Author Topic: seeking great worldbuilding, share your books  (Read 2104 times)  

Offline Amras

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Re: seeking great worldbuilding, share your books
« Reply #25 on: June 14, 2017, 12:30:54 PM »
World building was one of my favorite part of planning the books I write.
My book is not ready yet. But for the fantasy world I have it set up in three different region.
The main land I named Lazzeric, where the magic users reside, mostly all humans.
A smaller island to the side is known as the Technology island, where there is no magic, but everyone there is highly advanced with technology stuff.
Then another island north where it became a fusion of the two, where all the non-human beings, that are rejected from the other two areas stay.

The people end up crossing over to each others lands, and it causes a lot of problems. It ends up being a magic vs. technology type situation.

I feel world building is one of the areas you get to be the most creative. Building the entire kingdom, and the people, the history, all of the back stories and lores involved. It's fun having full control.

Online Kay7979

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Re: seeking great worldbuilding, share your books
« Reply #26 on: June 14, 2017, 12:44:00 PM »
So, your saying the inside of trees connect to both dimensions?
Reminds me of some urban fantasy I've read. Where a magical world exists right under our noses. I can get into that when it is quirky and subtle and when the world is hidden. Basically when the book is about discovery I like it. Once the whole iceberg is out in the open, I tend to lose interest.
I never want to know all of the secrets.

Actually, the trees do not link the two worlds. The gnomes are able to access interdimensional space in any tree, whether here or in their own world. They can also travel from tree to tree within that interdimensional realm. Think of it as the woodland equivalent of the "floo network" in Harry Potter, where characters pass from fireplace to fireplace. (I didn't steal the idea. The first draft of Beyond the Forest was written in the 1980s.) 

The portal is the access between the worlds. On our side, it's located in a confined area called the Amulet, which is a region whose function is to keep "intruders" from freely accessing our world. In book one, the gnomes' gem master queen, a being of a different race, hopes to expand her reign into our world by destroying the Amulet's ability to keep her out. My MC, Lana, gets involved with the gnomes not only to liberate them, but to prevent the conquest of our world.         

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Offline KhaosFoxe

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Re: seeking great worldbuilding, share your books
« Reply #27 on: June 14, 2017, 12:53:21 PM »
My Ink Born series came about because I wanted to write a full fantasy kitchen sink world.  :D My focus has been on the magic, there are twenty main types of magic used within the world. The protagonist is a tattoo magician and I really enjoyed exploring his relationship with his magic through the books thus far.

The world as a whole is a mix modern day with full magic and lots of magical beings. People come into their magic during puberty and will go to college to train and be graded in whatever their magic form is. There are micro-cultures within the main cultures where shifters view the world one way, wood elves view it another, and so on and so forth. That leads to all sorts of interesting layers and nuances to explore. I absolutely adore playing in this world, I have plans for four or more more series set there.

Stolen Ink's in my signature.  :)

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Re: seeking great worldbuilding, share your books
« Reply #28 on: June 14, 2017, 01:18:20 PM »
If you want to look at great world building, check out Brandon Sanderson. He comes up unique magic systems in each of his series as well as unique cultures. But the most striking thing is what he did with the biology in his Stormlight Archive series. Since that world is pummeled by strong winds that always come from one direction, everything in nature has adapted. Grass grows out from tubes, like sea anemone. Even trees snap closed their vital bits when disturbed. Societies built walls to block the wind on that side which becomes a huge issue when Bad Thing happens and the wind changes.


Offline JaclynDolamore

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Re: seeking great worldbuilding, share your books
« Reply #29 on: June 14, 2017, 02:17:30 PM »
I love that this turned into a whole discussion. I'm enjoying this thread!

Love what you said about each place having it's own mood. That's as important to the world building as anything else, sort of an unwritten rule. Kind of unrelated note, but I like unwritten rules for characters. I've got one race of people who always have a knife. No matter how bad things get, or what kind of trouble they're in, they always have a knife within reach, even when other character think they've taken the knife away from them. It's not a superpower, it's not explicitly stated, they're just crafty.

I like cultural rules, unwritten and written. And one thing I like playing with is uncomfortable differences in morals. It fascinates me how as humans, we will decide that something is the Absolute Right Moral Way to Do Things, while another culture will do things opposite. Or we'll change our mind over time. Like whether it's good or bad to let kids play with knives or roam a neighborhood alone, or what the age of consent is. That can be a hard line to walk because I don't want readers to think I necessarily am endorsing a radical view, but it's interesting to play with.

