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Stone and Silt
by Harvey Chute

$2.99
Kindle Edition published 2013-08-14
Bestseller ranking: 713665

Product Description
Big Al's Books & Pals 2014 Readers' Choice Awards: Young Adult Nominee

A ruthless murder and a stolen shipment of gold.

At school, sixteen-year-old Nikaia Wales endures the taunts of bullies who call her a “half-breed.” At home, she worries about how her family will react if she reveals her growing feelings for the quiet boy next door.

Those are soon the least of her troubles. Nikaia discovers a hidden cache of gold, and when police find a corpse nearby, her father becomes a suspect. Worse, Elias Doyle is circling, hungry to avenge his brother’s death.

Nikaia desperately searches for clues to save her father. In her quest to find the killer, she learns about the power of family, friendship, and young love....

Author Topic: For heaven's sake, people, you're authors.  (Read 12055 times)  

Offline Doglover

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Re: For heaven's sake, people, you're authors.
« Reply #50 on: November 05, 2017, 05:56:49 AM »
I've had one copy editor correct my "dived" to "dove" for 2 or 3 novels and when I had to use a different one she altered all my "dove" verbs to "dived."

Apparently "dove" is more commonly used in northern quarter of the United States with "dived" preferred almost everywhere else, and internationally. Both are technically correct but I prefer "dived." I haven't gone back to change everything previously, though. I may do one day.
I think the upper classes of the English, like the royal family and the aristocracy, would use dove. Us common folk would use dived.


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Offline My Dog's Servant

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Re: For heaven's sake, people, you're authors.
« Reply #51 on: November 05, 2017, 05:57:49 AM »
Wouldn't that count as a dialect issue? I tend to write characters who ride bikes in a different manner. They rarely get off their bicycles. Instead, they're hurled across their handlebars at breakneck speed and sometimes at risk of breaking their neck.

Who is hurling them across their handlebars? Or are they simply bad riders who pedaled madly into a tree?

Offline LilyBLily

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Re: For heaven's sake, people, you're authors.
« Reply #52 on: November 05, 2017, 05:59:41 AM »
"Now I lay me down to sleep" is correct but ixnay on almost every other instance of "lay" you may see. This one gets me the most.

taunt for taut
leary for leery
flaunt for flout
phased for fazed
anyways for anyway

Which is why I don't edit fiction anymore.

Offline My Dog's Servant

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Re: For heaven's sake, people, you're authors.
« Reply #53 on: November 05, 2017, 06:00:25 AM »
Miniscule.  Is that as opposed to a maxiscule?

Putting someone through the "ringer". Really? Would that be your local church bell tower?




Offline ellenoc

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Re: For heaven's sake, people, you're authors.
« Reply #54 on: November 05, 2017, 06:01:51 AM »
And for crying out loud, learn how to use an apostrophe.

And when not to use one. If you refer to Mr. Smith's entire family, the plural of one Smith is Smiths (not Smith's).

Yes, but it sorta goes both ways in the US depending on where you're at. It's like how "leapt" sounds normal, but "leaped" isn't something you'd never hear. "He dove in after his cell phone" sounds normal to me, but so is "Yesterday, when he dived in after his phone, he forgot his Kindle was in his back pocket."

Probably because I'm old, avoidance of irregular past tense sounds awkward, ugly, and usually wrong to me. More and more I see "the sun shined," and I'm waiting for "Jesus weeped."

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Re: For heaven's sake, people, you're authors.
« Reply #55 on: November 05, 2017, 06:03:02 AM »
Putting someone through the "ringer". Really? Would that be your local church bell tower?

That's actually a very common idiom where I live. At least with the older generation.

Offline Doglover

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Re: For heaven's sake, people, you're authors.
« Reply #56 on: November 05, 2017, 06:04:09 AM »
Miniscule.  Is that as opposed to a maxiscule?

Putting someone through the "ringer". Really? Would that be your local church bell tower?




