 on: May 20, 2017, 01:41:16 PM »
Just wanted to add that I didn't mean anything personal to anyone about the fantasy/miracle distinction. Just one of those semantic things that matter to me, if to no one else:)

I'd also like to recommend Mike Duran's blog. www.mikeduran.com He's now focusing on self-publishing for the secular market, but he's written a lot on sci-fi and fantasy in the Christian market and has had a lot of interesting things to say on the subject. At least I think it's interesting. But he may be a little bit of an outsider. As I said, this isn't my genre, so you can take my thoughts with a big grain of salt.

For me personally, I don't have a lot of time and write slow, so a new pen name would be a big deal for me to start and maintain. But you probably have more time to invest in what your doing, and maybe a new pen name suits your needs best.

Offline Victoria Evers

  • Status: Dr. Seuss
  • *
  • Posts: 7
    • View Profile
Re: Christian authors as fantasy authors?
« Reply #66 on: May 20, 2017, 02:09:36 PM »
Very interesting. Christian readers aren't turned off by fantasy in itself. It's more in the content and message the book is conveying.

It's not uncommon for authors expanding out to different genres to use another pen name. Yes, you may be losing the fan base you've built, but if you doubt the fantasy book will have the same appeal to your current readers, then you could potentially be opening the door to negative feedback from those very same people. It all depends on the content of your book. Which author better reflects your own tone? C.S. Lewis or George R. R. Martin? That's the question. If your books are like the "A Song of Fire and Ice" series, with strong language, sexual content, and gratuitous violence, then I'd definitely look into getting a new pen name.

Your novel may be a different genre, but is the ultimate message or underlying tone THAT dissimilar from your previous work? As others have mentioned, Christian writers find great success writing fantasy, because Christian readers LOVE books like "Chronicles of Narnia," "Lord of the Rings," and modern-day young adult fantasy books like Mary Weber's "Storm Siren." If your book falls into this category, then I'd say it's still a safe bet to keep your current name. It's all a question of content.

Victoria Evers | Blog | Facebook | Newsletter

Offline EBWriter

  • Status: Madeleine L'Engle
  • **
  • Posts: 66
  • Gender: Male
  • Tennessee
  • "Do or do not, there is no try." -Yoda
    • View Profile
    • My Official Website & Blog
Re: Christian authors as fantasy authors?
« Reply #67 on: May 20, 2017, 02:12:16 PM »
I know! Husband and I joke all the time about the Bible being a fantasy book:

- rise dead bones in a field
-Ezekiel being whirled off to heaven in a chariot
- the heavens parting and God's Entourage of spheres (spaceship looking things) with angels floating from the sky

I could go on! And yes, I think one can write Christian fiction and fantasy under the same name. You can offend anyone, of faith or not, with anything.


um...that would be Elijah. (2 Kings 2:11)  :D

Offline EBWriter

  • Status: Madeleine L'Engle
  • **
  • Posts: 66
  • Gender: Male
  • Tennessee
  • "Do or do not, there is no try." -Yoda
    • View Profile
    • My Official Website & Blog
Re: Christian authors as fantasy authors?
« Reply #68 on: May 20, 2017, 02:21:58 PM »
One of the best books on the subject of Christian Fiction, IMHO, is Jeff Gerke's The Art & Craft of Writing Christian Fiction: The Complete Guide to Finding Your Story, Honing Your Skills, & Glorifying God in Your Novel. (Note: If you use the Look Inside feature on Amazon, make sure you're viewing the Print edition or all you'll see is the enlarged cover.)


Jeff has been an author and editor of Christian [Speculative] Fiction for years, writing under the name Jefferson Scott. His book is loaded not only with tips on the art and craft of writing in general but ideas like:
  • Writing for an audience of One
  • Understanding your calling as a novelist
  • How to find your story
  • and lots more
Most of the work in his book has been comprised of a huge series of tips on writing Jeff wrote for his own website, so you can check it out before purchasing the book. I'd start there if I were you. Invaluable information.

