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Kindle Edition published 2016-01-12
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Product Description
With the odd disappearance of her parents, Gussie Gibson has lived her entire life with her granny on a peaceful pecan orchard, owned by the meanest man in all of Georgia—Mr. J.P. Combs. Granny teaches Gussie many valuable life lessons as a black woman growing up in the still-segregated south. Mr. Combs is an evil underhanded banker who takes liberties beyond his privilege. When Granny dies, Combs informs Gussie she owes him back rent—but he wants much more than money for payment—and more than Gussie can live with.
After defending herself against his sexual advances, Gussie flees to escape certain vigilante justice when she meets a charming, handsome stranger, Sam Johnson, who is just returning from World War II.
Gussie and Sam’s friendship is short-lived when Mr. Combs hunts her down and drags her back to Green Ridge, driven by his craving for revenge and a grudge too deep to comprehend. Gussie fights to return to Sam and his lo...

Author Topic: Amazon's fake book problem  (Read 18140 times)  

Offline thesmallprint

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Re: Amazon's fake book problem
« Reply #100 on: June 16, 2017, 03:00:00 AM »
Quote
Just to clarify, I DO have a problem with actual scammers. Those that manipulate rank, reviews, borrows, pages read, etc. People who split their novels up in KU1 or those adding bonus books in KU2? They're not scammers, unless they engage in black hat methods to get those books moving. They're just working within a faulty system Amazon created.

Based on your last sentence, there are no scammers. Even those working click farms aren't scammers.

Offline NeedWant

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Re: Amazon's fake book problem
« Reply #101 on: June 16, 2017, 03:11:25 AM »
Based on your last sentence, there are no scammers. Even those working click farms aren't scammers.

Based on your last sentence, you don't think those working click farms are scammers. :o

And this isn't aimed at you, but something people seem to forget is that many of us were already writing erotica shorts, and doing DANG WELL, when KU1 hit. We didn't ask for the 10% payout, didn't demand it, but there it was.

I just looked back at my historical data and I actually started publishing erotica in 2013 when the only borrows came from Prime members. I did take it a lot more seriously when KU1 came along and it's always been about $$$ for me. If someone wants to judge me for that, judge away!

Offline thesmallprint

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Re: Amazon's fake book problem
« Reply #102 on: June 16, 2017, 03:59:18 AM »
Based on your last sentence, you don't think those working click farms are scammers. :o



I'm in two minds now. You made a point that KU1 featured ultra-shorts which took advantage of the system. That's what click farms are doing. If those gaming the KU1 system weren't scamming, how are those gaming the current system scamming?  If click farms are scamming, then KU1 gamers were scamming.  You, me, whoever, cannot have it both ways.

Offline NeedWant

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Re: Amazon's fake book problem
« Reply #103 on: June 16, 2017, 04:04:24 AM »
I'm in two minds now. You made a point that KU1 featured ultra-shorts which took advantage of the system. That's what click farms are doing. If those gaming the KU1 system weren't scamming, how are those gaming the current system scamming?  If click farms are scamming, then KU1 gamers were scamming.  You, me, whoever, cannot have it both ways.

Sorry, not sure I get what you're trying to say. Writing shorts when shorts are more profitable is not scamming. Writing long when longer works are profitable is not scamming.

Publishing gibberish copy and pasted from the internet is scamming. Using click farms that borrow your books is scamming.

What's confusing you here?

Offline MonkeyScribe

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Re: Amazon's fake book problem
« Reply #104 on: June 16, 2017, 04:21:10 AM »
I'm in two minds now. You made a point that KU1 featured ultra-shorts which took advantage of the system. That's what click farms are doing. If those gaming the KU1 system weren't scamming, how are those gaming the current system scamming?  If click farms are scamming, then KU1 gamers were scamming.  You, me, whoever, cannot have it both ways.

That makes no sense. Someone writing short stories was tailoring their fiction to the ecosystem as it existed. It may have been gaming, in a certain sense, but it was in no way against the TOS or in any other way shady behavior. I say that as someone who only writes novel length work and has benefited from the changes.

A click farm, on the other hand, is most definitely against the TOS, and is nothing short of fraud. I'm surprised you don't see the difference.

