Author Topic: For heaven's sake, people, you're authors.  (Read 30561 times)  

Offline WHDean

  • Status: Arthur C Clarke
  • *****
  • Posts: 2245
  • Gender: Male
  • Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
    • View Profile
Re: For heaven's sake, people, you're authors.
« Reply #425 on: November 21, 2017, 01:16:22 PM »
I've heard these used in two ways.

"Jive turkey," which is some weird 70s thing. And jib, which I presume is a form of jibe? "I like the cut of your jib!"

Not quite. We're dealing with three different words, each with a couple of meanings. I've summarized a bit:

Jive 1 (noun, verb, and adjective): Misleading, empty, or pretentious talk (e.g., "talking jive"), being pretentious (e.g., "jive turkey"), or taunting someone (i.e., "Stop jiving me").

Jive 2 (noun and verb): Dancing to swing music or other lively dancing; e.g., "We did the jive all night." "We jived all night long."

Jib 1 (noun and verb): A triangular sail on a ship (noun); a projecting arm or crane on certain other machines (noun); and pulling a sail from one side of the vessel to the other (verb).

Jib 2 (noun): appearance, style; hence, the idiom "I like the cut of your jib."

Jibe 1 (noun and verb): taunt, tease, or sneer at someone; e.g., "Stop jibing me."

Jibe 2 (verb): To be in harmony with; e.g., "They all jibe with one another." 

 

Online Jan Hurst-Nicholson

  • Status: Isaac Asimov
  • ********
  • Posts: 10884
  • Durban, South Africa
  • Don't let your emotions overpower your intellect
    • View Profile
    • www.just4kix.jimdo.com
Re: For heaven's sake, people, you're authors.
« Reply #426 on: November 22, 2017, 05:38:50 AM »
I can never decide between a tumble-dryer or a tumble-drier. According to the dictionary, both are acceptable.

I also have a problem with flys and flies. I don't think 'flys' is acceptable.

FLY  noun   [ C  ] INSECT  plural FLIES

FLIES When a bird, insect or aircraft flies, it moves through the air
    He's extremely irritable - he flies off the handle at the slightest thing.   


2.    FLIES [ plural ] UK   for   fly (TROUSERS)


There are many more entries for fly, but none with 'flys'.

Non-fiction, Fiction, family saga, humour, short stories, teen, children's
Jan Hurst-Nicholson | author website

Online Jan Hurst-Nicholson

  • Status: Isaac Asimov
  • ********
  • Posts: 10884
  • Durban, South Africa
  • Don't let your emotions overpower your intellect
    • View Profile
    • www.just4kix.jimdo.com
Re: For heaven's sake, people, you're authors.
« Reply #427 on: November 23, 2017, 01:56:55 AM »
Just seen this doing the rounds as a huge pink poster  ::).


Australias womens rugby team the Jillaroos beat Canadas Ravens 88 to nil in the world womens rugby league test today.

Non-fiction, Fiction, family saga, humour, short stories, teen, children's
Jan Hurst-Nicholson | author website

Offline Spin52

  • Status: Jane Austen
  • ***
  • Posts: 498
  • Gender: Female
  • Seattle and Oxfordshire
    • View Profile
    • Amazon author page
Re: For heaven's sake, people, you're authors.
« Reply #428 on: November 23, 2017, 02:49:46 AM »
Just seen this doing the rounds as a huge pink poster  ::).


Australias womens rugby team the Jillaroos beat Canadas Ravens 88 to nil in the world womens rugby league test today.

They obviously didn't want to waste any space on apostrophes.


Tradtional mysteries with a dash of humor -- no cats, no cupcakes
Facebook | Amazon author page | D2D author page

Offline Abalone

  • Status: Arthur Conan Doyle
  • ****
  • Posts: 960
    • View Profile
Re: For heaven's sake, people, you're authors.
« Reply #429 on: November 23, 2017, 05:14:35 AM »
They obviously didn't want to waste any space on apostrophes.

Can't expect much from a country full of convicts.



