Author Topic: What is a "Good" Book?  (Read 7999 times)  

Offline Dolphin

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Re: What is a "Good" Book?
« Reply #125 on: June 19, 2017, 12:06:35 PM »
I've decided it's a Law of the Internet that all conversations about writing, if they go on long enough, will bring up FSOG. It's inescapable.

There it is: Doucette's Law.

Trying to figure out what makes a good book is as pointless as trying to figure out what makes a good marriage.

Like sela said, that's only true if we're talking about taste. If we settle on objective criteria, like the commercial success of FSOG, then we're in business. And doing business. As business people. Which is what we are, at least in part.

I don't care about consensus on taste. I care about a consensus of craft techniques shared by successful works. I think those exist, and we can learn by studying them.

Offline sela

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Re: What is a "Good" Book?
« Reply #126 on: June 19, 2017, 12:10:16 PM »
Everyone loves to bash Fifty Shades of Grey. It's so easy and I suppose satisfying to those who aren't nearly as successful.

Fifty Shades was a huge success and it was organic. It became an even bigger success once it moved from a small indie publisher from Australia to a trad publisher but it was already a huge hit from word of mouth and from the fandom world of fan fiction.

It also got a lot of people reading and writing who didn't read or write. It created a whole audience for erotic romance that was much smaller than before it came out. I am a published author largely because of Fifty Shades of Grey because I figured that if a fan fiction author could make it that big, I could give it a try and if I had only 10% of James's success, I'd be able to quit my day job. Guess what? I did and I did quit my day job.

I thought the writing could have been better, but the story was compelling if you like that kind of story and the pace was brisk. It kept me turning pages until it was done and I read all three books in a week.

If you didn't like it, fine. There are a lot of books I hate that are at the top of the charts. Most books I buy are DNF. Only a few keep my interest. That's the way it is for most people.

If an author is upset that their books are not selling, trashing EL James or Fifty Shades may feel good but it won't do anything to help their books sell.

They have to write stuff that people want to read and get them visible if they want their books to sell.

Most people just can't do it. They can put one sentence after another and put enough of them together to make a novel, but the story just doesn't resonate with readers and / or the author doesn't know how to present the book and promote it so that it's visible and can sell.

That's the plain truth.

 


Offline GeneDoucette

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Re: What is a "Good" Book?
« Reply #127 on: June 19, 2017, 12:12:45 PM »
There it is: Doucette's Law.

I've always wanted my own law

Offline sela

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Re: What is a "Good" Book?
« Reply #128 on: June 19, 2017, 12:19:35 PM »
There it is: Doucette's Law.

Like sela said, that's only true if we're talking about taste. If we settle on objective criteria, like the commercial success of FSOG, then we're in business. And doing business. As business people. Which is what we are, at least in part.

I don't care about consensus on taste. I care about a consensus of craft techniques shared by successful works. I think those exist, and we can learn by studying them.

This.

Taste is subjective and the notion of "good" an "quality" fiction are also subjective and impossible to determine in any objective manner.

What isn't subjective is sales data. What is less subjective is craft techniques such as a hooky premise, compelling plot and interesting character and blistering (or fast) pace and smart marketing, such as cover design and blurb hookiness. 

Those things we can study. Those things we can try. Instead of talking about what makes a "good" book, we should talk about what makes a book a commercial success. What are the aspects that are in common among commercially successful books and authors? How can we take that knowledge and use it for our own careers?

Sure, if people want to debate what makes a book "good," there are places for that. Like Goodreads.

I'm sure there are thousands upon thousands of books with "good" writing and deep themes that are not selling at all. I don't want to write those kinds of books, frankly.

I want to write the kind that people actually want to read. :) Because I want to write books for a living. I count myself blessed to be able to do so and I have to acknowledge that Fifty Shades was a big part of me being able to do so.

Offline Laran Mithras

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Re: What is a "Good" Book?
« Reply #129 on: June 19, 2017, 12:20:02 PM »
Is that what the data is suggesting? And what is this "sizzle"? I mean specifically; what exactly were they selling? A book? An experience? Inclusion? Maybe...

The reality, to me, is that FSOG is an amazing book, even if it falls short on the literary side of things.