Offline Amanda M. Lee

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Re: Amazon's fake book problem
« Reply #105 on: June 16, 2017, 05:08:56 AM »
The thing is, Amazon didn't say that "they" preferred longer works. They said customers preferred longer works and went into great detail about what customers wanted. They gave authors a chance to correct themselves, and it didn't happen. Since customers always get what they want on Amazon, they were trying to steer people to create the ecosystem that they needed to sustain KU. Authors were warning more than six months before the change came down that page reads were going to be the new thing. People heard rumblings. I told people that a good three or four months before the switch and people told me I was crazy. It was right here and I got called every name in the book.
Now, I don't equate "writing short" with bot scamming in the slightest. I'm a firm believer in writing something for what it's worth, not padding for length. HOWEVER, people were publishing ten-page scamphlets that opened at 10 percent. People were breaking apart books into chapters just to get more in payout. People were purposely writing 20-page serials with no ending and no story structure just in the hope that people would open it so they could get a payout. Be very honest. Do you think that's what Amazon had in mind for the program? How did anyone think that was sustainable? It wasn't. Everyone knew it. Authors could've corrected themselves and saved the previous payout but they didn't. Why do you think that is?
I'm not saying that everyone who writes short is scamming by any stretch of the imagination. I have shorts in my most popular series (although my idea of a short is 28K words). What happened with KU1 was indeed a big scam on SOME people's parts. I can't make you remember what was happening at the time, but it was as big a deal as the link scammers.
So, yeah. People abusing KU1 got us KU2. Now, people abusing KU2 will get us KU3 at some point (probably sooner rather than later). When that happens, we'll here more screaming. If people would simply conduct themselves in an ethical manner, though, it wouldn't be necessary. People won't, though, so the hammer will come again ... and again ... and again.

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Offline Gentleman Zombie

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Re: Amazon's fake book problem
« Reply #106 on: June 16, 2017, 05:31:47 AM »
I think people are lumping KU1 shorts writers together with KU1 scammers - and that's not really fair. I wrote shorts back then. Mine were in a very small erotica niche (Transgender). I had great reviews and was even featured on a transgender erotica blog. Sure small potatoes.. but it was very reliable. Plus, at the time I felt like I  served an unmet need. I certainly didn't consider myself a scammer. Nor did I break up novels or any some such. I knew of other people who were raking it in with Paranormal & Romance Serials. I don't consider them scammers either.

But Amanda is right, there others who were publishing gibberish books just to get the 10% payout. But please don't lump all shorts writers into that boat, because it's not fair. And yes. Amazon was very clear that readers wanted longer books in KU. Which is how we got KU2 - it devastated a lot of authors while pushing others into the stratosphere.

Now we have people writing long as possible. Hell - I'm throwing my hat into the fantasy ring because I see it as a win-win. I love fantasy. Fantasy readers love long books & KU loves longs books. If I manage to pull this off, it could be a boost to my writing career. But just as in KU1 you have people taking advantage. Most of these scammers are from the IM crowd. They just publish 1,000-page gibberish books and then click-farm their way to a massive payout.   >:(

I don't consider them in the same class as the Fantasy or SciFi writer putting out 90,000-word epics. Or bundling up massive omnibus releases. Heck, even the romance and erotica writers are bundling up their work and including bonus stories. As long it's quality fiction (not spun gibberish) that the reader enjoys, no harm no foul.

But as long as KU exists - people are going to scam it.  It's a finite amount of money in a pool that authors are fighting over Hunger Games style. And just like the Hunger Games, some people are going to do anything to win. Even after KU3 arrives (and it will) this is going to be the case. It sucks, but a system like KU  gives scammers an incentive.

But I'm no idiot. Scammers and KU are here to stay. Neither one is going anywhere.
« Last Edit: June 16, 2017, 05:38:00 AM by Gentleman Zombie »

Offline NeedWant

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Re: Amazon's fake book problem
« Reply #107 on: June 16, 2017, 06:35:05 AM »
HOWEVER, people were publishing ten-page scamphlets that opened at 10 percent. People were breaking apart books into chapters just to get more in payout. People were purposely writing 20-page serials with no ending and no story structure just in the hope that people would open it so they could get a payout. Be very honest. Do you think that's what Amazon had in mind for the program? How did anyone think that was sustainable? It wasn't. Everyone knew it. Authors could've corrected themselves and saved the previous payout but they didn't. Why do you think that is?

I don't think lumping actual scammers publishing gibberish and using click farms with authors writing serials (however structured) is helpful. I mean, you have a right to your opinion, but I vehemently disagree with it. No, writing a serial or even dividing a novel into parts isn't abusing or scamming KU. It also doesn't magically make readers/subscribers flock to those particular authors' books. KU1 fed a voracious short erotica reader base. Popular serials became popular because the authors hooked those readers on their stories...that takes skill. There were plenty of failed shorts and serials as well.

