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Stone and Silt
by Harvey Chute

$2.99
Kindle Edition published 2013-08-14
Bestseller ranking: 713665

Product Description
Big Al's Books & Pals 2014 Readers' Choice Awards: Young Adult Nominee

A ruthless murder and a stolen shipment of gold.

At school, sixteen-year-old Nikaia Wales endures the taunts of bullies who call her a “half-breed.” At home, she worries about how her family will react if she reveals her growing feelings for the quiet boy next door.

Those are soon the least of her troubles. Nikaia discovers a hidden cache of gold, and when police find a corpse nearby, her father becomes a suspect. Worse, Elias Doyle is circling, hungry to avenge his brother’s death.

Nikaia desperately searches for clues to save her father. In her quest to find the killer, she learns about the power of family, friendship, and young love....

Author Topic: For heaven's sake, people, you're authors.  (Read 13648 times)  

Offline Dpock

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Re: For heaven's sake, people, you're authors.
« Reply #125 on: November 05, 2017, 12:43:45 PM »
"I personally" or "IMHO, I..."

We know it's your opinion. No need to clarify.


Online Rosie A.

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Re: For heaven's sake, people, you're authors.
« Reply #126 on: November 05, 2017, 12:45:44 PM »
Their. There. They're. <---My major pet peeves when an author misuses those. Not saying I'm perfect but good grief, those are basic.

Online Rosie A.

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Re: For heaven's sake, people, you're authors.
« Reply #127 on: November 05, 2017, 12:47:10 PM »
I'm dyslexic. The OP's first example "Yay or yae" threw me for a loop. It took me so long to figure it out, I think I'm skipping this thread.
My husband is dyslexic and says that sometimes he reads sentences backwards to better understand them.

Online C. Gold

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Re: For heaven's sake, people, you're authors.
« Reply #128 on: November 05, 2017, 01:10:09 PM »
A good friend of mine always says he wants to borrow me a copy of his story instead of lend.

Offline A.A

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Re: For heaven's sake, people, you're authors.
« Reply #129 on: November 05, 2017, 02:23:32 PM »
The word is tuition; not intuition.

Ha!! :D I read that wayyy too fast, looking for grammar mistakes and not spelling.

Offline she-la-ti-da

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Re: For heaven's sake, people, you're authors.
« Reply #130 on: November 05, 2017, 02:44:43 PM »
Bare with me. I'd love too - wait - let me get naked ...  :P

Sorry, wrong team. But appreciate the thought! :D

Needed whatever isn't a Southern thing that I'm aware of. I do know someone from West Virginia who says it, but that's not the South.

People say "Person and I" when they're trying to sound educated.

Some more for me:

Per say instead of per se.

Sells instead of sales.

My kindle instead of my book.

Weary instead of wary, and vice versa.

Hord instead of horde (or hoard, I've seen both).

He was sat on the stool, instead of he sat on the stool. I went through a period a while back where every single book had that.

Shined instead of shone. Again, a period where every single book I read had this. Either folks had the same editor, or the same cheap ghostwriter.

Lay/laid/lie get me. I'll usually rewrite the sentence so I don't have to say that. And I'm sure I've done fewer instead of less, and loan instead of lend, but again, hopefully not in a book (and lets' not get started on whether I should say "hopefully").

Apostrophe misuse is probably my biggest pet peeve. I see it everywhere. Even my own mother does it. She was once filling out a card (like, after a charity donation, for the store to put on the wall), and she used an apostrophe when writing our last name. I looked at it and blurted out:  "Mama, it's plural, not possessive!" An older gentleman behind us gave me an approving look. For knowing the difference, not embarrassing my mother, one hopes.

I admit to being less than perfect, but I do try to write sensibly, and I'm not ashamed to look stuff up if it doesn't "feel" right.

Man, I've been copy/pasting this from page to page, and of course remembered something else. It's not about using wrong words, but punctuation again:  When people are typing and leave a space before the punctuation, and often not one after. And I see a lot of people put the money signs after the amount, like 100$, instead of $100. And what's up with the random capitalization?
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Offline Jackie@519

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Re: For heaven's sake, people, you're authors.
« Reply #131 on: November 05, 2017, 02:55:33 PM »
"less" when it should be "fewer"

I see that one SO much. I'm pretty sure 98% of the English speaking population doesn't even realize there's a difference or that the word "fewer" exists.

This is the one that gets me, and I think what really bothers me is that people who are otherwise smart are doing it now, including several smart people on here.

"I received less candy than Mary." <--- Correct

"I received less pieces of candy than Mary." <--- Incorrect

"I received fewer pieces of candy than Mary." <--- Correct

More on-topic for this board:

"My latest Facebook campaign was less successful than prior campaigns." <--- Correct

"I received less likes and shares on my latest Facebook campaign than in prior campaigns." <--- Incorrect

"I received fewer likes and shares on my latest Facebook campaign than in prior campaigns." <--- Correct

The misuse has become so widespread lately that I feel like I'm living through the death of this particular rule.

