Author Topic: seeking great worldbuilding, share your books  (Read 1948 times)  

Offline JTriptych

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Re: seeking great worldbuilding, share your books
« Reply #50 on: June 17, 2017, 08:42:56 PM »
The rusting sickness is an interesting mechanism. I've got a world where things deteriorate, though it's magic based and not biological or environmental. Funny thing is the book I got the idea from wasn't a fantasy book, it was House of Leaves. There, things that are left behind disintegrate within a couple of days. In mine, there is one particular place where weapons and armor deteriorate within a matter of months. Countries who try to conquer it have to set up settlements on the coast to forge a steady stream of new weaponry.

I'm curious, because your book is so far int he future, do you still have scraps of old-earth culture? Or is it so far forward that nothing has survived.
For research I went back to medieval (such as monks) and ancient societies (like tribes and their traditions) when it came to culture, but I more or less just created my own. I already did heavy research on world mythology because I wrote a PA-mythology series before so that was a big help in making up stories and legends to introduce it into this far future world. I just took bits and pieces of everything and mashed them up. It was fun!

As far as marketing this series, I sort of joined a few FB groups that catered to the Dying Earth/Planetary Romance subgenre of Sci-fi. Since the books are heavily influenced by the works of Jack Vance, Edgar Rice Burroughs, Gene Wolfe and such, I sort of joined fan groups to help promote it in a subtle way, as well as traditional book advertising.

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Re: seeking great worldbuilding, share your books
« Reply #51 on: June 17, 2017, 09:50:06 PM »
I'd be curious to see what you think of the worldbuilding in my novel, if you felt so inclined.

In short, the legend of Robin Hood is reborn in the American Apocalypse.

It's not nearly as in depth as some fantasy is, there isn't a ton of worldbuilding exposition--most of it you learn through the story--but I've gotten a goodly bit of complements on how real the world/characters/settings felt.

It's not all bleak and dreary, there's a lot of blue skies and sunshine, wild nature, abandoned and destroyed buildings. It's not so much the scorched-earth apocalypse as it is the destruction of civilization with the creation of new regional factions and small group survivors.

Some of the groups at play:
Clearwater crew (main character's small town survivor group)
Sons of Liberty (military vestige government in boston/new england)
Kaiser Militants (despotic wastelanders and survivors)
New Confederates (southern survivors)
Dead Hand Resistance (freedom fighters)
Federation of Texas (self-contained city-state oligarchy, think wild west all over again)
(and a secret group who I won't reveal)

among others. Many of those you don't come in contact with until books 2 and 3, but yeah, the feel of the story starts very survivor-esque, but it turns into very political and military rebuilding of civilization. So in a sense, it's very concerned with world building. Literally :D

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Re: seeking great worldbuilding, share your books
« Reply #52 on: June 18, 2017, 08:43:13 AM »
As far as marketing this series, I sort of joined a few FB groups that catered to the Dying Earth/Planetary Romance subgenre of Sci-fi. Since the books are heavily influenced by the works of Jack Vance, Edgar Rice Burroughs, Gene Wolfe and such, I sort of joined fan groups to help promote it in a subtle way, as well as traditional book advertising.
There are groups out there for Planetary Romance? That's, probably the closest thing to what I write, but I had just assumed it was too obscure and promoted mine as post apoc instead.
I'm going to look for some groups, but if you felt like pm'ing me some suggestions, I'd be eternally grateful.
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Re: seeking great worldbuilding, share your books
« Reply #53 on: June 18, 2017, 09:40:10 AM »
I'd be curious to see what you think of the worldbuilding in my novel, if you felt so inclined.

In short, the legend of Robin Hood is reborn in the American Apocalypse.

It's not nearly as in depth as some fantasy is, there isn't a ton of worldbuilding exposition--most of it you learn through the story--but I've gotten a goodly bit of complements on how real the world/characters/settings felt.

It's not all bleak and dreary, there's a lot of blue skies and sunshine, wild nature, abandoned and destroyed buildings. It's not so much the scorched-earth apocalypse as it is the destruction of civilization with the creation of new regional factions and small group survivors.