Kidding! :)

Offline Mylius Fox

  • Status: Jane Austen
  • ***
  • Posts: 426
  • Cognitive syntactical wizard.
    • View Profile
Re: For heaven's sake, people, you're authors.
« Reply #430 on: November 23, 2017, 05:36:01 AM »
I read and hear this all the time: "orientate" instead of "orient" (verb). What gives? And what next: orientatate?

Orientate as a verb goes back to the mid-nineteenth century, apparently. I've never noticed anyone ever using "orient" as a verb, even though I'm from the States... 

Offline Doglover

  • Status: Edgar Allan Poe
  • *******
  • Posts: 5013
  • Gender: Female
  • Huntingdon, United Kingdom
  • If you want real love, buy a dog.
    • View Profile
    • Margaret Brazear Author
Re: For heaven's sake, people, you're authors.
« Reply #431 on: November 23, 2017, 05:53:45 AM »
Orientate as a verb goes back to the mid-nineteenth century, apparently. I've never noticed anyone ever using "orient" as a verb, even though I'm from the States... 
I've never heard that either. The word is orientate, at least it is in the United Kingdom.


The past is another country; they do things differently there
Margaret Brazear | Website | Blog | Facebook | Readers Group | Newsletter

Offline WHDean

  • Status: Arthur C Clarke
  • *****
  • Posts: 2245
  • Gender: Male
  • Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
    • View Profile
Re: For heaven's sake, people, you're authors.
« Reply #432 on: November 23, 2017, 06:48:47 AM »
I've never noticed anyone ever using "orient" as a verb, even though I'm from the States... 

Check the Corpus of Contemporary American English. You'll find the verb form is pretty common:

https://corpus.byu.edu/coca/




Offline Mylius Fox

  • Status: Jane Austen
  • ***
  • Posts: 426
  • Cognitive syntactical wizard.
    • View Profile
Re: For heaven's sake, people, you're authors.
« Reply #433 on: November 23, 2017, 06:54:42 AM »
Check the Corpus of Contemporary American English. You'll find the verb form is pretty common:

https://corpus.byu.edu/coca/

That's what's so weird about it; I'm pretty sure my mind would've picked up on it if I'd seen it that way. *shrugs

Offline Jena H

  • Status: Edgar Allan Poe
  • *******
  • Posts: 6731
  • North Carolina
  • Desperate character
    • View Profile
Re: For heaven's sake, people, you're authors.
« Reply #434 on: November 23, 2017, 07:22:35 AM »
Orientate as a verb goes back to the mid-nineteenth century, apparently. I've never noticed anyone ever using "orient" as a verb, even though I'm from the States...

Really?  I've heard it quite a bit over the years.  No specific, exact-wording examples, but something like "he was able to orient himself by the sun's position," or "the house was oriented toward the mountain view."  No reasonable person would use the word orientate in those situations.
Jena

Offline WHDean

  • Status: Arthur C Clarke
  • *****
  • Posts: 2245
  • Gender: Male
  • Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
    • View Profile
Re: For heaven's sake, people, you're authors.
« Reply #435 on: November 23, 2017, 07:41:41 AM »
That's what's so weird about it; I'm pretty sure my mind would've picked up on it if I'd seen it that way. *shrugs

When this happens to me, I look at the phrases or expressions the word appears in. That usually jogs my memory. Orient is commonly used with reflexive pronouns (e.g., orient ourselves, orient himself, orient themselves), in orienteering (finding your way on land by map and compass) and the figurative sense of finding one's way or orienting oneself, and in astronomy (orient yourself to the night sky). You'll also see it used in compound adjectives like "service-oriented architecture," which has its own Wikipedia page (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Service-oriented_architecture).

Ring any bells now?

     

Offline Mylius Fox

  • Status: Jane Austen
  • ***
  • Posts: 426
  • Cognitive syntactical wizard.
    • View Profile
Re: For heaven's sake, people, you're authors.
« Reply #436 on: November 23, 2017, 08:18:43 AM »
When this happens to me, I look at the phrases or expressions the word appears in. That usually jogs my memory. Orient is commonly used with reflexive pronouns (e.g., orient ourselves, orient himself, orient themselves), in orienteering (finding your way on land by map and compass) and the figurative sense of finding one's way or orienting oneself, and in astronomy (orient yourself to the night sky). You'll also see it used in compound adjectives like "service-oriented architecture," which has its own Wikipedia page (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Service-oriented_architecture).