"Selling the Sizzle" is a hard-sales term. http://simplesmallbiz.com/business-marketing-101-sell-the-sizzle-not-the-steak/

Thing is, it works. Forget FSOG. Let's look at Justin Bieber school products (or any fad product). Fads are created. Long before Bieber became a national household word, department stores had Bieber posters, t-shirts, backpacks and hats. Parents were clueless, but this was being pushed as a fad before it was (as any other fad). "Oh, I better buy this for my kid so they fit in at school. Bieber must be really popular."

Sales pile in as people buy the sizzle so as not to be left out.

Back to FSOG. Yes, it had a tremendous fanfiction following. Good for it. But how do they translate that beyond the fanfic base? They push the "sizzle." "Have YOU read this yet? and Why not?" "Everyone is talking about it!" "What you need to know before you read FSOG." These are all powerful psychological sales tactics.

Then you trot in the testimonials. "I read it and wow!" "I finally bought this and sure wish I'd bought it earlier!" <--- I see that all the time. But who says that? Isn't the fact I bought one good enough? Books, movies, cars, furniture, doesn't matter.

Fact is FSOG was pushed. Would it have been a great mega-seller without it? It wasn't just Oprah, either. Every morning show on TV had an FSOG episode. When was the last time any book got that?

It might have been a bestseller on its own just from the fanfic buyers. But a household byword? Thing is, this strategy always works - on any product. Good for EL James that she had the backing to take advantage of it.
 

Offline Laran Mithras

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Re: What is a "Good" Book?
« Reply #130 on: June 19, 2017, 12:24:17 PM »
Everyone loves to bash Fifty Shades of Grey. It's so easy and I suppose satisfying to those who aren't nearly as successful.

If an author is upset that their books are not selling, trashing EL James or Fifty Shades may feel good but it won't do anything to help their books sell.

They have to write stuff that people want to read and get them visible if they want their books to sell.


We were talking about marketing when FSOG came up. Which is what I addressed. Not everything critical of FSOG has to be envy.  ::)

When we talk about boxed sets cramming the top lists, is it envy? Or is it discussing the shady marketing strategies that are allowed by Amazon.
 

Offline Lorri Moulton

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Re: What is a "Good" Book?
« Reply #131 on: June 19, 2017, 12:31:41 PM »
I had a similar question about a best seller, so I asked my friend.  It turned out that it wasn't the obvious things that drew her in.  It was that the heroine was not perfect...far from it.  She was flawed and it made my friend feel like this story could happen to her.  (Of course, the hero was perfect) but I found that interesting.

It doesn't change the way I approach my stories, as my main characters have a lot of good qualities, but they are never perfect.  However, it did make more sense as to why a book I didn't find at all interesting might be doing so well on the best seller's list.

Fifty Shade of Grey always seems to polarize a thread, so I didn't mention the title...but this is the book I asked my friend about to see why she liked it.  While I'm sure the other aspects were all part of the appeal, I was surprised by her response.  It makes sense, when you think about it. 

If you get past the sex/sizzle parts of the story, it's a fairytale in a lot of ways.  And that will always have an appeal!  Look at the way the series ends.  Grey changes a lot to please this unassuming girl that manages to capture a gorgeous, billionaire's heart.  Much like a young woman might end up with a charming price.  Same thing was done in Pretty Woman, too.  :)
« Last Edit: June 19, 2017, 12:37:54 PM by Lorri Moulton »

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Offline sela

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Re: What is a "Good" Book?
« Reply #132 on: June 19, 2017, 12:44:45 PM »
"Selling the Sizzle" is a hard-sales term. http://simplesmallbiz.com/business-marketing-101-sell-the-sizzle-not-the-steak/

Back to FSOG. Yes, it had a tremendous fanfiction following. Good for it. But how do they translate that beyond the fanfic base? They push the "sizzle." "Have YOU read this yet? and Why not?" "Everyone is talking about it!" "What you need to know before you read FSOG." These are all powerful psychological sales tactics.

Then you trot in the testimonials. "I read it and wow!" "I finally bought this and sure wish I'd bought it earlier!" <--- I see that all the time. But who says that? Isn't the fact I bought one good enough? Books, movies, cars, furniture, doesn't matter.

Fact is FSOG was pushed. Would it have been a great mega-seller without it? It wasn't just Oprah, either. Every morning show on TV had an FSOG episode. When was the last time any book got that?

It might have been a bestseller on its own just from the fanfic buyers. But a household byword? Thing is, this strategy always works - on any product. Good for EL James that she had the backing to take advantage of it.

