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Taerak's Void
by M. R. Mathias

$ 3.99
Kindle Edition published 2017-07-09
Bestseller ranking: 8023

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Taerak's Void
(Book One of Fantastica)
A new series by multiple award winning author, M. R. Mathias

After finding a strange medallion and some maps with markings that no one in his village can understand, Braxton Bray decides to take it all to the Hall of Scholars in the kingdom's capital. But greed is everywhere. Braxton and a tough young female caravan guard named Nixy are forced to run for their lives, for someone else wants what Braxton found and is willing to go to great lengths to take it from him.

With a hefty, kingdom wide, bounty on their heads, not even the great wizards of the Sorcerious can help them. Left with nothing but each other, Braxton and Nixy have no choice but to get on a ship and go on an adventure that will take them places they would have otherwise never imagined. Elves, dwarves, giant gothicans, and trolls, treacherous forests on distant shores, love, death, terror, and magic all await...

Author Topic: So...about the banned book thing  (Read 12490 times)  

Offline Anarchist

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Re: So...about the banned book thing
« Reply #75 on: August 09, 2017, 09:38:13 PM »
Now that I've been able to check it out, the whole thing was an obvious marketing ploy. She's laughing all the way to the bank.

Reminds me of the Faces Of Death marketing back in the 1970s.





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The movie is often billed as Banned in 40+ Countries, but actually it has only been banned (at least temporarily) in Australia, Norway, Finland, New Zealand, and the United Kingdom.
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Offline kcmorgan

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Re: So...about the banned book thing
« Reply #76 on: August 09, 2017, 10:05:01 PM »
Yeah, good points.

This discussion is reminding me of a women's studies class I took as an undergrad. One day, the class got sort of heated while discussing rape fantasies. One side thought women should refuse to indulge in them because they normalize rape in a culturewide sense; the other side thought women should be free to enjoy them while also demanding not to be raped in real life. As I recall, neither side was able to convince the other before class ended.

I can't think of a single society where thought policing made things better for anyone. Plus, the kind of people who commit these crimes wouldn't likely be interested in these books. They usually have hatred or indifference towards their victims. In the books, the MMC is so in tune with the FMC's needs and wants, he's able to fulfill them without her even fully knowing herself.

And while that may seem patronizing, I remind you, this is an industry dominated by women. These are women imagining these men that sweep in solving all the heroine's problems and forcing her to be happy for the rest of her life. Can it really be patronizing if no patrons are involved?

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Re: So...about the banned book thing
« Reply #77 on: August 09, 2017, 10:09:14 PM »
Seriously? In romance/erotica?!

Yes, in the so-called "dark erotica" and "dark romance" sub-genres.

Could someone please PM me the title and author of that book? I'm making a guess, but would like it confirmed.

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Re: So...about the banned book thing
« Reply #78 on: August 09, 2017, 10:13:14 PM »
No. My opinion, but based on the fact that when these people do cross that line and act out their fantasy, they are found to have loads of child porn (even if it's literature, or computer generated pictures). They can't help their urges, but it's society's job to prevent them from acting upon them, and to punish them if they do.

There's an established case for this according to a couple of studies, and there are counter examples. I believe no real verdict has yet been made, mainly because at the moment child porn is so radically punished in so many countries. One thing you shouldn't forget is that if the book contains what was cited here in the thread, it definitely is illegal in many countries worldwide. No need for banning it, it already is illegal as per content. That's probably one reason why such books are banned by Amazon.

Offline AssanaBanana

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Re: So...about the banned book thing
« Reply #79 on: August 09, 2017, 10:38:32 PM »
Sexual deviants didn't put this book in Amazon's Top 100. The number one demographic for this book is middle-aged women. And not because they are sick or twisted or anything. It's because the number one demographic for all romance is middle-aged women and if you tell people something is forbidden and naughty and they can't have it, then they are going to try twice as hard to get it. She wrote a book that was 'taboo' and people enjoyed reading and she came up with a campaign that has everyone talking about it. Smart lady.