Paralel worlds scare me. As soon as I connect to book to the real world, it has to be factually accurate. I guess the benefit is, it is you get the benefit of a character from our world to ask questions and explain things.

I actually don't have that benefit, at least not for a while! The culture is being imported, secretly at first. In The Sorcerer's Concubine, the sorcerers who discovered the portal have just been passing it off like they've been developing all this technology and culture themselves. At first some readers thought the book actually took place in our world in the far flung future... I guess that's what makes my portal story different from most, although I never thought of it until now, is that I am viewing the world almost entirely from the inside. Almost no human characters. Just another world trying to take in all of our culture getting grabbed up by them, or dumped on them, depending on perspective. I'm sure my teenage obsession with anime ended up influencing this a lot. I was so into Japan, and Japan wouldn't be Japan without the heavy influence of the west, and yet at the same time, Japan is 100% itself in everything it does, even if it's making French pastry or locomotives or adapting western children's books into animation.

It also gives me a lot of fodder for humor...

Not only cohesion, but sometimes words from our world have roots in specific places or things that totally ruin the fantasy.
I can't think of any good examples right now, but there are plenty. John Hancock(meaning signature), red herring, saying that someone had a spartan attitude, when ancient greece didn't exist in this world. Things like that.

Mm, yeah, I still have problems with that. Modern expressions, for example. My characters are very modern people so I don't go too nuts trying to avoid our idioms and such. If you don't use some, language often sounds old-fashioned which I don't want. It would be strange for people to speak without any of them at all. And it would be silly to try to make up hundreds of your own idioms. I try not to use ones that really take you out of it, though.

Ugh I was going to reply to some other stuff too but I have GOT TO GET TO WORK NOW...

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Offline blerg et al.

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Re: seeking great worldbuilding, share your books
« Reply #30 on: June 14, 2017, 08:36:23 PM »

Regarding the covers, the books are high fantasy, where illustrated covers (or photomanip covers heavily overpainted to look illustrated) seem to be dominant. Long tradition there. More obviously photo-based covers would put me more in mind of urban fantasy.

ETA: Oh, and I'm glad you like the covers! I'm kind of in love with them  :D
I wouldn't mind having covers like these when I can afford them. I hesitate to put faces to my characters, but that never stopped me from enjoying books in the past.

How do you like the faces that the artist gave your characters? Was it in line with how you see them?


My books are science fiction, but I feel I write to a fantasy audience. I have to keep it in the sci-fi lists, but but I'd love a cover that screams high fantasy.
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Offline blerg et al.

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Re: seeking great worldbuilding, share your books
« Reply #31 on: June 14, 2017, 08:44:36 PM »
I love that this turned into a whole discussion. I'm enjoying this thread!
Me too.  :D I started it cause I was home sick.
Now I missed my writers lunch and I'm putting off editing to read these great responses.
Will catch up with this thread tomorrow. I might have to make a spreadsheet for my new re-read shelf. I knew there were some cool worlds out there.
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Offline blerg et al.

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Re: seeking great worldbuilding, share your books
« Reply #32 on: June 14, 2017, 08:55:40 PM »
If you want to look at great world building, check out Brandon Sanderson.
Yes  ;D He's actually the one I quoted earlier, when I said " err on the side of awesome." I have only read the first two mistborn books. But I've watched all of his lectures, on YouTube, and I'm working my way through his Writing Excuses podcast backlist.
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Offline Kyra Halland

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Re: seeking great worldbuilding, share your books
« Reply #33 on: June 14, 2017, 08:59:29 PM »
I wouldn't mind having covers like these when I can afford them. I hesitate to put faces to my characters, but that never stopped me from enjoying books in the past.

How do you like the faces that the artist gave your characters? Was it in line with how you see them?


My books are science fiction, but I feel I write to a fantasy audience. I have to keep it in the sci-fi lists, but but I'd love a cover that screams high fantasy.

My artist is surprisingly affordable, but he's pretty busy and sometimes hard to get hold of. He's done the covers on all the books in my signature. He really has a talent for bringing my characters to life; I'm really happy with how he depicts my characters. There's one cover where I asked him to make some changes to one of the characters; I really wasn't sure how to describe the character's appearance so he did the best he could on what little I gave him, then soon after I launched the cover (it was a new cover for a pre-existing book) I came across a stock photo of a model who's the exact image in my mind of the character. So I sent it to my artist and asked if he could make a few changes (of course I would pay for the additional work) and he said he thought he could get to it in a month or two, but he hasn't yet.