At the end, I don't think it matters whether readers or Amazon preferred novels. It was clear to a lot of people that Amazon did not want KU to be known as Smut Central. It simply didn't fit the image they wanted to portray, even though short erotica was clearly what a lot of KU subscribers came for.

Basically, while I do think KU will continue changing, I think your blame is misplaced. I blame the actual scammers and Amazon for not thinking things through properly. I don't blame legitimate authors who are trying to do what's best for their bank accounts. This idea that if authors just behaved (how exactly? by not publishing shorts?) then we'd still have KU1 is faulty. We don't have KU1 because of click farms and Amazon's own ideas of what they wanted KU to be. KU2 will become KU3 because of scammers (no, authors publishing bundles aren't scammers) and because of whatever Amazon wants KU to look like next (or how much they're willing to spend on this venture).

Offline PaulineMRoss

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Re: Amazon's fake book problem
« Reply #108 on: June 16, 2017, 07:12:31 AM »
I blame the actual scammers and Amazon for not thinking things through properly. I don't blame legitimate authors who are trying to do what's best for their bank accounts.

The problem is that the world doesn't divide neatly into legitimate authors and scammers. There are plenty of people out there who are not using click farms or bots, but are still taking steps to maximise revenue that are less than ethical. It's one thing to say that KU1 prefers short work so you'll write shorts, or that KU2 benefits long work, so you'll switch to epic fantasy. That's fine. But adding a complete book (or several) to the back of the headline book? That gets a bit dodgy. And putting the epilogue to the headline book after the bonus books, so the author gets every possible cent of KU money? Very dodgy. It's not a black or white situation (in my view; you may disagree).
   

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Re: Amazon's fake book problem
« Reply #109 on: June 16, 2017, 07:38:44 AM »
The problem is that the world doesn't divide neatly into legitimate authors and scammers. There are plenty of people out there who are not using click farms or bots, but are still taking steps to maximise revenue that are less than ethical. It's one thing to say that KU1 prefers short work so you'll write shorts, or that KU2 benefits long work, so you'll switch to epic fantasy. That's fine. But adding a complete book (or several) to the back of the headline book? That gets a bit dodgy. And putting the epilogue to the headline book after the bonus books, so the author gets every possible cent of KU money? Very dodgy. It's not a black or white situation (in my view; you may disagree).

I think this fits the saying: Just because you have the right to do something doesn't mean that you are right to do it  ;).

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Offline NeedWant

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Re: Amazon's fake book problem
« Reply #110 on: June 16, 2017, 07:44:18 AM »
The problem is that the world doesn't divide neatly into legitimate authors and scammers. There are plenty of people out there who are not using click farms or bots, but are still taking steps to maximise revenue that are less than ethical. It's one thing to say that KU1 prefers short work so you'll write shorts, or that KU2 benefits long work, so you'll switch to epic fantasy. That's fine. But adding a complete book (or several) to the back of the headline book? That gets a bit dodgy. And putting the epilogue to the headline book after the bonus books, so the author gets every possible cent of KU money? Very dodgy. It's not a black or white situation (in my view; you may disagree).

Adding a book at the end of a book and being upfront about it in the blurb? I wouldn't do it, but I don't consider it scamming. Unless Amazon actually says that's not allowed, those authors are just trying to get more page reads. The reader can stop after book 1 if they so prefer. Putting the epilogue of book 1 behind one or more extra books is scamming in my opinion. Using linking within the book ("click here if you want to see the glossary that's at the end of this book that'll help you understand stuff throughout this book!") I would also consider scammy behavior. Bundling ten of your novels (or however many to get to that 3000 cap) isn't scamming. I think it's a scam on Amazon's part that they have a cap on pages read, and I will never get even close to having a bundle that large. It's just the principle of the thing. If you're going to pay us by pages read, then pay for all the pages read. Don't come up with a freaking limit. Edit: Oh, and I would tell Amazon this: if you're going to pay us by pages read, make sure you can count an actual page when it's read. A lot of scams ("click to the back of the book first") would be solved if they actually knew how to count a damn page!