Um... I just finished reading it and I fit that demographic, lol. I write explicit paranormal romance that occasionally skirts the lines that Amazon has drawn (vague though they may be). This book definitely crosses a lot of lines, but it still manages to maintain some standards of romance. This book was NOT as horrific and shocking as others in this thread have made it out to be. One of the spoilery descriptions posted in this thread is clearly written by someone who hasn't read the book. All the sex was consensual, despite the girl being underage (17, not 16), the girl is never raped by the father (bar the statutory variety, but like I said... consensual), and there is a happy ending. The author certainly front-loaded the book with as much shock-factor content as she could, which kept ME turning the pages. If there's anything to learn from this it's a marketing lesson... But in the end I felt like the book definitely delivered a good read, especially for readers who really love to devour dark and twisted romances.

There've been FAR more shocking, unsettling books published than this one, seriously.
« Last Edit: August 09, 2017, 10:40:41 PM by AssanaBanana »

Offline K.B. Rose

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Re: So...about the banned book thing
« Reply #80 on: August 09, 2017, 10:44:22 PM »
When it comes to erotica (and romance too), no under aged and certainly no blood incest.
I think US Laws are the reason for that.

I don't know about erotica but there are tons of romance books with underage characters. I can think of three I've read in the past year that featured a 15 year old girl paired with an adult man, all taking place in present day US. And dark romance is filled with rape. With this book I have to think it was the incest or possibly a combination of all things, plus hype.

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Offline kcmorgan

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Re: So...about the banned book thing
« Reply #81 on: August 09, 2017, 10:44:39 PM »
Um... I just finished reading it and I fit that demographic, lol. I write explicit paranormal romance that occasionally skirts the lines that Amazon has drawn (vague though they may be). This book definitely crosses a lot of lines, but it still manages to maintain some standards of romance. This book was NOT as horrific and shocking as others in this thread have made it out to be. One of the spoilery descriptions posted in this thread is clearly written by someone who hasn't read the book. All the sex was consensual, despite the girl being underage (17, not 16), the girl is never raped by the father (bar the statutory variety, but like I said... consensual), and there is a happy ending. The author certainly front-loaded the book with as much shock-factor content as she could, which kept ME turning the pages. If there's anything to learn from this it's a marketing lesson... But in the end I felt like the book definitely delivered a good read, especially for readers who really love to devour dark and twisted romances.

There've been FAR more shocking, unsettling books published than this one, seriously.

Age of consent in Alaska is 16, so it's not statutory rape. That came up in another discussion that pointed out the age of consent isn't 18 everywhere.
« Last Edit: August 09, 2017, 10:46:13 PM by kcmorgan »

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Offline AssanaBanana

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Re: So...about the banned book thing
« Reply #82 on: August 09, 2017, 10:52:43 PM »
Age of consent in Alaska is 16, so it's not statutory rape. That came up in another discussion that pointed out the age of consent isn't 18 everywhere.
Ahah, I didn't know that. I bet the author did that on purpose, too... having her younger than 18 provides an even greater illusion of taboo (which this book is FULL of), without actually being illegal. It's still enough to get banned by Amazon, which doesn't surprise, nor enrage me. There's a reason I skirt around that type of content. I like getting paid and don't have the wherewithal to pull the kind of stunt this author did with her book.

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Re: So...about the banned book thing
« Reply #83 on: August 09, 2017, 10:57:27 PM »
Someone PMed me which book we're talking about. Not the one I thought it would be! It is clearly marketed at a specific crowd of readers to whom a ban by Amazon is practically a "buy me"-sticker. I agree that this was most likely a concerted marketing campaign. I've seen several of this kind over the past two years, many of which are playing on the "Amazon banned this book" thing. I'm always astonished that they manage to make any sales at all, as this ploy is so obvious. Kind of like the old horror movie dare.

I also agree with AssanaBanana that this is one of the lesser books as content goes. I've seen much, much worse and as per my latest check-in those are all still available on Amazon. The ones I thought about have eroticised rape and torture of children prior to puberty for instance, which is quite a distance from this one yet.

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Re: So...about the banned book thing
« Reply #84 on: August 09, 2017, 10:59:19 PM »
Age of consent in Alaska is 16, so it's not statutory rape. That came up in another discussion that pointed out the age of consent isn't 18 everywhere.