But yeah, it's really fun to see how he brings my characters to life.


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Offline CynthiaClay

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Re: seeking great worldbuilding, share your books
« Reply #34 on: June 14, 2017, 09:23:00 PM »
My novel Zollocco has a world that is a character. I was interested in the notion of the "hive mind" that bees are said to have. What would it be like if an entire forest had a hive mind; what if the whole world were a forest that had an hive mind that encompassed the hive minds of the different forests on it? Then I plunked my heroine into. She ran off to other planets because the interplanetary corporation that stole her from earth in the first place was about to capture  her. In the other worlds, I got interested in what sort of architecture would these different types of places have. How was the architecture suited to the environment?

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Offline Jeff Tanyard

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Re: seeking great worldbuilding, share your books
« Reply #35 on: June 14, 2017, 09:52:06 PM »
If you want to look at great world building, check out Brandon Sanderson. He comes up unique magic systems in each of his series as well as unique cultures.

I love his magic system for Mistborn.  It might be the most elegant system I've seen in fantasy.
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Online brkingsolver

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Re: seeking great worldbuilding, share your books
« Reply #36 on: June 15, 2017, 06:25:49 AM »
I didn't have to build a world for my Telepathic Clans books. I simply reveal millennia-old secrets. Of course, I'm now in a sort of witness-protection program because the Clans aren't too happy with me. Be careful. The family next door may be reading your mind.
 

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Offline blerg et al.

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Re: seeking great worldbuilding, share your books
« Reply #37 on: June 15, 2017, 08:53:49 AM »
So I sent it to my artist and asked if he could make a few changes (of course I would pay for the additional work) and he said he thought he could get to it in a month or two, but he hasn't yet.
It's tough to pin an artist down. I make money off of my art, more than I make from  my writing. But I am terrible at commissioned work. If I' not feeling it, it's impossible to get any work out of me.

Just another world trying to take in all of our culture getting grabbed up by them, or dumped on them, depending on perspective. I'm sure my teenage obsession with anime ended up influencing this a lot. I was so into Japan, and Japan wouldn't be Japan without the heavy influence of the west, and yet at the same time, Japan is 100% itself in everything it does, even if it's making French pastry or locomotives or adapting western children's books into animation.

I try not to borrow too much from other cultures. Some level of appropriation is going to happen, regardless, but I tiptoe around subjects I'm not especially knowledgeble on. In today's world, to do it well, you have to know your subject. Melleville could whip up a bunch of vaguely eastern mystics, and cannibal islanders, to give an exotic flavor to his stories, but in a modern world, you can't just misrepresent an entire culture without it coming off as false. I still borrow, but I do it very carefully.

Japan, I am less worried about. They're a major cultural powerhouse and media exporter. And like you said, hugely influenced by western culture at the same time. Not to mention the long history of cyberpunk writers setting their stories in some sort of future tokyo. I make sure to remind my readers that this entire world was thrown into darkness ages ago. Allows for a little more leeway.

I can't say how great it is, but this is my methodology: super slow, and I try as much as possible to let the world emerge through character interaction, experientially, explaining as little as I can get away with. Most of us have no clue how our world really works, we just know how things appear on the surface, actions and consequences. My characters accept the world around them, sometimes they discuss it, make guesses, but they don't really know what's going on: they're not heroes, not generals or warriors, no chosen ones here, just a bunch of kids trying real hard not to die. I try to build character, and then let the reader go with them, so they discover things and try to solve the mysteries together. I'm about to publish Book 4, but the world won't be fully explained (as such) until the end of Book 6.

Letting the characters explain it is a great tool. And it's definitely good to draw it out. I think I made the mistake of sharing too little in book one though.
At first I didn't explain the world well enough. Later revisions I added better descriptions and even a sketch in the beginning. Soon I'll be replacing this with a map.

Still haven't fixed my biggest problem. There's a big conspiratorial scheme, and a lost love motivating one characters' actions and hardly any of that is explained until book two. I get good enough reviews, but a lot of people don't know why the characters are doing what they do. It's a little too subtle. Sometimes I wish I had laid everything out from the beginning. Not the whole world, but enough to keep people from feeling disoriented.
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Offline Lee Sutherland

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Re: seeking great worldbuilding, share your books
« Reply #38 on: June 15, 2017, 10:01:58 AM »
My newest novel, Land of the Dogs, has a great deal of socio-political worldbuilding in a post-apocalyptic world.  I considered how the few people who survived the apocalypse would group together and the kinds of societies they would form based on the leaders who rose to power.  It's very microcosmic and takes place in a small region in the southern US. 