Online brkingsolver

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Re: For heaven's sake, people, you're authors.
« Reply #132 on: November 05, 2017, 02:58:38 PM »
Quote
He was sat on the stool, instead of he sat on the stool.

I saw this construction repeatedly in a manuscript I was beta reading. The author told me it's common in England.

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Online Paranormal Kitty

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Re: For heaven's sake, people, you're authors.
« Reply #133 on: November 05, 2017, 03:01:51 PM »
Needed whatever isn't a Southern thing that I'm aware of. I do know someone from West Virginia who says it, but that's not the South.

I wish I could figure out the deal with it, because I seriously thought my editor was [messing] with me when she kept flagging it. Now I'm conscious about it every time I say it or hear someone say it. And I noticed a sign today that said, "Does your car need detailed?" Lol.



<edited -- let's choose words that aren't picked just to get around our forum filters, eh?>
« Last Edit: November 05, 2017, 03:05:29 PM by Ann in Arlington »

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Re: For heaven's sake, people, you're authors.
« Reply #134 on: November 05, 2017, 03:15:03 PM »
I saw this construction repeatedly in a manuscript I was beta reading. The author told me it's common in England.

It may be common, but it's annoying. One of my pet peeves - he was sat on the chair rather than sat on the chair. He was sitting on the chair, that one's fine :)


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Online brkingsolver

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Re: For heaven's sake, people, you're authors.
« Reply #135 on: November 05, 2017, 03:29:31 PM »
It may be common, but it's annoying. One of my pet peeves - he was sat on the chair rather than sat on the chair. He was sitting on the chair, that one's fine :)
Is it considered correct?

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Re: For heaven's sake, people, you're authors.
« Reply #136 on: November 05, 2017, 03:32:50 PM »
We really need to find a good escape goat to pin all this on...

Offline The Bass Bagwhan

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Re: For heaven's sake, people, you're authors.
« Reply #137 on: November 05, 2017, 03:32:54 PM »
My pet peeve is redundant information.

She nodded her head.

She crossed her arms over her chest.

He stood on the edge of the cliff and looked down below.

He kicked him with his foot.

There's a million of 'em...
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Offline crebel

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Re: For heaven's sake, people, you're authors.
« Reply #138 on: November 05, 2017, 03:38:44 PM »
My pet peeve is redundant information.

She nodded her head.

She crossed her arms over her chest.

He stood on the edge of the cliff and looked down below.

He kicked him with his foot.

There's a million of 'em...

Yes!  The frequent use of "back behind" makes me twitch.
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And, best of all, the golden door always stands ajar. - Adelaide Love

Offline Colin

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Re: For heaven's sake, people, you're authors.
« Reply #139 on: November 05, 2017, 03:41:02 PM »
We really need to find a good escape goat to pin all this on...
Blame the nanny state.

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Re: For heaven's sake, people, you're authors.
« Reply #140 on: November 05, 2017, 03:47:39 PM »
For all intensive purposes.  :-X

This is hilarious and reminds me of a scene in one of my husband's books (The Fiasco is all kinds of weird/zany but this makes me laugh every time).

Quote
"Overall, not bad for a first time. But next time, you should correct him. It's 'for all intents and purposes.'" He said each word with a crisp click. It was hard to picture him as a schoolteacher, but Ted pulled off the image well.
"It isn't 'intensive purposes'?" I asked.
The interviewee had said "intensive purposes" at least three times. Never mind that Ted wanted me to correct a vagabond who had been waxing on about the best places to sleep at night.
"No. Don't be ridiculous. 'Intensive purposes' makes no sense. Very powerful reasons didn't match the rest of his drivel. Didn't school teach you anything?" Ted shook his head.
« Last Edit: November 05, 2017, 03:50:02 PM by FelissaEly »


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Offline Jena H

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Re: For heaven's sake, people, you're authors.
« Reply #141 on: November 05, 2017, 03:54:13 PM »
That's a whole nother story.



Yeah, about that...  nother isn't an actual word.  Just say "it's a whole different story."
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Online brkingsolver

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Re: For heaven's sake, people, you're authors.
« Reply #142 on: November 05, 2017, 03:54:29 PM »
Intense porpoises? I always thought they were rather fun loving.

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Online Rosie A.

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Re: For heaven's sake, people, you're authors.
« Reply #143 on: November 05, 2017, 04:03:06 PM »
Intense porpoises? I always thought they were rather fun loving.
They're known to kill their young.

A while and awhile is a weak point for me. Just when I thought I had them down, my editor changed them. I, of course, felt like a total fool. It's a tricky one for me.

Someone up thread mentioned phase and faze. Rawr!! Phase is a cycle. Like a phase in someone's life. Faze is to disturb.  ::)

Offline Philip Gibson

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Re: For heaven's sake, people, you're authors.
« Reply #144 on: November 05, 2017, 04:15:31 PM »
On TV, I keep hearing phrases like:

"He is one of the only foreign reporters in Somalia... "

It always jars me, but I'm not sure why.  Is it correct/does it make sense, or not?