I was under the assumption -- possibly wrong -- that Fifty Shades was successful BEFORE the book deal. Agents and editors and publishers usually only invest seven figures on proven successes. So Fifty Shades was already successful. So successful that Writer's Coffee Shop couldn't keep up with demand for the print book. Fifty Shades was not created out of any marketing plan by the trad pubs. They saw $$$ and then invested more $$$ to make it a $100M success vs. a $10M success.

They took it from hugely successful -- considering its origins -- to outlandishly successful.

The huge success was due to the book itself, not the marketing.

If you want to understand Fifty Shades success story, you have to look at the book itself and its audience. If you only look at the prose, you miss the whole story.

Which is the story. The pace. The hook.

But don't take my word for it. You can read the book which shows how Fifty Shades mirrors the plot of other huge bestselling blockbusters.

https://www.amazon.com/Bestseller-Code-Anatomy-Blockbuster-Novel-ebook/dp/B01B1MWKIU
« Last Edit: June 19, 2017, 12:47:34 PM by sela »

Offline Perry Constantine

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Re: What is a "Good" Book?
« Reply #133 on: June 19, 2017, 12:45:11 PM »
"Selling the Sizzle" is a hard-sales term. http://simplesmallbiz.com/business-marketing-101-sell-the-sizzle-not-the-steak/

Thing is, it works. Forget FSOG. Let's look at Justin Bieber school products (or any fad product). Fads are created. Long before Bieber became a national household word, department stores had Bieber posters, t-shirts, backpacks and hats. Parents were clueless, but this was being pushed as a fad before it was (as any other fad). "Oh, I better buy this for my kid so they fit in at school. Bieber must be really popular."

Sales pile in as people buy the sizzle so as not to be left out.

Back to FSOG. Yes, it had a tremendous fanfiction following. Good for it. But how do they translate that beyond the fanfic base? They push the "sizzle." "Have YOU read this yet? and Why not?" "Everyone is talking about it!" "What you need to know before you read FSOG." These are all powerful psychological sales tactics.

Then you trot in the testimonials. "I read it and wow!" "I finally bought this and sure wish I'd bought it earlier!" <--- I see that all the time. But who says that? Isn't the fact I bought one good enough? Books, movies, cars, furniture, doesn't matter.

Fact is FSOG was pushed. Would it have been a great mega-seller without it? It wasn't just Oprah, either. Every morning show on TV had an FSOG episode. When was the last time any book got that?

It might have been a bestseller on its own just from the fanfic buyers. But a household byword? Thing is, this strategy always works - on any product. Good for EL James that she had the backing to take advantage of it.

That pushing came after it started resonating with an audience. The morning talk shows and Oprah didn't just pick FSOG out of a hat--if they did, we'd see a lot more worldwide phenomenons with books. Nor was it engineered--no US national morning show is going to devote a segment to a book published by a small press in Australia that no one's ever heard of unless they have a reason to.

They picked up on it because it was resonating with audiences.

Pushing alone won't work. Just look at Batman v Superman. Two of the most popular and longest-running fictional characters in American history, appearing together onscreen for the first time ever, with a massive marketing campaign. And yeah, it had a strong opening weekend. But what happened that second weekend? It dropped like a rock. Because no amount of pushing could make up for the fact that it was a depressing, nihilistic film with truly awful storytelling. And once the people who saw it started talking about that with their friends, other people decided, "eh, I think I'll wait until it comes to Redbox or Netflix."

Pushing works for a limited, short-term push. But to sustain that level of popularity, you need something that will resonate with audiences and make them want to keep talking about it.

Offline sela

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Re: What is a "Good" Book?
« Reply #134 on: June 19, 2017, 12:49:54 PM »
We were talking about marketing when FSOG came up. Which is what I addressed. Not everything critical of FSOG has to be envy.  ::)

When we talk about boxed sets cramming the top lists, is it envy? Or is it discussing the shady marketing strategies that are allowed by Amazon.

Equating Fifty Shades's success to the whole boxed set scam is like comparing apples and octopi.

Offline UltraRob

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Re: What is a "Good" Book?
« Reply #135 on: June 19, 2017, 12:52:12 PM »
I wrote a blog entry about five things that readers get from good stories recently. I think it might answer your question.

The SPINE of Every Good Story.