A ringer is an old fashioned machine for squeezing the surplus water out of washing. My mum used to use one; it was a big thing with wooden rollers and a handle. In other words, putting someone through the ringer means to squeeze them dry.


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Offline Doglover

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Re: For heaven's sake, people, you're authors.
« Reply #57 on: November 05, 2017, 06:06:26 AM »
The apostrophe one really does pee me off. And I find it so easy. If it is not to replace a missing letter, if it is not belong to, it doesn't belong there.


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Offline My Dog's Servant

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Re: For heaven's sake, people, you're authors.
« Reply #58 on: November 05, 2017, 06:10:16 AM »
A ringer is an old fashioned machine for squeezing the surplus water out of washing. My mum used to use one; it was a big thing with wooden rollers and a handle. In other words, putting someone through the ringer means to squeeze them dry.

No, it's a wringer.  A wringer washer.  As in "wring" or twist.  Which is why you put someone through the wringer, not the ringer.

I had to use one years ago when I spent a summer working on a dude ranch. It was a big BIG step forward from a washboard and a bucket, but oh, my! what a lot of work! And dangerous, too. 
« Last Edit: November 05, 2017, 06:15:34 AM by My Dog's Servant »

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Re: For heaven's sake, people, you're authors.
« Reply #59 on: November 05, 2017, 06:10:49 AM »
A ringer is an old fashioned machine for squeezing the surplus water out of washing. My mum used to use one; it was a big thing with wooden rollers and a handle. In other words, putting someone through the ringer means to squeeze them dry.

It is a "wringer", not a ringer. It wrings the water from the clothes.
A book, I think, is very like a little golden door.
That takes me into places where I've never been before.
It leads me into fairyland or countries strange and far.
And, best of all, the golden door always stands ajar. - Adelaide Love

Online Jena H

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Re: For heaven's sake, people, you're authors.
« Reply #60 on: November 05, 2017, 06:11:54 AM »
That's actually a very common idiom where I live. At least with the older generation.

I think the correct term is "through the wringer."  As in, to wring something out by squeezing/twisting.

A ringer is an old fashioned machine for squeezing the surplus water out of washing. My mum used to use one; it was a big thing with wooden rollers and a handle. In other words, putting someone through the ringer means to squeeze them dry.

See above.  Wringer instead of ringer.


As for quite/quiet, etc., I would like to think that something like that is just a simple typo.  Typos are NOT the same thing as incorrect word usage.


"for all intensive purposes" ....    Yeah, that one bothers me.  Probably surprising (in a bad way) that a lot of people actually think bast@rdizations like that are correct.
Jena

Offline Doglover

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Re: For heaven's sake, people, you're authors.
« Reply #61 on: November 05, 2017, 06:12:14 AM »
No, it's a wringer.  A wringer washer.  as in "wring" or twist.
Of course it is! I knew that. I'm 70 next month you know. :)


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Offline Abderian

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Re: For heaven's sake, people, you're authors.
« Reply #62 on: November 05, 2017, 06:12:20 AM »
A ringer is an old fashioned machine for squeezing the surplus water out of washing. My mum used to use one; it was a big thing with wooden rollers and a handle. In other words, putting someone through the ringer means to squeeze them dry.

That would be a wringer.

Offline Abderian

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Re: For heaven's sake, people, you're authors.
« Reply #63 on: November 05, 2017, 06:13:45 AM »
Horde/hoard can be tricky, and loathe and loath to, which is a different word.

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Re: For heaven's sake, people, you're authors.
« Reply #64 on: November 05, 2017, 06:18:20 AM »
When I hear "through the ringer" I always imagine a boxing match against an opponent much stronger and the bell going "ding ding!" between rounds.

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Re: For heaven's sake, people, you're authors.
« Reply #65 on: November 05, 2017, 06:19:25 AM »
Your going to have to bare with me, it takes alot of thought to remember all the wons that irritate me. There out their, but I'm not to good at recalling all of them. My brain is lose, and stuff falls out. But this thread has peeked my interest so I'm going too try too remember more.

