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With the odd disappearance of her parents, Gussie Gibson has lived her entire life with her granny on a peaceful pecan orchard, owned by the meanest man in all of Georgia—Mr. J.P. Combs. Granny teaches Gussie many valuable life lessons as a black woman growing up in the still-segregated south. Mr. Combs is an evil underhanded banker who takes liberties beyond his privilege. When Granny dies, Combs informs Gussie she owes him back rent—but he wants much more than money for payment—and more than Gussie can live with.
After defending herself against his sexual advances, Gussie flees to escape certain vigilante justice when she meets a charming, handsome stranger, Sam Johnson, who is just returning from World War II.
Gussie and Sam’s friendship is short-lived when Mr. Combs hunts her down and drags her back to Green Ridge, driven by his craving for revenge and a grudge too deep to comprehend. Gussie fights to return to Sam and his lo...

Author Topic: What makes a 100k author?  (Read 62281 times)  

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Re: What makes a 100k author?
« Reply #25 on: June 09, 2017, 03:26:43 AM »
Just got around to reading the actual article. It appears to have ruffled the feathers of quite a few editors.

Offline Jim Johnson

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Re: What makes a 100k author?
« Reply #26 on: June 09, 2017, 05:05:20 AM »
Just got around to reading the actual article. It appears to have ruffled the feathers of quite a few editors.

Seriously. I'm a professionally trained editor and some of those comments make me embarrassed for my colleagues. I thought this post was spot-on, though.

Quote
...It's not devaluing an author's work to say 250 is fine, it's being realistic to a proportional average return. There are people who are making 40k paying their bills with their writing, and 2k a book isn't realistic for them. Saying "well, they shouldn't publish then," is frankly horrible when there are even errors in books put out by the big five (or six if you count Harlequin which is synonymous with the romance genre).

The average reader's not going to catch nor care about run on sentences, comma splices, garden path sentences (most don't even know what this is), etc. That's not to say editors aren't necessary, but the price point is the difference between Moet and Stella Rosa. It might be nice to get Moet, but most people can't afford to drink itand Stella Rosa is 13 a bottle and the average person can't tell the difference.

Offline CABarrett

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Re: What makes a 100k author?
« Reply #27 on: June 09, 2017, 06:14:16 AM »
Seriously. I'm a professionally trained editor and some of those comments make me embarrassed for my colleagues.


Just out of curiosity, when one poster says they're a trained CMOS editor, is that just Chicago Manual of Style? Or some sort of governing body?

It seems clear that the survey design doesn't appear to distinguish between different types of editing services, and that's contributed to the angst in the comments. Like this comment, I would guess that the $250-$500 range represents authors buying less than the traditional multi-stage edit.

Offline Jim Johnson

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Re: What makes a 100k author?
« Reply #28 on: June 09, 2017, 06:26:01 AM »
Just out of curiosity, when one poster says they're a trained CMOS editor, is that just Chicago Manual of Style? Or some sort of governing body?

It's just the style guide. A lot of editors use it as their basis for work, but there's not a certificate or official organization to join. Anyone can grab a copy of CMOS and say they're a trained editor. Sorta like how anyone can hang a shingle and call themselves a literary agent. An editor could join ACES or EFA, but like most professional orgs, they're not really necessary.

Offline kathrynoh

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Re: What makes a 100k author?
« Reply #29 on: June 09, 2017, 08:55:26 AM »
Interesting that a lot of people in the comments don't seem to see the difference between making $100K gross or net. I'd assume that if you talk about $100K that would their net profit per year, but it isn't actually spelled out in the article. I am sure there are writings grossing over $100K a year but barely breaking even after paying for fb ads etc.

I found it interesting that a lot of successful authors handle marketing themselves. I'm in a couple of fb groups where it seems like everyone has a VA. A lot of the same people talk about how hard it is to break even on their writing. TBH, I think a lot of people just like to be able to say they have a VA :)

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Re: What makes a 100k author?
« Reply #30 on: June 09, 2017, 09:00:32 AM »
Good luck! It sounds like you have an excellent plan - you did your research, found an under-served but hungry genre, and are reverse-engineering the best-sellers. IIRC, Annie Bellet said that she reverse-engineered the hottest sellers in her genre, and was rewarded with a series that exploded out of the gate. Sounds like you have the fundamentals down to get into the 100K club.

Me, I was a member of the 100K club for two years. I can trace my success back to one thing - BookBub. Yeah. That's about the extent of it. I had two BookBub ads a year for two years in a row, and they blew.the.roof.off.the.house - all four of them. Then I became persona non-grata with them, and I stumbled completely.

