Author Topic: For heaven's sake, people, you're authors.  (Read 30651 times)  

Online TobiasRoote

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Re: For heaven's sake, people, you're authors.
« Reply #400 on: November 18, 2017, 03:04:18 AM »
Another case of an English second language speaker not hearing correctly (probably due to accents). A hug saw instead of a hacksaw.

could be a hug[e] saw? I see this type of error a lot where a word is still a word even when there's a letter missing. Everyone misses those (except me apparently.) :P


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Offline RBN

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Re: For heaven's sake, people, you're authors.
« Reply #401 on: November 18, 2017, 03:45:22 AM »
The next time Google tells me to replace "all right" with "alright" I'm filing a class action lawsuit.

One fine day, Google suggested I meant "upto," as in "I've had it upto here with whoever entered these words into the system."

I think it's a sign of the future. First, they came for commas. When all punctuation is gone, they'll work in earnest on taking the spaces. Finally, what's the point of letters when they're just a solid block of unintelligible gibberish? Forget written language and watch this endless stream of auto-playing videos instead!

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Re: For heaven's sake, people, you're authors.
« Reply #402 on: November 18, 2017, 04:56:10 AM »
could be a hug[e] saw? I see this type of error a lot where a word is still a word even when there's a letter missing. Everyone misses those (except me apparently.) :P

It was a workman who sent a message asking if he'd left his hug saw behind  :)

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Re: For heaven's sake, people, you're authors.
« Reply #403 on: November 18, 2017, 04:59:51 AM »
The next time Google tells me to replace "all right" with "alright" I'm filing a class action lawsuit.

I hear aswell as one word all the time, with the emphasis on AS, instead of as well. Expect to see it in print soon  ::)

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Re: For heaven's sake, people, you're authors.
« Reply #404 on: November 18, 2017, 07:40:08 AM »
LOL! This is brilliant. And would be perfect for one of my epic fantasies... hmm, ponders the possibilities...
Help yourself :)


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Re: For heaven's sake, people, you're authors.
« Reply #405 on: November 18, 2017, 08:02:48 AM »
It was a workman who sent a message asking if he'd left his hug saw behind  :)

I see that as just a typo. If your fingers slide one key to the left jig saw becomes hug saw.


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Re: For heaven's sake, people, you're authors.
« Reply #406 on: November 18, 2017, 08:37:52 AM »
I see that as just a typo. If your fingers slide one key to the left jig saw becomes hug saw.

Maybe that is the answer  :) But it was a hacksaw and not a jigsaw that he used.

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Offline Valerie A.

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Re: For heaven's sake, people, you're authors.
« Reply #407 on: November 19, 2017, 07:14:54 PM »
I read and hear this all the time: "orientate" instead of "orient" (verb). What gives? And what next: orientatate?

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Re: For heaven's sake, people, you're authors.
« Reply #408 on: November 19, 2017, 07:42:44 PM »
I read and hear this all the time: "orientate" instead of "orient" (verb). What gives? And what next: orientatate?

That one bugs me, too.
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Re: For heaven's sake, people, you're authors.
« Reply #409 on: November 20, 2017, 12:07:44 AM »
I read and hear this all the time: "orientate" instead of "orient" (verb). What gives? And what next: orientatate?
I think you'll hear 'orient' in the US and 'orientate' in the UK. I first noticed it when I moved to the UK. Sort of like the extra letter in aluminum/aluminium.


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Re: For heaven's sake, people, you're authors.
« Reply #410 on: November 20, 2017, 12:15:14 AM »
I think you'll hear 'orient' in the US and 'orientate' in the UK. I first noticed it when I moved to the UK. Sort of like the extra letter in aluminum/aluminium.

My dictionary agrees with this  :). I'm from the UK and would always say 'orientate'. The other would be The Orient.  ;)

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Re: For heaven's sake, people, you're authors.
« Reply #411 on: November 20, 2017, 04:23:05 AM »
Another one that I hear all the time and that drives me nuts, has now crept into print. "You coming to work, aren't you?" "You in Denver, aren't you?" "We going to the movies."
It was bad enough when you're was your, now we don't even have that  ::).

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Offline WHDean

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Re: For heaven's sake, people, you're authors.
« Reply #412 on: November 20, 2017, 06:55:13 AM »
Orient and orientate arise from the way French (and Latin) verbs are anglicized, which is usually done by adding the -ate suffix to the French verb stem: creer becomes create, separer becomes separate, isoler becomes isolate, participer becomes participate, and so on. Some words don't follow the pattern. Interpret is another one. The pattern says interpretate, but it's not used in British or American English. Yet interpretative is still accepted usage (along with interpretive). I don't know how much this has to do with differences in the speakers and how much simply to chance.




Offline Valerie A.

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Re: For heaven's sake, people, you're authors.
« Reply #413 on: November 20, 2017, 07:29:12 AM »
Orient and orientate arise from the way French (and Latin) verbs are anglicized, which is usually done by adding the -ate suffix to the French verb stem: creer becomes create, separer becomes separate, isoler becomes isolate, participer becomes participate, and so on. Some words don't follow the pattern. Interpret is another one. The pattern says interpretate, but it's not used in British or American English. Yet interpretative is still accepted usage (along with interpretive). I don't know how much this has to do with differences in the speakers and how much simply to chance.
That makes sense, thank you.