Some of the groups at play:
Clearwater crew (main character's small town survivor group)
Sons of Liberty (military vestige government in boston/new england)
Kaiser Militants (despotic wastelanders and survivors)
New Confederates (southern survivors)
Dead Hand Resistance (freedom fighters)
Federation of Texas (self-contained city-state oligarchy, think wild west all over again)
(and a secret group who I won't reveal)

among others. Many of those you don't come in contact with until books 2 and 3, but yeah, the feel of the story starts very survivor-esque, but it turns into very political and military rebuilding of civilization. So in a sense, it's very concerned with world building. Literally :D
Based Purely on your blurbs, covers, and previous threads that I've seen. I think you've hit on something awesome.

You've also hit on my biggest issue with Post Apoc, and that's the dreary, depressing bit. This is my day off, and I'm on my third cup of coffee, so apologies for the following rant and its obligatory typos.

I'm an optimistic guy, even in the worst situations I look for something beautiful. I think we all do.
I have a friend who was deployed in Afghanistan. And he had some pretty dark stories to tell, but the dark stuff was punctuated with beautiful vistas, dramatic, sweeping valleys, mountainsides covered in flowers, even the poppy fields were beautiful. I think you can't help but notice stuff like that when you're sleeping in a hole in the ground.

My favorite book about the Vietnam War is The Things They Carried, it's a collection of literary short stories, not a military procedural and it's more about the spiritual transformations, good and bad, that war brings about in the people who fight it. And the land, the jungles, rice paddies, rivers, feels very alive, almost a character in and of itself. I think that good genre fiction touches on these things too.

What you do is tough. Because the apocalypse in your books has happened recently, and there can't help but be a sense of loss. I've avoided this by setting my books far enough in the future that the apocalypse is largely forgotten. It is more a thing of antiquity than a recent traumatic event.

The apocalypse is actually a common fantasy trope, you see it in Tolkien, you see it in the Wheel of Time books with "The Breaking of the World," even the Dragonlance novels had "The Cataclysm" that upset the old ways, buried large parts of history, and set the stage for the novel that was to come. And I don't think it is a stretch to make this claim. I was looking up a Hemmingway quote a while ago. "amid so much ruin, still the beauty" I think it's from a Farewell to Arms. I typed the words into google, the fourth entry down in the search results was a wiki about Toliens Silmarillion. Those same words, in a different order, had come up in a sumary of the history of Middle Earth. 

To get back to what you said about not wanting your world to be too dark. I don't read much post apocalyptic fiction, but I can think of a lot of post-apocalyptic movies that feel dreary. On the other hand post apocalyptic movies that invoke a sense of wonder and excitement are fewer, and tend to be poorly reviewed. Waterworld is a good example. I also kind of like Reign of Fire. Pretty much any terrible movie that Dennis Hopper was in. But I love them. Some straddle this gap. Planet of the Apes, Mad Max, The 100, still a little dreary for me, but the worldbuilding keeps me along for the ride. And they have a bigger following than Waterworld.

I think your books must straddle the gap, hit both audiences, keep both audiences, and probably will do rather well.

Also, Station 11 is doing really well, which is great for post-apoc writers everywhere. I haven't started it yet, but I read the prologue, and it is an absolutely beautiful description of a post-apoc society that resembles something out of a Steinbeck novel, and the premise (a troupe of Shakespearian actors traveling from settlement to settlement) sounds enchanting and makes me want to read it for the same reason I like to read Chaucer.

For the tales. And yours, being based on Robin Hood, a favorite english folk tale, is poised to do really will in multiple genres. I would hope.
End of coffee rant. I'm off to work on my book today.
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Re: seeking great worldbuilding, share your books
« Reply #54 on: June 18, 2017, 11:09:19 AM »
Based Purely on your blurbs, covers, and previous threads that I've seen. I think you've hit on something awesome.

You've also hit on my biggest issue with Post Apoc, and that's the dreary, depressing bit. This is my day off, and I'm on my third cup of coffee, so apologies for the following rant and its obligatory typos.

I'm an optimistic guy, even in the worst situations I look for something beautiful. I think we all do.
I have a friend who was deployed in Afghanistan. And he had some pretty dark stories to tell, but the dark stuff was punctuated with beautiful vistas, dramatic, sweeping valleys, mountainsides covered in flowers, even the poppy fields were beautiful. I think you can't help but notice stuff like that when you're sleeping in a hole in the ground.

My favorite book about the Vietnam War is The Things They Carried, it's a collection of literary short stories, not a military procedural and it's more about the spiritual transformations, good and bad, that war brings about in the people who fight it. And the land, the jungles, rice paddies, rivers, feels very alive, almost a character in and of itself. I think that good genre fiction touches on these things too.