Now, I'm trying to get back in with a much better, more sustainable path that doesn't rely on the caprices of one site. I really want to take control of my own destiny. I'll see if it works.

I would love to get a Bookbub but I feel the same and don't want to rely on just them. I never want all of my eggs in one basket (though I'd definitely be grateful for that basket).

It sounds like you've got a pretty solid plan, especially from your other threads. I've been rooting for you!

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Offline Crystal_

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Re: What makes a 100k author?
« Reply #31 on: June 09, 2017, 09:03:39 AM »
You're right and if I suggested that you need a hit book written to market to make $100k, I didn't mean to. You don't have to have a hit to make $100k. You can have two dozen low selling books. Or a medium hit and a dozen low sellers. Or three moderate hits. Etc.

For me, it was book 4. That doesn't mean every person who writes book 4 will make $100k. Nor do you need a hit. There are many paths to $100k but few will make the trip.

Simply writing 30 books will not guarantee you will make 100k. Paying for a pro edit and pro cover will not ensure you earn 100k. You can write 30 crappy books and make no money. You can spend a fortune on covers and editing and still flop. That old saying that you can put lipstick on a pig, but it's still a pig is true.

Storytelling matters.

Yes, I had a similar experience. My first three books were far off genre and they lingered in the red forever. My fourth book was the one to do well (technically, it was a serial). But it wasn't that it was my fourth book. It was that it was the first one I wrote to market. Some people are naturally in the head space of a genre and don't have to try to write to market. I had a very different idea about fiction than hitting genre tropes, mostly because of my screenwriting background (the mentality is opposite-- novelty and surprise are emphasized).  It took a lot of work for me to reconcile writing to market and writing what I want.

That book is not my best work, but I think it turned out pretty good. The cover was on-point but not necessarily beautiful. The editing left something to be desired (I did pay someone, but typos remained). But the serial floundered for a while, even with price promotions, until I got some opportunities to get it in front of a lot of people. Even if you write the most commercial book in the world, with the greatest cover and blurb imaginable, you still need visibility. If you're a new author, without a list, that's difficult, especially in crowded genres. At a certain point, you do have to believe in your book. And then you have to get the next one out there.

If you can write six books a year, you only need each book to make 20k in its lifetime to hit a five figure salary. I'm sure that sounds like a lot to new authors--it is a lot--but that's reasonable in big, commercial genres, especially if you have a series you can advertise in a multitude of ways.

I write slightly less commercial stuff now. I'm in a smaller niche I love, so I don't have to work too hard to think about making my books commercial. But romance has gotten more competitive, even in the last year, so I constantly need to do different stuff to advertise. (I'm biggest on FB ads and AMS, and slacking a bit on price-promotions lately). The main thing I'd take out of the article is that you never *get* to the big leagues. Even if you have a hit and make 300k (or more) one year. You still have to keep working to grow and build and get your books out there. The biggest authors are the ones who advertise the most. (Not applicable to everyone, but as a trend, the authors who make more tend to spend more on marketing and PR).

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Re: What makes a 100k author?
« Reply #32 on: June 09, 2017, 09:05:57 AM »
Interesting that a lot of people in the comments don't seem to see the difference between making $100K gross or net. I'd assume that if you talk about $100K that would their net profit per year, but it isn't actually spelled out in the article. I am sure there are writings grossing over $100K a year but barely breaking even after paying for fb ads etc.

I found it interesting that a lot of successful authors handle marketing themselves. I'm in a couple of fb groups where it seems like everyone has a VA. A lot of the same people talk about how hard it is to break even on their writing. TBH, I think a lot of people just like to be able to say they have a VA :)

My VA is HootSuite. 😂

It'd be nice to have an assistant eventually, but I can't justify the expense yet.

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Re: What makes a 100k author?
« Reply #33 on: June 09, 2017, 09:18:23 AM »
My VA is HootSuite. 😂

It'd be nice to have an assistant eventually, but I can't justify the expense yet.

It would be nice but as well as the expense, there's the whole thing of finding time to work what you want them to do and how you want them to do it :)

Offline C. Gockel

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Re: What makes a 100k author?
« Reply #34 on: June 09, 2017, 09:53:14 AM »
Quote
I found it interesting that a lot of successful authors handle marketing themselves. I'm in a couple of fb groups where it seems like everyone has a VA. A lot of the same people talk about how hard it is to break even on their writing. TBH, I think a lot of people just like to be able to say they have a VA :)

I actually make less than 100K and have hired a PA for some things. I have heard from a lot of 100Kers that their income growth has stalled even though they have more books out. I think it's because there is just so many hours in a day, and they have tons of books, but not the time to market them.