Offline Mari Oliver

  • Status: Arthur Conan Doyle
  • ****
  • Posts: 628
  • Gender: Female
  • Alaska
  • Bitty prawn
    • View Profile
Re: Christian authors as fantasy authors?
« Reply #69 on: May 20, 2017, 02:35:20 PM »

um...that would be Elijah. (2 Kings 2:11)  :D
Yes, you're right. I recalled that after I posted it but forgot to change it, lol.

Online Lauriejoyeltahs

  • Status: Lewis Carroll
  • **
  • Posts: 200
  • Gender: Female
  • Pennsylvania
    • View Profile
Re: Christian authors as fantasy authors?
« Reply #70 on: May 20, 2017, 02:56:00 PM »
A lot of information for me take in! I have read Tolkien's books, but honestly I am not very familiar with most of the other mentions. I am going to have to try to squeeze some more reading into my schedule for sure .

Offline Mari Oliver

  • Status: Arthur Conan Doyle
  • ****
  • Posts: 628
  • Gender: Female
  • Alaska
  • Bitty prawn
    • View Profile
Re: Christian authors as fantasy authors?
« Reply #71 on: May 21, 2017, 02:19:21 PM »
Just wanted to add that I didn't mean anything personal to anyone about the fantasy/miracle distinction. Just one of those semantic things that matter to me, if to no one else:)
It matters to me as well. I recognize the clear distinction between the Lord's miracles and fantasy. Saying "if to no one else" basically assumes that I don't take it seriously. That stings. A joke is a joke. And even though I feel slightly insulted, I'm going to let it go.

Anyway, I'm posting this final article for the OP, since I've been reading a lot about this very subject myself lately: http://kingdompen.org/magic-fantasy-and-the-christian-writer/

Online Lauriejoyeltahs

  • Status: Lewis Carroll
  • **
  • Posts: 200
  • Gender: Female
  • Pennsylvania
    • View Profile
Re: Christian authors as fantasy authors?
« Reply #72 on: May 21, 2017, 02:26:07 PM »
It matters to me as well. I recognize the clear distinction between the Lord's miracles and fantasy. Saying "if to no one else" basically assumes that I don't take it seriously. That stings. A joke is a joke. And even though I feel slightly insulted, I'm going to let it go.

Anyway, I'm posting this final article for the OP, since I've been reading a lot about this very subject myself lately: http://kingdompen.org/magic-fantasy-and-the-christian-writer/

Thank you! You have been so extremely helpful- I don't want to try to justify my writing, but rather find a way to do it that will stay true to what I believe, without it coming across as being an attempt to evangelize or push my beliefs onto anyone else.

Offline Mari Oliver

  • Status: Arthur Conan Doyle
  • ****
  • Posts: 628
  • Gender: Female
  • Alaska
  • Bitty prawn
    • View Profile
Re: Christian authors as fantasy authors?
« Reply #73 on: May 21, 2017, 02:36:28 PM »
You're welcome! I totally understand your position because the last thing I want to be is preachy. But writing fiction is so powerful and our words have impact. Just a good thing to be aware of and remember. <3

Offline Steve M Author

  • Status: Dr. Seuss
  • *
  • Posts: 7
  • Gender: Male
  • Put the adverb down and back away slowly
    • View Profile
    • A Hole In The Fence
Re: Christian authors as fantasy authors?
« Reply #74 on: May 21, 2017, 02:45:00 PM »
Interesting question:

Let me give you a look from the other perspective.
As an atheist, I don't read fantasy or write it. Anything that includes magic gets an auto-decline from me.

But I don't see the problem with having both under the same pen-name. Perhaps the one audience feeds into the other.

There is a common thread through both: belief in the supernatural. Don't get offended at that, it was not intended that way. So choose whatever other words you want to characterize it, but from my perspective it seems there is a possible crossover link.

Then I expect you will want to look at the number of fantasy writers that are/were believers. The author of the Narnia stories for example. There are a significant number of them that have been very successful in fantasy.

Some of them even sneak in their religion into the stories, although I have this only on second hand knowledge.

I wish you all the luck in making the best decision for you as a writer and as a person.

I can't be held responsible. I'm insane I tell you, insane!

Buy Scrivener for Windows or Mac