You kneed an editer!

Offline Doglover

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Re: For heaven's sake, people, you're authors.
« Reply #66 on: November 05, 2017, 06:19:36 AM »
That would be a wringer.
Been there, done that, bought the t-shirt; don't rub it in.


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Re: For heaven's sake, people, you're authors.
« Reply #67 on: November 05, 2017, 06:21:12 AM »
No, it's a wringer.  A wringer washer.  As in "wring" or twist.  Which is why you put someone through the wringer, not the ringer.

Given what this thread is about, the w/ringer should have been obvious. @Doglover, I'm very glad I wasn't the only one.  ;D

Let me just add, I've actually seen an old wringer in action, and I'm incredibly thankful that isn't part of today's laundry tasks.  :o

Offline Doglover

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Re: For heaven's sake, people, you're authors.
« Reply #68 on: November 05, 2017, 06:23:44 AM »
I recently read a book set in England by an American who seemed to think our counties were similar to US states; that was very irritating. It also annoys me when a writer sets a book in England, but assumes the laws here are the same. They are not.


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Offline Shalini Boland

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Re: For heaven's sake, people, you're authors.
« Reply #69 on: November 05, 2017, 06:24:47 AM »
dragged not drug !!

This thread reminds me of an IT Crowd episode - 'pedalstool', 'damp squid' and 'm'love'  :)

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Offline Sue Ann C.

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Re: For heaven's sake, people, you're authors.
« Reply #70 on: November 05, 2017, 06:25:56 AM »
A common error, even in newspapers and on TV: John Jones hung himself. No, John Jones hanged himself.

People are hanged, clothes are hung. (I'm not sure about animals though.)

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Offline Doglover

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Re: For heaven's sake, people, you're authors.
« Reply #71 on: November 05, 2017, 06:26:18 AM »
Given what this thread is about, the w/ringer should have been obvious. @Doglover, I'm very glad I wasn't the only one.  ;D

Let me just add, I've actually seen an old wringer in action, and I'm incredibly thankful that isn't part of today's laundry tasks.  :o
The fact that I remember my mother using one on a regular basis, along with the scrubbing board, gives me an excuse for getting it wrong! Nowadays, people use them as garden ornaments.


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Offline My Dog's Servant

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Re: For heaven's sake, people, you're authors.
« Reply #72 on: November 05, 2017, 06:27:16 AM »
The really tricky ones are those you "think" you know, but don't, so you never bother checking.

Years ago I was flipping through my dictionary (look up one word, spend half an hour seeing what else you can find), and was startled to learn that "tandem" did not mean "two side-by-side" as I'd always thought, but, rather, one behind the other. Which means those twenty-mule teams that hauled borax out of the Mojave dessert in the late 1800s were tandem hitches. (I probably should have figured that out from "tandem bicycle", but I didn't.)

I sometimes wonder what I'm NOT learning by looking up words on the computer rather than "wasting" time getting lost in the dictionary.

Offline Doglover

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Re: For heaven's sake, people, you're authors.
« Reply #73 on: November 05, 2017, 06:29:14 AM »
A common error, even in newspapers and on TV: John Jones hung himself. No, John Jones hanged himself.

People are hanged, clothes are hung. (I'm not sure about animals though.)
Now that one really does pee me off, even more so as in an episode of Victoria, she actually said it. As if the Queen of England would make that mistake.

I always refer to my animals in books as though they are the same as humans, because they are to me. It would be 'a dog who' not 'a dog that'.

On that subject, it annoys me when I read a person being referred to as that. The man that did something.


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Re: For heaven's sake, people, you're authors.
« Reply #74 on: November 05, 2017, 06:30:43 AM »
dragged not drug !!
This thread reminds me of an IT Crowd episode - 'pedalstool', 'damp squid' and 'ma love'  :)
Have you ever encountered an undamp squid? Or an unsoggy octopus, for that matter...


:)