I have six series leads ins that I can advertise ... but I just can't get to ALL of them every month. By end of year I should have nine series lead-ins, plus a standalone that will be my responsibility to promote. I'm definitely not going to be able to manage them all. My plan is to to do all the higher level strategy, the AMS ads, and the FB, BookBub CPMs, plus the BookBub feature deal submissions, but I'll have her book the regular ads in the future based on a schedule I provide. This will cut down on ROI for those titles, but I think raise profits overall.

That's my plan anyway!

Lately, I've been using her to help manage acquisitions for box sets--tracking down authors for their stories, blurbs, and such. It has saved me hours of work, and the price is worth it.


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Offline Usedtoposthere

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Re: What makes a 100k author?
« Reply #35 on: June 09, 2017, 10:02:44 AM »
I think there are all kinds of ways to do this job.

I barely spent anything for the first couple years, and I don't spend tons now. I do agree that the biggest names in this genre do quite a lot of advertising and also put books out fast--much faster than I do. It's most important to me to write what I like and do the things that please me (which is writing books). I don't advertise much, but Amazon does some for me. I don't cross-promote, because I always forget to do my part or mess it up, I've found. I don't do boxed sets because like I said--no ideas. People say "write a short story for a reader magnet, or a novella for a boxed set," and I'm like--write what now? I have no idea if I could write a short story, let alone what it would be about.

And I'm having my best year ever although I haven't released since February, oddly enough. I've made mid-six figures the past three years, but this year, it looks like it'll be high-six. Doing it "my way" probably means I won't make seven figures, but I have pretty much most of the material things I could want, and I'm not young. At this point, I'll take "happy life" over "get to the top." Would it be nice to be an eight-figure author? Sure. But I want to keep writing what I like and doing what I like and taking chances.

So that's me. Everybody's different. Everybody has a different path to this point. Trad, trad then indie, indie then trad, releasing two books a month or one every six months, studying the market and tropes and writing strictly to that or writing from the heart and hitting the target almost accidentally. That's what strikes me. The diversity of 100K authors' experiences. As the article says--those authors spend a lot of time working, and they have pro covers and well-edited books. Beyond that, the paths diverge.

Thank you to others for sharing their paths.
« Last Edit: June 09, 2017, 10:41:17 AM by Rosalind J »

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Re: What makes a 100k author?
« Reply #36 on: June 09, 2017, 11:17:40 AM »
I enjoyed the article. The conversation on the link is different than this one, which is interesting. It's only been a few months since I started publishing (not writing tho) so the information in the article gave me hope. Thank you.

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Offline Usedtoposthere

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Re: What makes a 100k author?
« Reply #37 on: June 09, 2017, 11:37:27 AM »
I enjoyed the article. The conversation on the link is different than this one, which is interesting. It's only been a few months since I started publishing (not writing tho) so the information in the article gave me hope. Thank you.
The comments on the article are mostly focused on editing cost, which I'm sure does vary wildly depending on whether an author does all the steps (developmental, copyediting, proofreading) or just one or two of them. Developmental is the most expensive. My Montlake DE, for example, charges $2K for one round of developmental and line editing on an indie project. (That's a reduction from her rate for three rounds for Montlake.) I've only done that on one indie project, although I've learned a ton through working with her on five books.

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Re: What makes a 100k author?
« Reply #38 on: June 09, 2017, 01:12:14 PM »
I actually make less than 100K and have hired a PA for some things. I have heard from a lot of 100Kers that their income growth has stalled even though they have more books out. I think it's because there is just so many hours in a day, and they have tons of books, but not the time to market them.

I have six series leads ins that I can advertise ... but I just can't get to ALL of them every month. By end of year I should have nine series lead-ins, plus a standalone that will be my responsibility to promote. I'm definitely not going to be able to manage them all. My plan is to to do all the higher level strategy, the AMS ads, and the FB, BookBub CPMs, plus the BookBub feature deal submissions, but I'll have her book the regular ads in the future based on a schedule I provide. This will cut down on ROI for those titles, but I think raise profits overall.

That's my plan anyway!

Lately, I've been using her to help manage acquisitions for box sets--tracking down authors for their stories, blurbs, and such. It has saved me hours of work, and the price is worth it.

