Author Topic: Vellum Pricing Structure.. Giving the Shaft to Longtime Users  (Read 3571 times)  

Offline writemore

  • Status: Lewis Carroll
  • **
  • Posts: 110
    • View Profile
Re: Vellum Pricing Structure.. Giving the Shaft to Longtime Users
« Reply #50 on: June 06, 2017, 05:48:42 AM »
But it's not Vellum 1, parts 1 and 2. The original is Vellum 1 and this is Vellum 2.0.

Then my Vellum 2 should cost the same as everyone else's Vellum 2.  :)

We'll just have to agree to disagree.  I can totally see where the OP is coming from.
« Last Edit: June 06, 2017, 05:50:22 AM by writemore »

Offline Steve Voelker

  • Status: Arthur Conan Doyle
  • ****
  • Posts: 592
  • Gender: Male
  • Philly
    • View Profile
Re: Vellum Pricing Structure.. Giving the Shaft to Longtime Users
« Reply #51 on: June 06, 2017, 06:31:59 AM »
Then my Vellum 2 should cost the same as everyone else's Vellum 2.  :)

We'll just have to agree to disagree.  I can totally see where the OP is coming from.

That's not what is being said.

And I think this is part of the misunderstanding that is causing the confusion. Vellum 2 is not Vellum print.

If you completely ignore the addition of Vellum print, the core, ebook only Vellum has been upgraded to Vellum 2.0, with a ton of new features since the original. Even if there was no print option, this is a NEW version of Vellum. Vellum 2.0.

Why would anyone expect to get a new product for free?

Yet somehow, they are letting all current users upgrade to Vellum 2.0 without charging. Which is AMAZING. Considering the amount of work that has gone into the new version, and the value that has been added, I am really surprised and impressed by this. I can't think of another piece of software that has added as many features as Vellum without charging for an upgrade.

You're right. Your Vellum 2 SHOULD cost the same as everyone else's Vellum 2. But it doesn't. It costs WAY less! Like $200 less.

But no one has a problem with that!

Instead here is the issue:

Some people are ruffled because they are claiming that new users can add the print option for $50, so why can't they?

But this is just not true.

New users can either buy Vellum 2.0 for $200, or the bundle for $250. Those are the only choices. In order to get Vellum print, they have to buy Vellum 2.0. None of the previous users have to do that. They are GIVING THAT TO YOU FOR FREE. FREE! A PIECE OF SOFTWARE THAT EVERYONE ELSE HAS TO PAY $200 FOR! WHY IN THE WORLD ARE PEOPLE COMPLAINING ABOUT THIS!!!!

Ahem.

The point is.

Instead of making you buy the whole thing for $250 to get access to the print option, (like they should have) they are letting you add it for only $100. And if you don't want print, then you are getting the upgrade to 2.0 for FREE.

That is a pretty sweet deal. And a great way to take care of loyal customers. So once again...

Thanks, guys!!
« Last Edit: June 06, 2017, 06:37:59 AM by Steve Voelker »

Online kenbritz

  • Status: Lewis Carroll
  • **
  • Posts: 205
  • Gender: Male
  • New York
    • View Profile
    • Ken Britz
Re: Vellum Pricing Structure.. Giving the Shaft to Longtime Users
« Reply #52 on: June 06, 2017, 08:49:54 AM »
Early adopters often end up paying more. Readers who want to read a print book will pay more for the hardback version. People who buy new release movies pay more than people who are willing to wait for the bargain bin or Netflix. This happens with lots of technology, too. It's nothing new.

In business parlance, early adopters are price insensitive. If you're griping about the update price, then you're not using the right term or do not meet the definition of an early adopter. I tend to believe the latter for the OP.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro

Ken Britz | Facebook | Website

Online kenbritz

  • Status: Lewis Carroll
  • **
  • Posts: 205
  • Gender: Male
  • New York
    • View Profile
    • Ken Britz
Re: Vellum Pricing Structure.. Giving the Shaft to Longtime Users
« Reply #53 on: June 06, 2017, 08:56:19 AM »
I think one thing that may be missed (and coders here are aware) is that much like your writing, software development isn't free. It requires a significant amount of work and a subscription model is an excellent way to fund continued development. The developers have likely modeled the price and cost structure in the decision they've made (they are developers, after all). Funding continued development is necessary to keep Vellum viable and relevant. Just as you want your favorite writer to keep writing....


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro

Ken Britz | Facebook | Website

Offline WDR

  • Status: Scheherazade
  • *****
  • Posts: 1286
  • Gender: Male
  • Massachusetts
  • To boldly split infinitives
    • View Profile
    • Official Website of William D. Richards
Re: Vellum Pricing Structure.. Giving the Shaft to Longtime Users
« Reply #54 on: June 09, 2017, 11:01:40 AM »
I'm also astonished about people needing hours to format their ebooks/books. It doesn't take me longer than twenty to thirty minutes, and that is mostly for flipping through once to find any problems. So I wonder how much of an assumed or luxury problem this is?

I built my first ebook by hand. Saved each chapter as a separate HTML file, then wrote out the EPUB manifest (the .opf file) and the content order file (the .ncx file) manually. Put them all together and then used the zip command on the command line to bind them together to generate the working EPUB file. It actually worked and was accepted by both iOS devices and the B&N Nook as a viable ebook.

Happily, major writing programs began adding the ability to save as an EPUB file. So, I never had to do the above ever again. (But it was an excellent exercise to learn how an EPUB is put together.) However, the writing programs (Apple's Pages is what I was using to do this) only generate the most generic EPUB file. Different ebook reading devices tend to render EPUBs differently. So getting a consistent look from one platform to another was a real pain.

When I generated my first book as an ebook for publication, I had to create four different copies and then tweak the CSS formatting in each one to homogenize the look and feel of the book across all platforms. This way it would render the same regardless of what device someone was using to read my book. This meant long hours across many nights of changing something and then side loading that file into the target ebook reader to test. Going for the Kindle added the step of needing to convert the EPUB to a MOBI file. The whole process to get usable ebook files ready for launch on all the major platforms took me nearly a month to do.

Vellum does the whole process in less than 30 seconds. AND the Kindle file is far better optimized than what I created! If your MOBI file isn't done correctly, Amazon hits you with a "delivery fee" for each download of your ebook; the fee is tiny, but in volume it adds up pretty quickly.

I will also add, the generated output Brad & Brad created is very clean and elegant. The OPF and NCX files inside the EPUB envelope are very well structured and easy to read. Many generated EPUBs from other programs dispense with the white space (spaces and carriage returns). The CSS is very easy to follow, so if you want to make a change, you should be able to do so with minimal surprises.

Our money is well-invested when purchasing Vellum. And that is just for the ability to generate an ebook easily. Now that it can also generate the PDF file needed for going to print-- Woo! Hoo!

I would strongly urge anyone to go to the Terminal program and unzip an EPUB file generated by Vellum to see what is inside. An ebook is nothing more than a self-contained website, with each webpage representing a chapter in your book.
Aggadeh Chronicles Book 3: Oracle: 11%
William D. Richards | Official Website | A Writer's Chronicles | Patreon