Rob

Offline Dolphin

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Re: What is a "Good" Book?
« Reply #136 on: June 19, 2017, 12:53:00 PM »
It might have been a bestseller on its own just from the fanfic buyers. But a household byword? Thing is, this strategy always works - on any product. Good for EL James that she had the backing to take advantage of it.

But she didn't. She was a nobody with a stupid fanfic. Except it wasn't a stupid fanfic. No, it was a wildly successful fanfic that delighted readers. And then it a wildly successful, indy-published book that delighted even more readers. And then--only then--did James win the backing of Hollywood and the postmodern Madison Avenue types.

If you think marketing always works, ask around. KBoards has some stories to tell about failed ad spends. The phenomena that you're talking about, the Justin Biebers and the E.L. Jameses, are things that most people had never heard of when they were toiling in obscurity. We only saw their marketing after they had already succeeded. Arguing that marketing is always successful because it made crap like Bieber and FSOG successful is nothing but a tautology.

If you get past the sex/sizzle parts of the story, it's a fairytale in a lot of ways.  And that will always have an appeal!  Look at the way the series ends.  Grey changes a lot to please this unassuming girl that manages to capture a gorgeous, billionaire's heart.  Much like a young woman might end up with a charming price.  Same thing was done in Pretty Woman, too.  :)

Exactly! Or Austen! Or any number of others. There's lessons to be learned here.

Offline Dpock

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Re: What is a "Good" Book?
« Reply #137 on: June 19, 2017, 01:05:06 PM »
KBoards has some stories to tell about failed ad spends.


We're way off topic I guess but I watched five different romance Bookbubs fail to hit #10,000 over the past few days. I think they run $500-600 each?


Offline WHDean

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Re: What is a "Good" Book?
« Reply #138 on: June 19, 2017, 01:08:00 PM »

Taste is subjective and the notion of "good" an "quality" fiction are also subjective and impossible to determine in any objective manner.

A falsehood inferred from a glittering generality. Taste is subjective in the same way chairs are furniture. Taste is an aspect or dimension of subjectivity. So, yeah, taste is subjective and bears poop in the woods.

It doesn't follow from this that everything about chairs or books is therefore "impossible to determine in any objective manner." I take it you've noticed that there are genres of literature that demarcate relatively predictable plots, characters, outcomes, and affects? These features exist out there in the world, which is what makes them objective. And these objective features give rise to objective judgements about books: A thriller that does not thrill, for example, is not a "good" thriller. A book in any genre that no one can understand or follow is not a "quality" book.

I find it bizarre that you go on to talk about finding commonalities in books that people buy. Assuming you could identify these things (which is far from obvious), what would these commonalities be other than objective determinants of taste?  ???


Offline Dolphin

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Re: What is a "Good" Book?
« Reply #139 on: June 19, 2017, 01:21:53 PM »
We're way off topic I guess but I watched five different romance Bookbubs fail to hit #10,000 over the past few days. I think they run $500-600 each?



I find it bizarre that you go on to talk about finding commonalities in books that people buy. Assuming you could identify these things (which is far from obvious), what would these commonalities be other than objective determinants of taste?  ???

Look, I'm sympathetic to this line of reasoning, but then people come in and tell us that FSOG is wrongbadfun and not a "good" book, so how do we account for that? The word we're using is "taste," but anything that we can agree upon as having subjective connotations will do.

All I care about is what will get us to your "objective determinants of taste." I don't care what you call it. I think it exists and I've got ideas about what it includes.

Offline Lorri Moulton

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Re: What is a "Good" Book?
« Reply #140 on: June 19, 2017, 01:39:43 PM »

Exactly! Or Austen! Or any number of others. There's lessons to be learned here.

This is a basic romantic concept that has a great appeal!  The woman is so amazing that all her obvious economic/social disadvantages are overlooked because the handsome prince/aristocrat/billionaire loves her too much to go on without her.  He is willing to ignore convention because she is worth it. :)

Realistic?  Maybe not, but still makes a great story.  If you flip the idea, I think you could include Arwen giving up eternity to be with Aragorn.
« Last Edit: June 19, 2017, 01:41:49 PM by Lorri Moulton »

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Offline sela

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Re: What is a "Good" Book?
« Reply #141 on: June 19, 2017, 01:44:29 PM »
A falsehood inferred from a glittering generality. Taste is subjective in the same way chairs are furniture. Taste is an aspect or dimension of subjectivity. So, yeah, taste is subjective and bears poop in the woods.