I can't wait until I can justify hiring a full-time or part-time marketing and PR person. I've never done well unless I advertised heavily (of course, well is relative. I could probably clear six figures without much advertising if I released 5-6 books/year, but I want to hit mid-six figures), but I do not enjoy doing CPC ads. Setting up a free run or KCD isn't too bad. It takes an hour or two, max. But CPC ads suck up time and mental energy like no one's business. I've tried working with contract ad people, but we always end up parting ways after a while.

I can't wait until I can manage to find an actual employee, who will be responsible for managing my ads, a Chief Marketing Officer, if you will. I'd rather spend more time writing.

I think there are all kinds of ways to do this job.

I barely spent anything for the first couple years, and I don't spend tons now. I do agree that the biggest names in this genre do quite a lot of advertising and also put books out fast--much faster than I do. It's most important to me to write what I like and do the things that please me (which is writing books). I don't advertise much, but Amazon does some for me. I don't cross-promote, because I always forget to do my part or mess it up, I've found. I don't do boxed sets because like I said--no ideas. People say "write a short story for a reader magnet, or a novella for a boxed set," and I'm like--write what now? I have no idea if I could write a short story, let alone what it would be about.

And I'm having my best year ever although I haven't released since February, oddly enough. I've made mid-six figures the past three years, but this year, it looks like it'll be high-six. Doing it "my way" probably means I won't make seven figures, but I have pretty much most of the material things I could want, and I'm not young. At this point, I'll take "happy life" over "get to the top." Would it be nice to be an eight-figure author? Sure. But I want to keep writing what I like and doing what I like and taking chances.

So that's me. Everybody's different. Everybody has a different path to this point. Trad, trad then indie, indie then trad, releasing two books a month or one every six months, studying the market and tropes and writing strictly to that or writing from the heart and hitting the target almost accidentally. That's what strikes me. The diversity of 100K authors' experiences. As the article says--those authors spend a lot of time working, and they have pro covers and well-edited books. Beyond that, the paths diverge.

Thank you to others for sharing their paths.


In my experience, getting Amazon promotions makes a huge difference. If only I could have a Kindle Monthly Deal every month. *Sigh*

Most of the marketing we do is aimed at kicking in Amazon's visibility algos. If selling more books didn't get you more visibility, most CPC marketing would be deep in the red. It's hard to make a profit with CPC ads when you're selling one book that nets you $2-4. It gets easier if you have a series, but you still need Amazon boosting your visibility to see serious profits.
« Last Edit: June 09, 2017, 01:17:09 PM by Crystal_ »

Offline PamelaKelley

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Re: What makes a 100k author?
« Reply #39 on: June 09, 2017, 01:23:22 PM »
The comments on the article are mostly focused on editing cost, which I'm sure does vary wildly depending on whether an author does all the steps (developmental, copyediting, proofreading) or just one or two of them. Developmental is the most expensive. My Montlake DE, for example, charges $2K for one round of developmental and line editing on an indie project. (That's a reduction from her rate for three rounds for Montlake.) I've only done that on one indie project, although I've learned a ton through working with her on five books.

How are you defining developmental? Is it more of a very substantive edit? When I've had developmental they were much less expensive but I think we may be talking about different things. What I had done is also called a content edit--basically the editor reads the book then sends notes on how to make it better, areas that are confusing, need expanding, more conflict, etc. Usually a letter of a few pages. 

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Re: What makes a 100k author?
« Reply #40 on: June 09, 2017, 01:27:52 PM »
How are you defining developmental? Is it more of a very substantive edit? When I've had developmental they were much less expensive but I think we may be talking about different things. What I had done is also called a content edit--basically the editor reads the book then sends notes on how to make it better, areas that are confusing, need expanding, more conflict, etc. Usually a letter of a few pages. 
The developmental editing I've had is a letter plus line editing. The editor actually takes only 3-7 days to get it back to me (and that's on a 110K book), but there is line editing.

She is pricey, but she was an acquisitions editor for one of the big romance lines and is well known. As I said, she's helped me become a better writer, so my Montlake experience was definitely helpful in that way.

Offline katrina46

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Re: What makes a 100k author?
« Reply #41 on: June 09, 2017, 02:33:34 PM »
Seriously. I'm a professionally trained editor and some of those comments make me embarrassed for my colleagues. I thought this post was spot-on, though.
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Re: What makes a 100k author?
« Reply #42 on: June 09, 2017, 02:47:12 PM »
Wow. There are some VERY perturbed editors on there.