So yeah, the world isn't black and white, but I'm personally pretty clear on what I consider to be scamming or unethical behavior. I'm not sure if Amazon is clear or even cares, though. Didn't John Locke admit to buying reviews? Or it was somehow found out that he did? His books are still on Amazon.
« Last Edit: June 16, 2017, 08:11:02 AM by NeedWant »

Offline LilyBLily

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Re: Amazon's fake book problem
« Reply #111 on: June 16, 2017, 08:03:17 AM »
If you're going to talk about buying reviews, that's an area that deeply involves authors who see themselves as ethical even while behaving in a manner that is against Amazon's TOS. It's not illegal to incentivize a review, but it is against TOS. Yet I know plenty of authors who do it, anyway. And despite all their little gift cards and swag giveaways, the truth is that no one would think them unethical if they simply ponied up the big money to straightforwardly buy reviews from Kirkus and that crowd. And why are reviews bought? To qualify to buy ads. It's crazy, but it's what the market demands and rewards. That's exactly what KU1 did, demanded and rewarded shorts. KU2 rewards longs. As authors in business to make money, we respond to the market as best we can. That doesn't make us unethical; it makes us businesslike.

Offline Gentleman Zombie

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Re: Amazon's fake book problem
« Reply #112 on: June 16, 2017, 08:05:04 AM »

At the end, I don't think it matters whether readers or Amazon preferred novels. It was clear to a lot of people that Amazon did not want KU to be known as Smut Central. It simply didn't fit the image they wanted to portray, even though short erotica was clearly what a lot of KU subscribers came for.

Oh my god thank you saying this. Even before KU was a thing - readers were happily paying $2.99 for short erotica without a complaint. The kinkier the better. Then KU came along and erotica exploded. Not because of people gaming the system - quite the opposite. Because now readers could get their erotica fix cheaply. I recall looking at the Amazon store front at one point and it was wall-to-wall erotica. Racy covers and all. I remember shaking my head and thinking there was no way Amazon was going to let this continue. Many of those authors & readers have since moved on to steamy romance with man-chest covers. And oddly enough - I bet they are still a driving force behind KU's popularity.

Basically, while I do think KU will continue changing, I think your blame is misplaced. I blame the actual scammers and Amazon for not thinking things through properly. I don't blame legitimate authors who are trying to do what's best for their bank accounts. This idea that if authors just behaved (how exactly? by not publishing shorts?) then we'd still have KU1 is faulty. We don't have KU1 because of click farms and Amazon's own ideas of what they wanted KU to be. KU2 will become KU3 because of scammers (no, authors publishing bundles aren't scammers) and because of whatever Amazon wants KU to look like next (or how much they're willing to spend on this venture).

I don't think bundle publishers are scammers either. But I'm quietly waiting for Amazon to declare that only single titles are allowed in KU. Which wont'  stop people from smashing several books together and calling it an epic saga. Or some other inventive way around the rule that I'm not clever enough to come with.

And the band plays on!

Offline she-la-ti-da

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Re: Amazon's fake book problem
« Reply #113 on: June 16, 2017, 11:09:47 AM »
Let's call the bonuses what they really are, a bribe to top sellers to stay exclusive.


Yeah. In the beginning, there was little to entice anyone to have a book in Select and not be able to sell it everywhere. Only the "free" days each month. Then KU came along, and what was there to make that profitable? So, bonuses and having borrows count for rank.

Also, before it's all said and done, I look for all omnibuses to be yanked from KU. It will be a "one title, one time" ecosystem. One book per title, one title in the program. No bonus books. Period. When it happens, we're going to hear crying and screaming. The people determined to scam Amazon are creating the situation, though. It's just like with KU1. The people crying loudest when the switch was made to page reads were the ones breaking up books and purposely creating books that opened at 10 percent to trigger a full payout. Now bonus books and omnibuses will be next to go, and we'll hear more screaming. I don't know what people expect, though. They're purposely trying to game the system and it's going to come back to bite them.

This is going to happen, and probably not too long from now, I'd suspect. Scamming KU has become such a huge money maker, something drastic is going to have to be done. I think we've already seen KUv3, so this will be KUv4. And man, are people going to howl.

And I agree that the whole thing with "readers prefer novels" was because erotica was burning it up in KU. It's like Scribd cutting out a lot of romance from their subscription service, because romance readers will read a lot of books. It comes down to how much money was being lost, and the reputation of being "erotica central", with all the nasty books on the front page.

I think Amazon started KU without thoroughly thinking it through. I said from the beginning that there needed to be some sort of tiered system for payouts, and some way to catch people rigging the start page, but Amazon just kept on. The person who came up with KU should probably have lost their job, but I bet they got bonuses and atta-boys.