What you do is tough. Because the apocalypse in your books has happened recently, and there can't help but be a sense of loss. I've avoided this by setting my books far enough in the future that the apocalypse is largely forgotten. It is more a thing of antiquity than a recent traumatic event.

The apocalypse is actually a common fantasy trope, you see it in Tolkien, you see it in the Wheel of Time books with "The Breaking of the World," even the Dragonlance novels had "The Cataclysm" that upset the old ways, buried large parts of history, and set the stage for the novel that was to come. And I don't think it is a stretch to make this claim. I was looking up a Hemmingway quote a while ago. "amid so much ruin, still the beauty" I think it's from a Farewell to Arms. I typed the words into google, the fourth entry down in the search results was a wiki about Toliens Silmarillion. Those same words, in a different order, had come up in a sumary of the history of Middle Earth. 

To get back to what you said about not wanting your world to be too dark. I don't read much post apocalyptic fiction, but I can think of a lot of post-apocalyptic movies that feel dreary. On the other hand post apocalyptic movies that invoke a sense of wonder and excitement are fewer, and tend to be poorly reviewed. Waterworld is a good example. I also kind of like Reign of Fire. Pretty much any terrible movie that Dennis Hopper was in. But I love them. Some straddle this gap. Planet of the Apes, Mad Max, The 100, still a little dreary for me, but the worldbuilding keeps me along for the ride. And they have a bigger following than Waterworld.

I think your books must straddle the gap, hit both audiences, keep both audiences, and probably will do rather well.

Also, Station 11 is doing really well, which is great for post-apoc writers everywhere. I haven't started it yet, but I read the prologue, and it is an absolutely beautiful description of a post-apoc society that resembles something out of a Steinbeck novel, and the premise (a troupe of Shakespearian actors traveling from settlement to settlement) sounds enchanting and makes me want to read it for the same reason I like to read Chaucer.

For the tales. And yours, being based on Robin Hood, a favorite english folk tale, is poised to do really will in multiple genres. I would hope.
End of coffee rant. I'm off to work on my book today.

I think, then, that you and I are birds of a feather my friend. That story about your friend from Afghanistan is very moving. I've never been in a war or known any recent veterans, but I imagine those kinds of things are true. I often think that under the worst duress or greatest times of challenge do we see the world so vividly.

Actually, one of the most important lines and themes in my book is "The world is still beautiful" as well as "There's still something more than survival worth fighting for."

I never read the things they carried, but it sounds like i'd love it. I've heard a ton about it and it's supposed to be pretty unreal.

Actually, one of my favorite things about writing Book 1 in a time shortly after the apoc is the thoughts and feelings of those who can compare the old world to the new. I'm kind of in love with the idea that we can carry the old world with us in our minds even when everything has changed, and that people with personalities developed in the civilized world can survive in a world without civilization.

I totally agree about fantasy. My series is sort of a Post-apoc and fantasy hybrid, with the emphasis on post-apoc. I think the two genres are way more connected than people think. I grew up loving fantasy and it's still my favorite genre. The Dragonlance series and the Death Gate Cycle I ate up as a kid. There's so much of the death and rebirth of "ages" and "civilizations" in fantasy, and in some extent to our own world. I think the two ideas are strongly connected. That's part of what inspired me to write this series. I mean, in history we have dark ages, great empires, world wars, renaissances, industrial revolutions. The world is always changing drastically, in real life and in fantasy.

Thank you for the kind words. I believe my books straddle that gap pretty well too, though sometimes I have to reel the dark part in. I'm an optimistic-realist by my own estimation, so this sort of balance of empowering and also gritty survival fits my style perfectly. Also I love the Robin Hood Legend, and the idea that it keeps repeating itself through history is an idea I couldn't shake.

If you love that sort of stuff, you'd absolutely love The Last of Us. It's a post-apoc video game with an absolutely earthshaking story. It's my favorite, and it's very much in the style of my books. I remember seeing Waterworld when I was like 9 haha. Fury Road was incredible, though definitely on the dark side. I haven't read station 11 but I've heard amazing things.

Thanks for the Coffee rant. I enjoyed it. Kick some ass on that book :D
Evan


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Offline Jeff Tanyard

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Re: seeking great worldbuilding, share your books
« Reply #55 on: June 18, 2017, 08:38:33 PM »
There are groups out there for Planetary Romance? That's, probably the closest thing to what I write, but I had just assumed it was too obscure and promoted mine as post apoc instead.