I feel for them; I really do. It's the end of an era.

A couple of key things have changed around editing since I first started writing back in the '80s. For most of the years since an author's entire career might span as many as 6-10 books. But that was a LOT!! Ten books - my god, you'd done a book a year for a DECADE! You were doing really well to accomplish that. Most writers never got past 3-5. A scant few hit 12+.

Well, many decades ago, a famous editor talked about the first *MILLION* words of a writer's career being their apprenticeship. Those first million words were the beginner crap. They were rife with errors in storytelling and needed a lot of editing work to improve them. Masterwork writing was something expected of people with more than a couple million words of storytelling completed.

What changed was the pace. Once upon a time, it took a dozen years at one 80k word novel a year to break that million words. In other words, under the old system *virtually no author ever left that apprentice stage*.

Enter Kindle and the indie writing revolution. Today, many people hit that million words in just a couple of years. Writing 4-6 books a year is common now. Writing 12 in a year isn't weird. Writing 36 in a year isn't unheard of anymore. The world has changed. Most of those $100k+ writers being spoken of in the article have a LOT of books out. The mean is 33. At that stage, the typical writer doesn't need a dev edit anymore. (She might want one; that's an entirely different story. Every writer makes their own calls on this stuff.) At that point, there are very few developmental/content editors capable of editing a work better than the author already wrote it. It's like handing a John Williams score to a typical composer and asking for improvements.

The $250-500 is what people are paying for typo correction, which is usually all an author needs at that stage of the game (33 books out). Frankly, I think even that is going to fade. The tools for spotting typos continue to improve year by year. They're not perfect, but I suspect within five years tools like Grammarly will match the average human copy editor for effectiveness. At which point that $250-500 is going to go down to "I pay my VA $25 to run the book through a grammar/typo tool".

I say all this having *been* a pro editor once. It's really the end of an era. Circumstances have made it so that people can publish without comprehensive edits even as a novice; the ones who continue to practice eventually improve to the point where they no longer need comprehensive edits anyway. Circumstances are changing so that soon even copy edits and proofreading will be something done by computers, not humans.

The editors posting in that thread are scared. They have every right to be. I feel for them. They are feeling now the way I probably will when some fine day 10 or so years from now a book hits the NYT bestseller list that was entirely written by a computer.

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Re: What makes a 100k author?
« Reply #43 on: June 09, 2017, 02:56:57 PM »
Wow. There are some VERY perturbed editors on there.

I feel for them; I really do. It's the end of an era.

A couple of key things have changed around editing since I first started writing back in the '80s. For most of the years since an author's entire career might span as many as 6-10 books. But that was a LOT!! Ten books - my god, you'd done a book a year for a DECADE! You were doing really well to accomplish that. Most writers never got past 3-5. A scant few hit 12+.

Well, many decades ago, a famous editor talked about the first *MILLION* words of a writer's career being their apprenticeship. Those first million words were the beginner crap. They were rife with errors in storytelling and needed a lot of editing work to improve them. Masterwork writing was something expected of people with more than a couple million words of storytelling completed.

What changed was the pace. Once upon a time, it took a dozen years at one 80k word novel a year to break that million words. In other words, under the old system *virtually no author ever left that apprentice stage*.

Enter Kindle and the indie writing revolution. Today, many people hit that million words in just a couple of years. Writing 4-6 books a year is common now. Writing 12 in a year isn't weird. Writing 36 in a year isn't unheard of anymore. The world has changed. Most of those $100k+ writers being spoken of in the article have a LOT of books out. The mean is 33. At that stage, the typical writer doesn't need a dev edit anymore. (She might want one; that's an entirely different story. Every writer makes their own calls on this stuff.) At that point, there are very few developmental/content editors capable of editing a work better than the author already wrote it. It's like handing a John Williams score to a typical composer and asking for improvements.

The $250-500 is what people are paying for typo correction, which is usually all an author needs at that stage of the game (33 books out). Frankly, I think even that is going to fade. The tools for spotting typos continue to improve year by year. They're not perfect, but I suspect within five years tools like Grammarly will match the average human copy editor for effectiveness. At which point that $250-500 is going to go down to "I pay my VA $25 to run the book through a grammar/typo tool".

I say all this having *been* a pro editor once. It's really the end of an era. Circumstances have made it so that people can publish without comprehensive edits even as a novice; the ones who continue to practice eventually improve to the point where they no longer need comprehensive edits anyway. Circumstances are changing so that soon even copy edits and proofreading will be something done by computers, not humans.