Personally, I think reading books is different from watching TV or movies. With the latter, you have to watch when the networks said it was airing something. So being able to binge watch your fav show, or watching while on a long commute makes sense.

Books? You already can read when and where you want, even carrying a paperback or hard back book isn't that big a deal. The only thing subscriptions are good for is for those who read tons of books. They can do it cheaper with a sub. But, that doesn't work so well for the company doing the subscription. They lose money on people like that. I've seen it compared to gyms who make money on members who don't use the services, against those who go all out and come every day. Amazon can only come out ahead if people are buying other stuff from them, and if there's ever any decent competition for that, then say goodbye to KU.
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Offline Dolphin

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Re: Amazon's fake book problem
« Reply #114 on: June 16, 2017, 03:01:23 PM »
I think Amazon started KU without thoroughly thinking it through. I said from the beginning that there needed to be some sort of tiered system for payouts, and some way to catch people rigging the start page, but Amazon just kept on. The person who came up with KU should probably have lost their job, but I bet they got bonuses and atta-boys.

Quote from: Jeff Bezos
Second, most decisions should probably be made with somewhere around 70% of the information you wish you had. If you wait for 90%, in most cases, you're probably being slow. Plus, either way, you need to be good at quickly recognizing and correcting bad decisions. If you're good at course correcting, being wrong may be less costly than you think, whereas being slow is going to be expensive for sure.

I'd imagine whoever implemented KU was promoted with Jeff's blessing. I'm not in a position to second-guess Jeff. Are you?

Scammers are an operating expense for them, not a priority. KU1 failed and got revised because it was destroying the experience for the customer. Fairness to authors had nothing to do with it, except insofar as author participation drives customer satisfaction. You don't need to eliminate scammers to maintain the KDPS rolls.

Amazon can only come out ahead if people are buying other stuff from them, and if there's ever any decent competition for that, then say goodbye to KU.

Yeah, I'm not worried about that anytime soon. Their biggest danger is that they become so big as to usher in a new era of trust-busting. The only threat to Amazon is Amazon.

Offline Laran Mithras

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Re: Amazon's fake book problem
« Reply #115 on: June 16, 2017, 04:48:45 PM »
Just to pitch in, I'm an erotica author. I do not bundle. I do not put out 1000 page snorefests of grouped backlist stories.

Under the current climate of KU2, I'm hurting myself by not doing so. But I still don't.

What's "right" and what's "wrong," except our sensibilities on ethics? If the TOS allows bundles that are good today, will we be pilloried for it tomorrow under KU3 in hindsight?

I am ruled by my ethics. If it doesn't sound right to my inner ear - to my soul - I don't do it and many say I'm not "promoting properly."
 

Offline Dolphin

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Re: Amazon's fake book problem
« Reply #116 on: June 16, 2017, 05:08:21 PM »
I am ruled by my ethics. If it doesn't sound right to my inner ear - to my soul - I don't do it and many say I'm not "promoting properly."

Why does it feel like there's an ethical difference between selling The Lord of the Rings instead of selling The Fellowship of the Ring, The Two Towers, and The Return of the King separately?

If you're writing shorts, did you feel like that was unethical during KU1, but became ethical again during KU2?

Suppose you seek out the advice of a developmental editor, and she says that you're telling three distinct stories and should break them up into separate books to avoid confusing the reader. Is that ethical? What if her advice had been that your story was incomplete, and you need to add another 20,000 words to finish it?

Is advertising unethical? What about using a mailing list? Do you think all marketing is ethically dubious, or just the product development and merchandizing phases?

I'm not trying to badger you. The point I'm trying to make is that none of this is clearcut, and ethical arguments are difficult to sustain in this territory.

Offline Laran Mithras

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Re: Amazon's fake book problem
« Reply #117 on: June 16, 2017, 05:12:29 PM »
Why does it feel like there's an ethical difference between selling The Lord of the Rings instead of selling The Fellowship of the Ring, The Two Towers, and The Return of the King separately?

If you're writing shorts, did you feel like that was unethical during KU1, but became ethical again during KU2?

Suppose you seek out the advice of a developmental editor, and she says that you're telling three distinct stories and should break them up into separate books to avoid confusing the reader. Is that ethical? What if her advice had been that your story was incomplete, and you need to add another 20,000 words to finish it?

Is advertising unethical? What about using a mailing list? Do you think all marketing is ethically dubious, or just the product development and merchandizing phases?

No, please don't mistake my aversion to "bundles" as an aversion to an omnibus. I actually do have a 3-book omnibus out: The Captain of Her Heart.