It doesn't follow from this that everything about chairs or books is therefore "impossible to determine in any objective manner." I take it you've noticed that there are genres of literature that demarcate relatively predictable plots, characters, outcomes, and affects? These features exist out there in the world, which is what makes them objective. And these objective features give rise to objective judgements about books: A thriller that does not thrill, for example, is not a "good" thriller. A book in any genre that no one can understand or follow is not a "quality" book.

I find it bizarre that you go on to talk about finding commonalities in books that people buy. Assuming you could identify these things (which is far from obvious), what would these commonalities be other than objective determinants of taste?  ???

No, taste is subjective in the same way that a chair is/is not pretty. Chairs have objective qualities, like structure and design and fabric and materials and the skill of the fabricator. Whether one considers a particular chair "pretty'" or "ugly" is subjective and no one can tell me that my favourite chair is not pretty or comfy or favourite.

The fact that many people find my chair comfy does not mean it is a comfy chair, because others will say it sucks. Taste is subjective and no one can argue with me that my chair is NOT COMFY!!!

It is possible to come up with an objective measure of my favourite comfy chair such as size and fabric and materials and structure and design. Wood, plastic, fibreglass, wool, latex, tongue and groove, height, width, depth, etc. Those things we can all agree on because they are objective.

Comfy, pretty, and favourite are all subjective measures and we can't come to an objective measure of how comfy a chair is or how pretty or how favourite it is. What one little bear thinks is comfy, another bear will think is too hard, and yet another will be too soft. Still another bear will call it poop whether it is in the woods or not.

ETA: What we can say about pretty or comfy or favourite is that 70% of chairs people call their favourite are x, y, and z of the objective measures. Eg. the majority of chairs labeled as comfy were made with these fabrics and this design.

If we translate that to books, we might say that the most "popular" books (best selling) have x y and z in common, which might be genre-appropriate covers, certain tropes and have a basic hero's journey plot structure with cliffhanger chapter endings.

If you asked those readers, they might describe that book as their favourite, the best, a good book, a great book. But just because a book is a best seller doesn't mean it is good -- or bad. It just means it sells the best. If you want to sell the best, you should study those best sellers. They are pleasing a lot of readers. There are measures you can study that make them best sellers, but I don't think it's useful to try to determine if they are "good" since that is subjective.

« Last Edit: June 19, 2017, 01:57:06 PM by sela »

Offline #############

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Re: What is a "Good" Book?
« Reply #142 on: June 19, 2017, 01:47:32 PM »
After 140 comments, I guess the consensus to the advice of 'write a good book' is that it is useless to say to a newbie. No one yet has been able to objectively state what a good book is other than what their personal tastes are for one.

What can be said, then? 'Write the best book you can'?

Offline KBaker

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Re: What is a "Good" Book?
« Reply #143 on: June 19, 2017, 01:51:37 PM »
For me, there's good books and great books.

Good books are the ones that are commercially successful, has a unanimous agreement that it's good, and gets discussed a lot. These are typically the bestsellers, classics, or hidden gems that become popular via WOM.

Great books can also include good books, but these are the books that are personally good to you. They're the books that you rave about, reread, and shout to the universe that it's the best book ever. These aren't always well-written, popular, or thought-provoking, but they resonate with YOU the reader.

So I guess a good book can be a great book, but a great book isn't always a good book.

Offline Lorri Moulton

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Re: What is a "Good" Book?
« Reply #144 on: June 19, 2017, 01:52:01 PM »
After 140 comments, I guess the consensus to the advice of 'write a good book' is that it is useless to say to a newbie. No one yet has been able to objectively state what a good book is other than what their personal tastes are for one.

What can be said, then? 'Write the best book you can'?

Maybe write a book people will want to read?  If you are trying to sell a lot of books that is probably the goal.  If you want to write a book you enjoy writing, then whether people will want to read it is secondary.  If the goal is to be recognized as a great author, again, sales are probably secondary.

I think writers need to decide what they really want before they write their book.  Ideally, it's probably all of the above, but if you had to choose.....

That's probably your answer. :)

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Offline BWFoster78

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Re: What is a "Good" Book?
« Reply #145 on: June 19, 2017, 01:59:03 PM »
Since the consensus seems to be becoming that "What is a good book?" is an impossible question to answer, how about we modify it a little, tiny bit:

What is a good book for ... X?