The three main settlements are Town Hall, where residents formed a barricade around the city hall building.  It's the first camp my protag goes to and is very much like the US political system--one man who is the leader and delegates things to others.  The second settlement is Old Man River's Farm.  They are religious fanatics who believe they survived so that they can take back the world for God.  And then there is the High School, where an old military man with a violent approach rules on fear and power. 

As my protag goes from camp to camp, searching for his family, he has to decide which society is best and which he will support when his journey is over.

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Re: seeking great worldbuilding, share your books
« Reply #39 on: June 15, 2017, 02:04:19 PM »
Yes  ;D He's actually the one I quoted earlier, when I said " err on the side of awesome." I have only read the first two mistborn books. But I've watched all of his lectures, on YouTube, and I'm working my way through his Writing Excuses podcast backlist.

Awesome indeed! I would recommend any books he's written. I also love his podcasts and youtube lectures. They really go into great detail on how to world build, create characters, develop story arcs, and even delve into publishing stuff. I actually began watching those when I was trying to help a friend write his book, Fool's Journey. I wound up on a journey myself that led to my own writing which will hopefully turn into a finished book this fall.

Online AlecHutson

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Re: seeking great worldbuilding, share your books
« Reply #40 on: June 15, 2017, 02:47:38 PM »
Lots of great replies in this thread, and I love to see everyone's passion for genre fiction!

For my own epic fantasy, my world is fairly standard by the genre's standards. Various kingdoms and empires that resemble imperial Rome, Europe during the middle ages, and Tang dynasty China. And while nothing terribly original, a lot of readers have remarked that they enjoy the world. I think that's because I spent some time really refining the history and cultures - I suppose my point is that while radically imaginative world-building is terrific, you can still satisfy readers in your genre if you take the old favorites and try your best to do them well.

Some authors whose fantasy world-building skills I'm in awe of:

Well, George RR Martin, obviously. Another standard fantasy world, but drawn so well and with such attention to detail that entire books have been written exploring its history.

China Mieville. His New Crobuzon books are some of the most amazing world-building I've ever seen. I don't think I've encountered a writer with a more fecund imagination. The island of the mosquito people. Color bombs. Slake moths. Cactus-men. The possibility sword.

R. Scott Bakker. Outside of being an exceptional sentence-level writer, Bakker has created a world that out-Tolkiens Tolkien. No conlangs, but you can feel the world groaning under the weight of its history and age and mysteries as you read his series.

I love writers who can transport me to amazing new worlds. My three favorite fantasy books are Game of Thrones (Martin), The Scar (Mieville) and The Darkness That Comes Before (Bakker)   

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Offline MLKatz

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Re: seeking great worldbuilding, share your books
« Reply #41 on: June 16, 2017, 10:38:58 AM »
I have a recent story about worldbuilding that is humorous and topical (to me, at least). My adult son was doing me the favor of editing and proofing a book I had previously released but added more content to. I had given one of my protagonists the nickname of "Jaguar" in the book.

Given the setting, my son got 23 pages in and insisted that I change jaguar to puma. That was based on geographical descriptions. Anyway, I thought he was right and wasn't sure how I'm missed it. Puma it is. http://mlkatz.com/rise-of-the-gatebreakers-video/
 
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Offline jckang

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Re: seeking great worldbuilding, share your books
« Reply #42 on: June 16, 2017, 02:34:41 PM »
I love awesome world building, as well, as long as it fits organically into the story and doesn't feel like an author intrusion or infodump.  As a teenager, just having finished Return of the King and gobbling up its appendices of family trees and historical dates (and then reading the Silmarillion and Forgotten Tales), I felt world building was events.  After all, that is how we learn history in grade school-- a series of events, and maybe some basic explanations of how it all came to pass.  When I started world building for a Dungeons and Dragons campaign, it followed that series of events.

Then, college made me look at history and politics differently, made me look at the trends in history and the underlying drivers.  I broadened my reading and academic horizons past the West. I learned about the concept of national and ethnic identities and "mythology" (I use quotes, because to me, mythology is not just about Zeus, Odin, or Amaterasu; but how a people views themselves, and the legends that spring up around historical events). One of my first jobs was working as a an analyst in a stock brokerage, and learned about economies.