The editors posting in that thread are scared. They have every right to be. I feel for them. They are feeling now the way I probably will when some fine day 10 or so years from now a book hits the NYT bestseller list that was entirely written by a computer.

Yup.


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Offline C. Gockel

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Re: What makes a 100k author?
« Reply #44 on: June 09, 2017, 03:53:49 PM »
Quote
I can't wait until I can justify hiring a full-time or part-time marketing and PR person.

She is a superfan. The most I have ever hired her for is 4 hours a week (at this point.)

They were hours I *really* was grateful for--she herded authors for a recent anthology and also submitted to a lot of free sites.
« Last Edit: June 09, 2017, 06:46:12 PM by C. Gockel »


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Re: What makes a 100k author?
« Reply #45 on: June 09, 2017, 04:18:05 PM »
So it's important to remember when looking at averages that they are a fiction. They give you and overall idea of things. There is no guarantee that writing 30 books will earn you 100K. I know of authors with 15 and 20 books that do not sell. I know of authors with one book that earn six figures and more.

That was the strangest part of that survey. Most of the $100K+ authors on Kboards don't claim to have anywhere near 30 books. It is more like 7 or 10 or 15 books. And many of them talk about earning Mid to High six figures, not just a dollar or two over 100K. I wonder if they are counting short stories, novellas and such for that 30 books figure.

Offline Usedtoposthere

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Re: What makes a 100k author?
« Reply #46 on: June 09, 2017, 04:23:44 PM »
A LOT of romance authors who make day-job money have 50, 80, 100 books out there. A lot of them have also written for tradpub--are hybrid or switched from trad to indie. I'm relatively unprolific with my 23 books in 5-1/2 years of writing. Four books a year is slow in Romancelandia. I write long for the genre, but still.

Offline Chris Fox

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Re: What makes a 100k author?
« Reply #47 on: June 09, 2017, 07:32:34 PM »
In general, I agree with those findings but there will always be those whose journey to six figures is very different. I haven't stopped working in over three years. A week here and there but it's a profession that requires constant attention. If I'm not writing, I'm marketing or formatting or answering emails. I didn't technically have a day job when I started but I do have a family and two kids under 7 so my writing time is compressed into a few hours a day. Only a rare few can publish one or two books and hit the big time.

This sums up my situation. When I said six-figure authors worked harder, I wasn't trying to be flippant. I'm just shocked that it's so much more work than when I wrote part time with a day job. Marketing, taxes, insurance, writer's conferences, writing, editing, covers, and about two billion other things crop up daily. If I take time off, it feels like I fall behind immediately.

Part of that is that I'm still refining my systems, and hopefully over time it will get easier. For now, I work 60+ hours a week, and rarely take a day off. I make a good living, but the instant I take my foot off the gas I feel the drop in income.

Like Rosalind (and I think a couple others) said, everyone's path is a little different. The hardest stage for me was the last year at my day job. It was maddening trying to run a book business, while also working a challenging job. I know many people here are still in that phase. I have serious respect for you.

It is easier once you go full time, but I thought it would be a LOT easier. It isn't.

Offline KevinMcLaughlin

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Re: What makes a 100k author?
« Reply #48 on: June 09, 2017, 07:47:24 PM »
Boy, I totally hear that, Chris. I took time off for wedding prep, getting married, and a honeymoon, and then even MORE time where I was writing slower than usual because I was winding down my day job. As a result my May income took a serious hit (like 40% lower than April). I launched a new book today, and will launch more soon, but I've got to push HARD for the next little while to get caught back up from a month and a half of reduced effort.

And I didn't even take that time *off*. I just wasn't pushing as hard as I could have been. I eased off the gas and saw pretty rapid results. And not in a good way. ;)

This isn't a 'cry for me' post. ;) I'm working hard again and will be back up in no time, but it's good evidence that even if you're making solid income from writing now, that won't necessarily last long if you stop paying attention for a little while.

Offline Jim Johnson

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Re: What makes a 100k author?
« Reply #49 on: June 09, 2017, 07:47:54 PM »
Like Rosalind (and I think a couple others) said, everyone's path is a little different. The hardest stage for me was the last year at my day job. It was maddening trying to run a book business, while also working a challenging job. I know many people here are still in that phase. I have serious respect for you.

Don't add a baby to the mix any time soon. :D Talk about challenging on top of a day job and full-time writing and every other thing.

Thanks for being an inspiration, Chris!