If X = Everyone in Existence, I'm going to have to go with most others and say that defining such is impossible and, thus as far as advice goes, "Write a Good Book" is kinda pointless.

If X = Me, however, it's easy to define what makes a good book. I very much know what I like and mostly why I like it. If your goal then is to write a book that Brian W. Foster likes, I can answer the question easily and the advice is fantastic!

The trick, I think, is to determine the answer to the question when X = Your Target Readers. That's probably a lot harder than figuring out what you like in a book but probably a lot less impossible than figuring out what everyone likes in a book. To be completely honest, I haven't found anything about learning to write fiction and market books to be either easy or intuitively obvious. Not sure why trying to figure out what my readers want would be any less hard. The thing is, though, just because it's difficult doesn't make it unimportant.

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Offline Dpock

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Re: What is a "Good" Book?
« Reply #146 on: June 19, 2017, 02:04:40 PM »


What can be said, then? 'Write the best book you can'?

Not necessarily. It depends on whether you're writing it strictly for income or for critical acclaim. You could achieve both outcomes of course.



Offline Nic

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Re: What is a "Good" Book?
« Reply #147 on: June 19, 2017, 02:14:01 PM »
This is the point I'm making about FSOG: its a sociological thing, a tribal thing, an empowering thing that goes far beyond anything as banal as copy editing. Neither FSOG nor Peyton Place were planned - they just sort of happened - perfect storms.

FSOG empowering? To whom? This book was disempowering to people in the BDSM lifestyle to the point of painting them so mentally ill they are in need of virginal rescue.

If an author is upset that their books are not selling, trashing EL James or Fifty Shades may feel good but it won't do anything to help their books sell.

Why is everyone assuming that people who state that FSOG is unmitigated trash, have to be upset that their books aren't selling? Or are envious? Why is it so hard to grasp, that some people will point out that the emperor is indeed naked? That doesn't even detract from the financial success of FSOG or similar blockbusters, though I really have trouble thinking of one equally as horrible as that one.

I'd be cringing with shame if I ever wrote such trash. I'm really not envious of someone who did, and this is regardless of how much money James earned. I wouldn't want to be in her place for all that money. That seems hard to understand for some.

Of course there are very successful authors I'm envious of: King is one, Rowlings is another, or Neil Gaiman. Alan Hollinghurst or the late Sir Terry Pratchett. The reason why I am envious is that they write excellent books, and much less because they also earn good money. That's what comes with excellent, with good books.

Offline Shelley K

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Re: What is a "Good" Book?
« Reply #148 on: June 19, 2017, 02:18:30 PM »
The thing is, people latch onto 50 Shades like it's some unusual case. It's not. It's just the most visible one and the one that made the most money. There are many other books that a writer could look at and think that will never sell, my god that have KILLED. People can trash 50 Shades and say it's poorly written, and from an objective standpoint I can't disagree about the state of the prose, but another writer who's made a mint couldn't go two paragraphs without glaring errors. Her books were bad first drafts, her covers homemade and awful, and the characters were caricatures. She was making not-low six figures a year for a while, and I'm guessing based on sheer number of publications she still is. Don't guess, because I won't confirm. I like her and have no wish to point fingers. She's also hardly alone. So many examples.

Her readers didn't care about the errors. She was giving them the stories they wanted and couldn't get anywhere else. Good for her. I don't read her stuff, it's too unrealistic and error-filled for me, but I am clearly not her audience. The people willing to pay her are the only ones with opinions that matter.

FSOG empowering? To whom? This book was disempowering to people in the BDSM lifestyle to the point of painting them so mentally ill they are in need of virginal rescue.


It wasn't written for or by anybody actually into BDSM. Women who didn't know anything about BDSM felt empowered at the idea that a woman could "fix" a messed up guy because he wanted her that much.

I don't have to agree with it, nobody does, but that was the story that was told. Her loved saved him from his bad-dirty-wrong kink (don't get me started). That's not an uncommon fantasy in romance.
« Last Edit: June 19, 2017, 02:22:41 PM by Shelley K »

Offline Sapphire

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Re: What is a "Good" Book?
« Reply #149 on: June 19, 2017, 02:33:05 PM »
P.J. Post quoted Elmore Leonard: "If it sounds like writing, rewrite it."
In my opinion, excellent advice no matter what you write. Thank you, P.J. for sharing this.