That doesn't exactly matter. What matters is where the retailer or publisher is located and where the buyer lives.

Offline anniejocoby

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Re: So...about the banned book thing
« Reply #85 on: August 09, 2017, 11:35:29 PM »
Okay, my curiosity is piqued. Please PM me the title of this book. Thanks!

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Offline dgcasey

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Re: So...about the banned book thing
« Reply #86 on: August 10, 2017, 12:44:33 AM »
well known that insect, nonconsensual sex

I'm not sure I've ever heard of insect, nonconsensual sex and I don't think I want to. ;)
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Offline dgcasey

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Re: So...about the banned book thing
« Reply #87 on: August 10, 2017, 01:07:32 AM »
I'm not on board with the idea that stories about things people consider deviant fuel deviant behavior, even a little. Heavy metal music doesn't cause Satanism or suicide, and pornography doesn't make people rapists. Murder mysteries don't cause homicides. The most sexually violent societies on earth are also the most sexually repressed ones, not the ones where you can buy pornography on a street corner.

I remember getting into an internet discussion a few years back about whether freely available porn influenced the sexual habits of teenagers that watched it. I was of the opinion, and still am, that a lot of our young people are getting their sex ed from the porn videos that they find all over the internet. Young guys see a women getting choked and they think this is the way it's done. They see unprotected anal sex and think, "wow, I want to do that." They see guys pull over and pick up some "stranger" on the side of the road and go have wild sex with her and they think there are millions of women just like that in the world.

I had one woman, at least I think it was a woman, light into me and tell me that porn videos do NOT influence the sexual behavior of teens. Then she proceeded to tell me she was a psych major in college and she knew what she was talking about. I think she's an idiot and if that's the kind of thing they're teaching in college nowadays, this country is seriously circling the drain.
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Re: So...about the banned book thing
« Reply #88 on: August 10, 2017, 01:20:02 AM »
I remember getting into an internet discussion a few years back about whether freely available porn influenced the sexual habits of teenagers that watched it. I was of the opinion, and still am, that a lot of our young people are getting their sex ed from the porn videos that they find all over the internet. Young guys see a women getting choked and they think this is the way it's done. They see unprotected anal sex and think, "wow, I want to do that." They see guys pull over and pick up some "stranger" on the side of the road and go have wild sex with her and they think there are millions of women just like that in the world.

It is pretty obvious that porn does. At least if you go by the dozen or so cases of boys between 10 and 18 who've been convicted of raping other minors in the UK after watching porn and deciding to "try this out". A lot of sexual practices demanded nowadays were very uncommon just a decade or two ago. The question is how comparatively influential written fiction instead of visual material is.

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Re: So...about the banned book thing
« Reply #89 on: August 10, 2017, 01:24:47 AM »
The age of consent is 16 in the UK. I assumed it was the same everywhere until I got some serious horror from American parents when my high school (age 17) romance had a scene that hinted they had "done it".  In the end I had to remove it.  It's certainly normal in England to be sexually active at 16 +, but apparently totally unacceptable in the US.

However, while sex at 17 may be completely legal in the setting of this book, incest is illegal everywhere, right? So it is still glamorising illegal (and frankly sick) behaviour.

I'm still shocked by what short memories people have. Was I the only one around during the early days of KU? The store was literally flooded with tons of "Do Me Daddy" types of erotica. Most of it targeted to women readers. And not just Amazon quite a few of the retailers were carrying it. Those readers didn't just suddenly vanish. And Amazon works really hard to suppress that sort of material. I'm not a particular fan of this particular brand of erotica. But I see the appeal of selfish, abusive "daddy" type. Its a kink quite a few people have. They imagine themselves as being subservient. It what tickles their fancy. And yeah that writer knew the ban was coming. IMHO it will drive Private sales plus paperback sales. Amazon typically ignores the Create space version of banned books.

That's different. I remember that glut well, but nearly all those books were about step-fathers (and step brothers) and all the girls were supposed to be 18. (Though I am sure there were one or two that did cross the line but Amazon was pretty hot on stamping it out when it happened).