The problem with "Planetary Romance" is that too many people see the "romance" part and come to the wrong conclusion.  It's a troublesome term for that reason, and I think you made the right choice to promote your work as post-apocalyptic instead.
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Offline JTriptych

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Re: seeking great worldbuilding, share your books
« Reply #56 on: June 18, 2017, 09:29:37 PM »
There are groups out there for Planetary Romance? That's, probably the closest thing to what I write, but I had just assumed it was too obscure and promoted mine as post apoc instead.
I'm going to look for some groups, but if you felt like pm'ing me some suggestions, I'd be eternally grateful.
There's an FB group called Planetary Romance as well as Sword and Planet. A few thousand members each and very casual, so they would be a nice start.

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Re: seeking great worldbuilding, share your books
« Reply #57 on: June 19, 2017, 11:26:21 AM »
Are any of these books we've been talking about especially good in audiobook?

I've got a serious backlog for my reading. But my listening schedule is wide open.

 Just finished Garrett B Robinsons nightblade box set, and that was a well narrated, fun listen. Light on the worldbuilding, but I have listened to his vlog long enough, I know he is building up to a larger epic where the scope gets a lot broader.
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Offline jlstovall4

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Re: seeking great worldbuilding, share your books
« Reply #58 on: June 19, 2017, 01:28:38 PM »
Remind me of another favorite quote. "Err on the side of awesome."
I always choose what is the most fun. Why write if it isn't fun.
If you're writing in three different worlds, are they all standalone, or will they be series? Keeping three series going seems like a big commitment.

Three different worlds with their own series attached. My goal for my YA series is that it'll be 5 books in the beginning, a way to test the YA market. My MG series (both of them) are really what I love to write. So I'm testing the waters to see where I can find a bit of love. None of the series will be longer than 12 books. So why that sounds like a lot, many of the books are the half-books like 1.5, 2.5 and such. More detail for those interested in going deeper with the series. When I do make a world, it tends to be pretty rich with life. It seems a shame to me, not to explore it.  :)

Sorry for the late reply  :P

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Re: seeking great worldbuilding, share your books
« Reply #59 on: June 19, 2017, 05:38:07 PM »
I'm not sure whether I strictly qualify as world-building, since my (fantasy) world is a secondary world - like this one, but with several important differences!

I suppose the key difference is that due to a mini Ice Age Europe is a backwater, and the main technological impetus comes from China and India.

The other thing is that it's set in 19th century France, with a group of explorers and engineers building a railway into the lost interior of the country. They start running into people who have got stuck in the Middle Ages, and a massive culture clash ensues.

There's also a lot of slightly off-whack religions. Most of the main religions are Goddess-based, but some are still pretty patriarchal.

And then there's the magic. My main characters have magical powers, but they're called shamans because they're particularly good at hopping into the underworld, and other worlds altogether.

The most important person is a teenage girl, and she grows up through the course of the books. In the first book, she's 13. She's part of a large, complicated and eccentric family - or two families. And the whole thing follows the working out a curse on one family that gradually takes out a whole lot of characters.
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Online Douglas Milewski

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Re: seeking great worldbuilding, share your books
« Reply #60 on: June 19, 2017, 06:04:05 PM »
I've built the world of Endhaven over a several series of novels. It features a few elements that make it interesting.
  • The inhabitants don't have a word for magic even though magic is all over the place. All magic is thought of as acquired skills or innate traits. Because of this, nobody casts spells, but everyone keeps secrets.
  • This world is the last of all possible worlds, with a mismatched and incomplete set of gods doing their best to keep it around.
  • Destiny is dead. She had an argument with the goddess of death about who gets the last say and lost. Now, because of her death, all the institutions built on destiny are slowly unraveling.
  • Sufficiently advanced magic is indistinguishable from technology.
  • The friendly gods are terrible, and the terrible gods are reprehensible.
  • The gods are real, so religion matters. The books all contain deep religious themes.
  • Familiar fantasy elements, created in the past, now exist in a time period different from the one that invented them, keeping everything from fitting ever so neatly.
The more that I write in this place, the better that I like it.
« Last Edit: June 19, 2017, 06:08:11 PM by Douglas Milewski »

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Re: seeking great worldbuilding, share your books
« Reply #61 on: June 19, 2017, 09:09:38 PM »
Are any of these books we've been talking about especially good in audiobook?