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Offline Jim Johnson

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Re: For heaven's sake, people, you're authors.
« Reply #414 on: November 20, 2017, 07:30:14 AM »
Read the first chapter promo for a friend's upcoming tradpub book, and there were two instances of "he reasoned" at the start of two paragraphs within four paragraphs, and a misuse of 'racked' for 'wracked'. I didn't have the heart to ask if the promo was the final copy-edited version or if it still needed to go through proofing.

Offline Paranormal Kitty

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Re: For heaven's sake, people, you're authors.
« Reply #415 on: November 20, 2017, 08:49:30 AM »
Another one that I hear all the time and that drives me nuts, has now crept into print. "You coming to work, aren't you?" "You in Denver, aren't you?" "We going to the movies."
It was bad enough when you're was your, now we don't even have that  ::).

If it's in dialogue, that's just how the character talks. It's a feature of some dialects.

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Re: For heaven's sake, people, you're authors.
« Reply #416 on: November 20, 2017, 02:57:57 PM »
Jive and Jibe.   

Jive is jargon, music, or dance related.

Jibe (non-nautical) means to fit or agree with. A lot of people say jive when they mean jibe. "That jives with my experience." ;)


Offline Lynn Is A Pseudonym

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Re: For heaven's sake, people, you're authors.
« Reply #417 on: November 20, 2017, 04:24:55 PM »
Jive and Jibe.   

Jive is jargon, music, or dance related.

Jibe (non-nautical) means to fit or agree with. A lot of people say jive when they mean jibe. "That jives with my experience." ;)

That's a good one. I bet I've made that mistake. I've never used it in a book though, so yay for that. :)

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Re: For heaven's sake, people, you're authors.
« Reply #418 on: November 20, 2017, 04:39:44 PM »
Jive and Jibe.   

Jive is jargon, music, or dance related.

Jibe (non-nautical) means to fit or agree with. A lot of people say jive when they mean jibe. "That jives with my experience." ;)



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Offline RBN

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Re: For heaven's sake, people, you're authors.
« Reply #419 on: November 21, 2017, 04:51:18 AM »
"a suddle taste"

I could have assumed "subtle" was a missed intention, but I like words, so I looked up "suddle." Per M-W:

Scottish & dialectal, England: stain, soil

Mm, tasty (especially given the context, which I'll spare you :'().

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Re: For heaven's sake, people, you're authors.
« Reply #420 on: November 21, 2017, 05:07:45 AM »
I read and hear this all the time: "orientate" instead of "orient" (verb). What gives? And what next: orientatate?

This bothers me, also.  Similar to this, which (silly confession time!) I hear on old Perry Mason reruns, is relevancy as opposed to relevance.
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Re: For heaven's sake, people, you're authors.
« Reply #421 on: November 21, 2017, 07:54:15 AM »
I may have found my favorite thread in the whole world  ;D


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Re: For heaven's sake, people, you're authors.
« Reply #422 on: November 21, 2017, 11:30:44 AM »
This bothers me, also.  Similar to this, which (silly confession time!) I hear on old Perry Mason reruns, is relevancy as opposed to relevance.

According to the OED, Latin actions nouns adopted into English through French originally used the French suffixes -ance or -ence, depending on the verbal root (e.g., prudence, elegance, relevance). These words could connote an action, process, quality, state, or condition. Later on, English writers adopted Latin and French words with the -ancy or -ency suffix specifically for expressing the quality, state, or condition. Sometimes, the -ance/-ence words were refashioned as -ancy/-ency words and distinguished in sense from the earlier form. The only pair I can recall off the top of my head is resilience and resiliency. Some psychologist use resilience for the psychological process and resiliency for the quality of being resilient.

As for relevance/relevancy, Garner's Modern American Usage says relevance is preferred in British and American English. A Google Ngram search supports that conclusion. Nonetheless, I have found relevancy in legal dictionaries, so it may have more purchase there. But then Garner has also written a guide to legal usage, so the weight of evidence leans toward relevance as accepted for all uses.



Offline Abalone

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Re: For heaven's sake, people, you're authors.
« Reply #423 on: November 21, 2017, 12:29:01 PM »
Jive and Jibe.   

Jive is jargon, music, or dance related.

Jibe (non-nautical) means to fit or agree with. A lot of people say jive when they mean jibe. "That jives with my experience." ;)



I've heard these used in two ways.

"Jive turkey," which is some weird 70s thing. And jib, which I presume is a form of jibe? "I like the cut of your jib!"

Offline wilsonharp

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Re: For heaven's sake, people, you're authors.
« Reply #424 on: November 21, 2017, 12:59:38 PM »
And jib, which I presume is a form of jibe? "I like the cut of your jib!"

"I like the cut of your jib" comes from sailing parlance. It would be a reference to the forward most sail of a ship, and that sail often identified the nationality of the ship. Therefore, a friendly ship would like the cut of the jib of one of their countryman's ship.
     

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