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Re: So...about the banned book thing
« Reply #90 on: August 10, 2017, 01:40:50 AM »
The age of consent is 16 in the UK. I assumed it was the same everywhere until I got some serious horror from American parents when my high school (age 17) romance had a scene that hinted they had "done it".  In the end I had to remove it.  It's certainly normal in England to be sexually active at 16 +, but apparently totally unacceptable in the US.

There are quite a few romances around with characters younger than 18 having sex, usually between 16 and 18. A few historical romances with spouses aged 14 and 15, where you as of necessity know that the couple has sex before she or he is 18. It's also not that rare in romantic YA. I think a lot depends on how it is done.

Quote
However, while sex at 17 may be completely legal in the setting of this book, incest is illegal everywhere, right? So it is still glamorising illegal (and frankly sick) behaviour.

No, incest is not illegal everywhere. Quite a few countries have no laws against it if both parties are officially adult when they first have sex.

Interestingly it appears as if this book has now also been banned on Smashwords.

Offline kcmorgan

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Re: So...about the banned book thing
« Reply #91 on: August 10, 2017, 02:05:07 AM »
The age of consent is 16 in the UK. I assumed it was the same everywhere until I got some serious horror from American parents when my high school (age 17) romance had a scene that hinted they had "done it".  In the end I had to remove it.  It's certainly normal in England to be sexually active at 16 +, but apparently totally unacceptable in the US.

However, while sex at 17 may be completely legal in the setting of this book, incest is illegal everywhere, right? So it is still glamorising illegal (and frankly sick) behaviour.

That's different. I remember that glut well, but nearly all those books were about step-fathers (and step brothers) and all the girls were supposed to be 18. (Though I am sure there were one or two that did cross the line but Amazon was pretty hot on stamping it out when it happened).

The man in the story also wasn't her biological father. She was adopted.

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Offline kcmorgan

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Re: So...about the banned book thing
« Reply #92 on: August 10, 2017, 02:06:45 AM »
Interestingly it appears as if this book has now also been banned on Smashwords.
Yeah, and it's not easy to get a book banned on Smashwords.

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Offline BellaJames

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Re: So...about the banned book thing
« Reply #93 on: August 10, 2017, 03:05:55 AM »
It's easy to find out more information or the identity of this book and author with a simple search. I found it in 2 minutes by searching for banned erotica book on facebook. There are authors talking about it or promoting it on Facebook. It has very mixed reviews on Goodreads.

There are a bunch of authors who are into writing books that glorify sexual abuse or underage sex and in my opinion they are out to shock shock shock. That's it. A lot of these books have no plot, it is just a series of graphic sex scenes with very detailed descriptions.

I think there were a few authors after FSOG became huge, who wanted to take it further and make it darker. It is all for shock value.

If it wasn't for shock value, these books would delve deeper into the emotional, mental and psychological condition of this underage or barely legal girl and this man.

There is a small group of authors who seem proud to say that they have been banned from Amazon on their Goodreads or facebook/twitter profiles because then readers are more curious about their books.
Their book will be available somewhere else like Smashwords (this particular book has been removed now) or B&N.

There is something going on on B&N today, some authors are seeing some of their books disappearing. It could be another erotica ban coming or there is a technical glitch.
« Last Edit: August 10, 2017, 04:11:27 AM by BellaJames »

Offline brkingsolver

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Re: So...about the banned book thing
« Reply #94 on: August 10, 2017, 03:32:08 AM »
It's not the underage sex that bothers me (as a reader) about such books. It's the violence. Let's not confuse rape and sex. Anything that involves violence toward women who accept or welcome the violence turns my stomach.

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Offline Dhewco

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Re: So...about the banned book thing
« Reply #95 on: August 10, 2017, 04:33:58 AM »
I thought statutory rape also took into account the power of the individual over the younger person and that it wasn't all about age. As an adoptive power, the father would have all kinds  of power over the young woman (girl). (this is also why teacher/student relationships are considered taboo...even when the age isn't part of the equation)
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Offline she-la-ti-da

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Re: So...about the banned book thing
« Reply #96 on: August 10, 2017, 04:42:16 AM »
Quote
it is speech and I think it has to be protected

But, it is protected. As is Amazon's (or any other store's) right to not sell it. I don't see what everyone can't get about that. The government has not revived the obscenity laws and gone after the book. Amazon has simply enforced their TOS, which says sex with minors is not allowed, at least in romance and erotica. Are there books that have slipped through? I'm sure there are. Some people manage to get past every filter. They usually get caught at some point.