So, fast forward 20 years, I was cleaning stuff out of my Mom's house, and came across my Dungeons and Dragons world. On a whim, I recreated it with some of the basic premises in tact; but making it a diverse world with multiple Earth cultures and traditional fantasy races.  I took into account the role of resources, economies, culture, religion, and considered how those elements in one nation would influence its neighbors. I also thought about how ethnic groups interpret events (For example, a cataclysmic event has a dozen different explanations based on who you talk to in the world).

In some cases, I worked backwards-- For example, I wanted to make one nation a dominant naval power; so I decided what in their history set them on that path, and gave them access to timber that was good for making ships.  In other cases, I worked forward: there's a race of physically strong, but short-lived humans, all male, because they have genetic mutations which makes them only produce Y-chromosome sperm, and also a sudden, early death. Their mythos posits that their progenitor was the mortal son of the Sun God, but was tricked by another God to a short life with only male heirs.  Said progenitor left a "last will" in an archaic language, which only a select few can read and interpret, which ultimately gives them a lot of control in this culture.

Overall, I want things in my world to be logical, and as I write, I need to maintain consistency.



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Offline jckang

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Re: seeking great worldbuilding, share your books
« Reply #43 on: June 16, 2017, 02:42:00 PM »
Well, George RR Martin, obviously. Another standard fantasy world, but drawn so well and with such attention to detail that entire books have been written exploring its history.

I've only read one and a half of his books, but I've been following it on HBO; and really, Martin blows me away with both his big picture and little details.  Stuff like religious practices, or the slogans of the ruling houses; and how everything connects.  To me, Tolkien is the master of the macro; but Martin has him beat with the micro.


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Offline blerg et al.

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Re: seeking great worldbuilding, share your books
« Reply #44 on: June 16, 2017, 10:04:45 PM »
China Mieville. His New Crobuzon books are some of the most amazing world-building I've ever seen. I don't think I've encountered a writer with a more fecund imagination. The island of the mosquito people. Color bombs. Slake moths. Cactus-men. The possibility sword.

That one sounds especially interesting.

I love your covers by the way. I've seen crimson queen on here before and loved all the detail. Twilight's end works better in thumbnail but it has a little of that cool city detail in the background too.  I was saying earlier, I like covers that imply that there is a lot going on in the world.

In some cases, I worked backwards-- For example, I wanted to make one nation a dominant naval power; so I decided what in their history set them on that path, and gave them access to timber that was good for making ships.  In other cases, I worked forward: there's a race of physically strong, but short-lived humans, all male, because they have genetic mutations which makes them only produce Y-chromosome sperm, and also a sudden, early death. Their mythos posits that their progenitor was the mortal son of the Sun God, but was tricked by another God to a short life with only male heirs.  Said progenitor left a "last will" in an archaic language, which only a select few can read and interpret, which ultimately gives them a lot of control in this culture.

I'm setting up a similar scenario. I want a dominant colonial power, based on a large Island, so England is a good model. I look at some of the factors that led to England being a dominant naval power and use this is my map-making. (I'm really more ignorant on the subject than I realized, so I'm picking up some history books.)

Also, I'm curious. Your species of all male strongmen, makes sense in theory. I'm assuming that they only have sons, so women marry into the society from other human populations. But I'm curious about, do you explain this biology to your readers?  It sounds like these societies aren't advanced enough to know about genetics so I assume the characters aren't talking about chromosomes. Or is it in a modern setting? (This is a tricky subject for me. Side project. I've been drafting a genetic engineering inspired fantasy for a few years now, but I haven't written it, because when the characters start to explain the science behind their powers it ruins some of the illusion of magic. It worked in Dune, so I know it can be done, I'm just being cautious.)
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Offline JTriptych

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Re: seeking great worldbuilding, share your books
« Reply #45 on: June 17, 2017, 07:14:32 AM »
My Dying World series is basically Star Wars, but with no spaceships.  ;D

Takes place millions (or maybe billions) of years in the future. The Oceans have dried up. No more trees and plants. Metal is very rare and highly sought after. Humanity survives in a precarious existence. Some people have evolved- a select few have mental powers called Vis. Males with this power are telekinetic and are called Magi. Women with this power are called Strigas and are telepathic.