I meant a 40-story bundle of shorts that fits into every category of books Amazon offers. To that, I have an aversion.
 

Offline brkingsolver

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Re: Amazon's fake book problem
« Reply #118 on: June 16, 2017, 05:28:30 PM »
The point I'm trying to make is that none of this is clearcut, and ethical arguments are difficult to sustain in this territory.
I disagree. Those with situational ethics make this argument...the situation usually having to do with what benefits them at that particular point in time. Ethics are clear cut. You decide what your ethics are, and I decide what mine are. Skating the boundaries is something an individual has to decide for themselves. But they shouldn't be surprised when there are consequences.

What I keep seeing in this thread is that people feel they can do anything they can get away with. What happens over and over again is that Amazon comes in with a sledgehammer and a chainsaw to fix a problem, and then we listen to whining for the next two years.

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Offline NeedWant

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Re: Amazon's fake book problem
« Reply #119 on: June 16, 2017, 05:47:44 PM »
I disagree. Those with situational ethics make this argument...the situation usually having to do with what benefits them at that particular point in time. Ethics are clear cut. You decide what your ethics are, and I decide what mine are. Skating the boundaries is something an individual has to decide for themselves. But they shouldn't be surprised when there are consequences.

What I keep seeing in this thread is that people feel they can do anything they can get away with. What happens over and over again is that Amazon comes in with a sledgehammer and a chainsaw to fix a problem, and then we listen to whining for the next two years.

So, according to you, writing shorts under KU1 was unethical behavior?

Offline brkingsolver

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Re: Amazon's fake book problem
« Reply #120 on: June 16, 2017, 05:53:13 PM »
So, according to you, writing shorts under KU1 was unethical behavior?
I never said that, and you're the one who brought up erotica, not me. Go back and read what I wrote. I said that breaking novels into 10 page serials to get paid when the book was opened caused Amazon to kill KU1. And that's all I said. Stop putting words in other people's mouths.

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Offline NeedWant

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Re: Amazon's fake book problem
« Reply #121 on: June 16, 2017, 05:58:59 PM »
I never said that, and you're the one who brought up erotica, not me. Go back and read what I wrote. I said that breaking novels into 10 page serials to get paid when the book was opened caused Amazon to kill KU1. And that's all I said. Stop putting words in other people's mouths.

So when I said I wrote erotica shorts during KU1 and you responded with this:

Now we come down to it. You were working the system and you're upset that the gravy train ended. Thank you for coming clean.

What did you mean by this? Sounds a lot like you were saying that I was doing something morally wrong. If not, then choose your words more carefully next time or don't address me at all.

Offline Dolphin

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Re: Amazon's fake book problem
« Reply #122 on: June 16, 2017, 06:25:35 PM »
I never said that, and you're the one who brought up erotica, not me. Go back and read what I wrote. I said that breaking novels into 10 page serials to get paid when the book was opened caused Amazon to kill KU1. And that's all I said. Stop putting words in other people's mouths.

NeedWant literally asked "So, according to you, writing shorts under KU1 was unethical behavior?" and you came back with "you're the one who brought up erotica, not me." You're the one putting words in people's mouths.

What you actually said was not that serialized novels killed KU1. What you said was, "Now we come down to it. You were working the system and you're upset that the gravy train ended. Thank you for coming clean." And you said it to someone who I believe--correct me if I'm wrong, NeedWant--wrote shorts before KU1, and has continued writing shorts after KU1.

The more I go back and read your words, the more vicious and unreasonable they seem.

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Re: Amazon's fake book problem
« Reply #123 on: June 16, 2017, 06:39:26 PM »
And you said it to someone who I believe--correct me if I'm wrong, NeedWant--wrote shorts before KU1, and has continued writing shorts after KU1.

I wrote them before and during, but stopped as soon as KU2 was announced. I'm writing novels now, which I prefer anyway.

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The more I go back and read your words, the more vicious and unreasonable they seem.

Yeah, I'm not sure what nerve I hit with BR, but when I read that "working the system/gravy train/thanks for coming clean" comment I was genuinely shocked.

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Re: Amazon's fake book problem
« Reply #124 on: June 16, 2017, 07:18:54 PM »
I wrote them before and during, but stopped as soon as KU2 was announced. I'm writing novels now, which I prefer anyway.

Yeah, that sounds like a success of the system to me. KU2 has made it easier to justify the switch to novels if you'd been earning a living from $2.99 shorts and KU1 borrows before.