Age of consent in the real world doesn't matter (I think it's fifteen here in NC, but I haven't checked). Even if this were a real world case, the man is beyond the age where he is legally able to have sex with a person under age 18. He'd be prosecuted in most states, at least, and I believe all of them. A person under the age of consent can't legally agree to a sexual relationship with an adult. Remember all the teacher/student cases?

What matters is that Amazon says:  no sex with minors (outside of YA books, where both parties are of a similar age). This book was written to sexually excite people by the details of the relationship. Personally, I don't care what turns people on. They can like what they want, within the boundaries of the law. But Amazon has said more than once that they won't allow this, the author makes her bank on doing it anyway, she got burned. It's not the first time, from what I've read. She's a serial offender.

When the next pornocalypse comes, you can look at her and writers like her who, despite all legal rights to free speech, continue to push the boundaries of what a retail store has said it will not allow. I have no pity for her at all. I hope she can sell it on her site, because it looks like no one else is going to have it.
« Last Edit: August 10, 2017, 04:44:39 AM by she-la-ti-da »
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Offline alawston

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Re: So...about the banned book thing
« Reply #97 on: August 10, 2017, 04:49:00 AM »
I'm currently dealing with a (pen name, and non-erotica) book of mine that's been delisted, despite the fact that I've emailed Amazon saying "it's exactly like these five other books that you've been selling for years, in some cases". The bottom line is someone reported my book (and I know this, because they left a one-star review saying they would), and obviously isn't aware of, and so didn't report, the others. I've made my case, and Amazon's reps seem to think my title will be restored, but it's been several days now, and the 30 day cliff approaches. Could have done without it.

So, bit of venting there, but basically it's often a question of what gets reported, rather than what's actually breaking rules. I am, I'm fairly sure, not breaking rules, but if a customer complains about a book, Amazon steps in a lot quicker than we sometimes give them credit for.


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Re: So...about the banned book thing
« Reply #98 on: August 10, 2017, 05:03:50 AM »
When the next pornocalypse comes, you can look at her and writers like her who, despite all legal rights to free speech, continue to push the boundaries of what a retail store has said it will not allow. I have no pity for her at all. I hope she can sell it on her site, because it looks like no one else is going to have it.

If those who complained to Amazon and Smashwords also complain to her webhost, she won't be able to do it there either. These days anything which even vaguely smacks of child porn gets shot first and asked about but afterwards. Every single service provider I know of has a TOS banning child porn of any kind, even your common ISP or the backbone the ISP is using will have such a TOS.


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Re: So...about the banned book thing
« Reply #99 on: August 10, 2017, 06:48:37 AM »
This author, many of her fans and some very successful book bloggers see nothing wrong with the subject matter in this book.

Someone argued (not on her facebook) that these things do happen in real life but behind closed doors.

So do stories like this need to be told? If it was more about how this sensitive situation and relationship affected both of them, how they coped mentally and emotionally it would be a better story. It would work even better if it was told from both points of view years later and how they dealt with it internally and if the relationship continued, how other people treated them. How did this grown man deal with the internal battle going on. He must have known what he was doing was wrong, so that needs to be addressed. What scars remain.


 However looking at the authors other books, she likes to push buttons, although she does have some lighter romance books.

I just really dislike the way these authors are using sensitive and controversial subjects in these erom's or erotic novels. The step-dad stories are going into darker waters. They went from innocent virgin flirting and messing with her step-dad's to being ganged on by his friends, menages with her step-bro & step-dad and now to an underage girl who is forced. There are even more disturbing ones on B&N and Smashwords featuring whole family members and animals.

I don't think these things should be used as entertainment.

« Last Edit: August 10, 2017, 06:57:45 AM by BellaJames »