I've got a serious backlog for my reading. But my listening schedule is wide open.

 Just finished Garrett B Robinsons nightblade box set, and that was a well narrated, fun listen. Light on the worldbuilding, but I have listened to his vlog long enough, I know he is building up to a larger epic where the scope gets a lot broader.

Hood is live as an audiobook, hit me up if you're interested!

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Re: seeking great worldbuilding, share your books
« Reply #62 on: June 20, 2017, 07:15:51 AM »
I'm not sure whether I strictly qualify as world-building, since my (fantasy) world is a secondary world - like this one, but with several important differences!

I'd say not only does it count, but it's actually harder because you had to do more research. I guess it helps if you're already familiar with those cultures, though personally, the more I learn about any particular culture the more I feel under-qualified to represent it. How much research do you do, and when do you decide, okay, time to stop and write the damn thing.


   
  • Sufficiently advanced magic is indistinguishable from technology.
  • The friendly gods are terrible, and the terrible gods are reprehensible.
  • The gods are real, so religion matters. The books all contain deep religious themes.

Makes sense. If you go back far enough in history, the line between science and magic kind of blurs.

I always thought that the Dungeons and Dragons model for magic versus religion was interesting.(I'm not an expert on dnd lore, so forgive me if I am way off base.)

You had wizards, who were already doing supernatural things, but doing so by following a set of natural, or supernatural laws, parallel to the natural laws of the world. They were, essentially, a group of scientists who had made a different set of breakthroughs and written their discoveries down in spellbooks.

And then you had clerics, who were the wielders of the powers granted to them by the dieties. They could either break the laws of magic, or wield them in ways beyond mortal abilities, by channeling powers granted to them by their respective dieties. They didn't do magic, they worked miracles. This is different than a lot of worlds, where magic is simply some offshoot of divine power, or divine power is simply a higher level of magic.

I don't know where I was going with that...

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Re: seeking great worldbuilding, share your books
« Reply #63 on: June 20, 2017, 07:33:51 PM »
I always thought that the Dungeons and Dragons model for magic versus religion was interesting.(I'm not an expert on dnd lore, so forgive me if I am way off base.)

You had wizards, who were already doing supernatural things, but doing so by following a set of natural, or supernatural laws, parallel to the natural laws of the world. They were, essentially, a group of scientists who had made a different set of breakthroughs and written their discoveries down in spellbooks.

And then you had clerics, who were the wielders of the powers granted to them by the dieties. They could either break the laws of magic, or wield them in ways beyond mortal abilities, by channeling powers granted to them by their respective dieties. They didn't do magic, they worked miracles. This is different than a lot of worlds, where magic is simply some offshoot of divine power, or divine power is simply a higher level of magic.

I don't know where I was going with that...

DnD is awesome, that's where you were going with that. A+

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Re: seeking great worldbuilding, share your books
« Reply #64 on: June 20, 2017, 08:46:25 PM »
I'd say not only does it count, but it's actually harder because you had to do more research. I guess it helps if you're already familiar with those cultures, though personally, the more I learn about any particular culture the more I feel under-qualified to represent it. How much research do you do, and when do you decide, okay, time to stop and write the damn thing.

I know just what you mean. And it's easy to get carried away by research, and try to put it all in! I've tried to stick with cultures where I knew something to begin with. I didn't want to write traditional epic fantasy, though I enjoy reading it.

This has been a fun thread to read - have you gleaned anything from it?
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Re: seeking great worldbuilding, share your books
« Reply #65 on: June 22, 2017, 07:57:49 PM »
I like this thread.
Actually, I like talking about this stuff in general. It's alot easier than trying to write a newsletter.
And when I log off, I'm more excited to get back to my own work.

This is what the authors I read spend their time doing. Talking craft, or talking about other people's books.

I found this the other day.
Stack Exchange for Worldbuilders
https://worldbuilding.stackexchange.com/

The standard of discourse is...daunting. A lot of very smart people over there.
But I think it would be a good place to have more chats like this one.
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Offline jlstovall4

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Re: seeking great worldbuilding, share your books
« Reply #66 on: June 23, 2017, 03:08:13 AM »
I found this the other day.
Stack Exchange for Worldbuilders
https://worldbuilding.stackexchange.com/

Thanks for the website.