I put a lot of emphasis on ecology- algae and underground fungi are primary food sources supplemented by hunting wild and dangerous beasts. Most tools are leather, stone, and bone. Iron based metals are subjected to the rusting sickness.

I also put in a bit of culture and stuff. The Magi and Strigas are constrained by very rigid traditions (Magi are emasculated, while Strigas are not allowed to marry and bear children). Belief in multiple gods are widespread, along with traditional concepts of survival and hospitality.

That's the short of it. Currently working on book 3 of the series.  ;)

Offline jckang

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Re: seeking great worldbuilding, share your books
« Reply #46 on: June 17, 2017, 09:16:39 AM »
Also, I'm curious. Your species of all male strongmen, makes sense in theory. I'm assuming that they only have sons, so women marry into the society from other human populations. But I'm curious about, do you explain this biology to your readers?  It sounds like these societies aren't advanced enough to know about genetics so I assume the characters aren't talking about chromosomes. Or is it in a modern setting? (This is a tricky subject for me. Side project. I've been drafting a genetic engineering inspired fantasy for a few years now, but I haven't written it, because when the characters start to explain the science behind their powers it ruins some of the illusion of magic. It worked in Dune, so I know it can be done, I'm just being cautious.)

The genetics of the all-male race are explained as a curse, since it is being told from a fantasy perspective.  In other parts of the world, the ability to use magic is a genetic trait carried on the X-chromosome, making females more likely to have the talent-- but once again, since the science and technology level is about  the equivalent of 1600 AD, they don't know why.

As for why a nation would become a naval power-- I bet there are tons of original ways to explain it (though in the real world, it has traditionally boiled down to money).


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Offline CaptnAndy

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Re: seeking great worldbuilding, share your books
« Reply #47 on: June 17, 2017, 04:46:22 PM »
My books are of the Adult, Hard Science Fiction variety, but several are set in post-extermination event worlds, including the Coastal Event Memories Five Volume Series, where small bands of survivors deal with a changed world that is beyond their wildest comprehension.

Volume I, tells the stories of a band of a present-day extinction event survivors, in California, who survived due to a combination of fate, tenacity, and a will to live when millions perished. Their world changed forever, and they must face the challenges of surviving while retaining at least a small part of the technology and civilization which had been reaching for the stars.

A.G. Kimbrough, An Author/Publisher of Historical Fiction and Hard Science Fiction
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Offline blerg et al.

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Re: seeking great worldbuilding, share your books
« Reply #48 on: June 17, 2017, 07:01:06 PM »
My Dying World series is basically Star Wars, but with no spaceships.  ;D

Takes place millions (or maybe billions) of years in the future. The Oceans have dried up. No more trees and plants. Metal is very rare and highly sought after. Humanity survives in a precarious existence. Some people have evolved- a select few have mental powers called Vis. Males with this power are telekinetic and are called Magi. Women with this power are called Strigas and are telepathic.

I put a lot of emphasis on ecology- algae and underground fungi are primary food sources supplemented by hunting wild and dangerous beasts. Most tools are leather, stone, and bone. Iron based metals are subjected to the rusting sickness.

I also put in a bit of culture and stuff. The Magi and Strigas are constrained by very rigid traditions (Magi are emasculated, while Strigas are not allowed to marry and bear children). Belief in multiple gods are widespread, along with traditional concepts of survival and hospitality.

That's the short of it. Currently working on book 3 of the series.  ;)

The rusting sickness is an interesting mechanism. I've got a world where things deteriorate, though it's magic based and not biological or environmental. Funny thing is the book I got the idea from wasn't a fantasy book, it was House of Leaves. There, things that are left behind disintegrate within a couple of days. In mine, there is one particular place where weapons and armor deteriorate within a matter of months. Countries who try to conquer it have to set up settlements on the coast to forge a steady stream of new weaponry.

I'm curious, because your book is so far int he future, do you still have scraps of old-earth culture? Or is it so far forward that nothing has survived.
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Offline blerg et al.

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Re: seeking great worldbuilding, share your books
« Reply #49 on: June 17, 2017, 07:41:08 PM »
Okay,

We've been having a great conversation about worldbuilding,

but while I've got you here, how do you market your books?

Do you do anything different than other people in your genre? Do you play up your unique world or do you downplay it to fit a genre?
Cast in Sand: 80%

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Gulf Coast Poetry: 80%
Dustin Porta | art website | art facebook | author facebook | author website