Philip
« Last Edit: November 05, 2017, 04:34:22 PM by Philip Gibson »

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Offline The Bass Bagwhan

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Re: For heaven's sake, people, you're authors.
« Reply #145 on: November 05, 2017, 04:38:25 PM »
Intense porpoises? I always thought they were rather fun loving.


There's a very popular camping area in Western Australia where you can camp, stay in caravans - and more to the point wade in waist-deep water with the local dolphin population.

The cook at the caravan park, calling everyone that meals are ready, is reputed to announce, "To all in tents and porpoises, dinner is served".

But I haven't heard it myself.
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Offline The Bass Bagwhan

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Re: For heaven's sake, people, you're authors.
« Reply #146 on: November 05, 2017, 04:41:14 PM »
On TV, I keep hearing phrases like:

"He is one of the only foreign reporters in Somalia... "

It always jars me, but I'm not sure why.  Is it correct/does it make sense, or not?

Philip

As against "local reporters", yes. Is that what you're asking? It can be a something of a coup for a foreign reporter to be allowed in certain situations and suggests an objective point of view.
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Offline Linn

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Re: For heaven's sake, people, you're authors.
« Reply #147 on: November 05, 2017, 05:15:01 PM »
Apostrophe abuse. It's  E V E R Y W H E R E. *cries*

Beware the zombie apostrophe!  :o

Bit of a spoiler here - Bruce Wayne and Batman are "one and the same," not "one in the same." Surprising how often I see the latter.


Offline SerenityEditing

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Re: For heaven's sake, people, you're authors.
« Reply #148 on: November 05, 2017, 05:18:56 PM »
Ha!! :D I read that wayyy too fast, looking for grammar mistakes and not spelling.

I'd venture to say it's still technically correct. I've never experienced someone else's intuition; it's always been my own private intuition.

I use several phrases in speech but not in writing.
"Whole 'nother story."
"Heads up" (I gave him a heads-up? a head's-up? a heads up? a heads' up?
"A hold" in the sense of "I'll get [a hold] of you later," when it's not a circumstance where someone can literally take hold of you. I've seen "get hold," "get a hold," and "get ahold," and arguments for each one, and they all rub me the wrong way in text.

Some words have more than one accepted meaning/spelling - I've seen several in this thread that either have changed or are in the process of changing. For instance, I regularly see people complain about 'nauseous' meaning only 'causing nausea' and not 'feeling nauseated,' but both meanings have been standard for quite some time (see also 'decimate'). I usually advise the 'proper' or more traditional use, but don't fuss if someone declines it.

('Nauseous' in particular interests me - its original meaning (1600s) was an adjective akin to a character trait. If you generally had a weak stomach and could be easily made to gag, you were described as nauseous, even if you were not at that moment feeling sick to your stomach. Within a few decades, though, it was an adjective used to describe something that causes the feeling of nausea - which I guess also makes sense, because I always get a bit queasy when I look at someone else who's clearly about to barf.)

And I can't help but giggle when Muphry's Law strikes, and someone makes the precise error they claim is so simple to avoid. I'm always so happy to see it happen to someone else - at least I'm not the only one!

I'm always trying to simplify phrases like what The Bass Bagwhan mentions. "She crossed one leg over the other." Is there any other way to cross one's legs? "He had a big smile on his face." I tend to let those slide because the phrase seems incomplete with just "He had a big smile," but I always get a flash of the Mr. Motley character from China Mieville's Perdido Street Station, with mouths all over his body. "He nodded his head up and down/she shook her head back and forth." And a friend argued earnestly that it's possible to "shoulder someone aside" with, for instance, your knee or elbow.

One of my favorites wasn't in print, but came up during a conversation. Someone said he was going to do something "no bars held."
It took me a second, and I said, "You mean 'no holds barred'?"
"No," he said, "no bars held. Like, going all in."
"Yeah. That's 'no holds barred.'"
"No, it isn't. That doesn't even make any sense."
"Can you explain 'no bars held' for me? Because that one doesn't make any sense to me."
"Well, yeah. Like if you're a prisoner, you know, you're behind bars, and you know how they stand there holding on to the bars?" He mimed someone gripping prison bars at face height. "So, you're limited in what you can do - you can't just do whatever you want, you can only do what they allow you to do. But I'm not holding on to any bars - I'm free to do whatever I want."
Then I explained the concept of wrestling holds and which ones might be barred/banned in a match, but nope - that was clearly ridiculous and wasn't the phrase he wanted to use at all.  ::)

And the worst part is, the logic was just sound enough that now I can't use the phrase myself without having to think two or three times about which one is right!
« Last Edit: November 05, 2017, 05:28:45 PM by SerenityEditing »
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Offline Linn

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Re: For heaven's sake, people, you're authors.
« Reply #149 on: November 05, 2017, 05:36:25 PM »

Then I explained the concept of wrestling holds and which ones might be barred/banned in a match,

That's good to know. I always thought that saying had something to do with ships and cargo.  :)