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World Building--A Day Late & A Dollar Short
« Reply #67 on: June 29, 2017, 01:01:43 PM »
Sorry about being late to the conversation. I read kboards on my phone and post on my computer, but many thoughts get lost or delayed in transition.

My approach to world building factors in my low daily word count, i.e. I build only what I need and use those aspects in multiple ways. In Life on Nubis I inverted and scrambled biological traits, ecological systems, and evolutionary outcomes on Earth to create an alien ecosystem logically consistent with scientific principles. Not exactly hard sci fi but the flora and fauna fit with their environment. Many of the ecosystem elements serve double duty as plot devices and metaphors for the book's theme (or brief comments on secondary themes). I intentionally hid the metaphors in varying levels of abstraction to make the novel enjoyable on multiple levels from entertaining superficial read to (hopefully) insightful commentary on the human condition.

I took a different approach in Dense Space. The world drives plot, theme, and character development in equal measure. I meter out understanding as needed to move both aspects of the story forward. I consider the world in Dense Space more shallow (in a literary sense) than the world in Life on Nubis but equally important to the story.

I liked the tone and metaphors of the world in Cormac McCarthy's The Road.

This raises a couple of interesting questions.
1. How deep do you build your worlds and why?
2. What do you use them for?

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Re: World Building--A Day Late & A Dollar Short
« Reply #68 on: June 29, 2017, 08:24:56 PM »
Many of the t elements serve double duty as plot devices and metaphors for the book's theme (or brief comments on secondary themes). I intentionally hid the metaphors in varying levels of abstraction to make the novel enjoyable on multiple levels from entertaining superficial read to (hopefully) insightful commentary on the human condition.

I took a different approach in Dense Space. The world drives plot, theme, and character development in equal measure. I meter out understanding as needed to move both aspects of the story forward. I consider the world in Dense Space more shallow (in a literary sense) than the world in Life on Nubis but equally important to the story.

Sounds familiar.

My first books had metaphor and imagery, themes that it explored, and I like to think that it was all fairly subtle. But with so much freeform world building, I lost track of the plot. I found an ending eventually, but it wasn't as tidy as it should have been.

What was it Vonnegut said: Each line should either reveal character, or advance the plot.
Something like that.

There should be a way to build a world in a way that reveals character and advances the plot.
Maybe your third series will be a hybrid of the first two methods, and will be perfect.

As for the how and why I build my world...I'm not sure I know exactly...I'll think on that.
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Offline JTriptych

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Re: seeking great worldbuilding, share your books
« Reply #69 on: June 29, 2017, 09:39:27 PM »
This may be off tangent but instead of worldbuilding for my hard sci-fi series I did a bit of futurism instead- I tried to imagine what the world would be like in 50-60 years down the road.

I ended up with everybody wearing a google glass type device on their eyes that projects virtual images directly on their wearable lenses- this device works as a smart phone and mobile internet server all at the same time. I also included drones, self-driving cars and hypersonic transport airliners. The UN also decides to ban children from going into space because of growth defects due to low gravity in colonies like Mars.

On the sociology side I added PETR- people for the ethical treatment of robots. A bunch of fanatics that proclaim robots are people too and must be protected from abuse.  ;D

Offline harken

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Re: seeking great worldbuilding, share your books
« Reply #70 on: July 01, 2017, 01:43:52 PM »
What was it Vonnegut said: Each line should either reveal character, or advance the plot.
Something like that.

There should be a way to build a world in a way that reveals character and advances the plot.
Maybe your third series will be a hybrid of the first two methods, and will be perfect.

As for the how and why I build my world...I'm not sure I know exactly...I'll think on that.

I'm skeptical about a perfect means of building a world. It's tempting to think that a person v. nature or person v. society conflict requires a deeper world than a person v. person story. Both Life on Nubis and Dense Space contain nature and society sub-conflicts, but the primary conflict in each is person v. self. The theme in Life on Nubis is broader than the theme in Dense Space, so I needed less space in Dense Space (groan-inducing pun intended).

I offer that theme scale and complexity is one heuristic for world building. Considering the world in A Song of Fire and Ice, I think Martin drew a deep world to convey scale in his political themes. A Brave New World sketches each world sufficiently to contrast them for the philosophical dilemma.

These thoughts reflect my writing preferences for parsimony and starting with a theme--in contravention to Steven King's work and advice. I asked the world depth question because I think writers with different preferences may have different perspectives.