Ring any bells now?   

Service-oriented definitely rang true, but "orient ourselves" sounds completely foreign to me. Maybe this is why Microsoft Word always automatically detects my language as English (U.K.)... :D

Online TobiasRoote

  • Status: Arthur Conan Doyle
  • ****
  • Posts: 654
  • Gender: Male
  • Greece
    • View Profile
    • Tobias Roote Books
Re: For heaven's sake, people, you're authors.
« Reply #437 on: November 23, 2017, 08:23:46 AM »
Service-oriented definitely rang true, but "orient ourselves" sounds completely foreign to me. Maybe this is why Microsoft Word always automatically detects my language as English (U.K.)... :D

Nah! I'm UK and orient works for me in lots of situations. Although, I regularly come across words that I personally never use in sentences being used by others. It's great to see the way different people think in writing.  Although the one thing I hate is repetition, so tend to use odd words judiciously for effect.


Tobias Roote | Website | Facebook | Twitter

Offline WHDean

  • Status: Arthur C Clarke
  • *****
  • Posts: 2245
  • Gender: Male
  • Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
    • View Profile
Re: For heaven's sake, people, you're authors.
« Reply #438 on: November 23, 2017, 11:04:31 AM »
Service-oriented definitely rang true, but "orient ourselves" sounds completely foreign to me. Maybe this is why Microsoft Word always automatically detects my language as English (U.K.)... :D

I was curious to see how common the verb orient is in thrillers, so I started with the also-boughts for your book and went on to look at a few other thriller writers. Of course, I could only check books that had previews on Google Books.

Mark Dawson has this line near the beginning of Chapter 2 of Saint Death:

Quote
Time enough to orient himself properly.

On page 279 of his autobiography, Shooter, Jack Coughlin has this line:

Quote
He called in the flanking companies to orient the battalion toward a technical university and the headquarters of the Iraqi air force.

Nelson DeMille seems to like the word. From Up Country:

Quote
Susan and I got out, and I looked around, trying to orient myself.

Nelson DeMille, The Talbot Odyssey,

Quote
Brooklyn was also the Borough of Churches, and Abrams was always able to orient himself by the dozens of familiar steeples whose clocks also gave him the time.

Nelson DeMille, The Quest: A Novel,

Quote
Purcell glanced at the map, then looked through the surrounding Plexiglas to orient himself.

James Patterson, Private L.A.,

Quote
She tried to orient herself based on her movements after she'd left Jennifer Harlow's closet, tried to figure out where the window faced.

As you can see, most are orient plus a reflexive pronoun. I'm betting you notice the next time you come across the word.  ;D

Offline Mylius Fox

  • Status: Jane Austen
  • ***
  • Posts: 426
  • Cognitive syntactical wizard.
    • View Profile
Re: For heaven's sake, people, you're authors.
« Reply #439 on: November 23, 2017, 01:25:06 PM »
I was curious to see how common the verb orient is in thrillers, so I started with the also-boughts for your book and went on to look at a few other thriller writers. Of course, I could only check books that had previews on Google Books.

Mark Dawson has this line near the beginning of Chapter 2 of Saint Death:

On page 279 of his autobiography, Shooter, Jack Coughlin has this line:

Nelson DeMille seems to like the word. From Up Country:

Nelson DeMille, The Talbot Odyssey,

Nelson DeMille, The Quest: A Novel,

James Patterson, Private L.A.,

As you can see, most are orient plus a reflexive pronoun. I'm betting you notice the next time you come across the word.  ;D

Yipes, I've read one by DeMille and one by Dawson, but not those in particular. When I have some spare time I'll have to go through my Kindle's "read" folder and search everything. :D I'm curious if it's just something for which I've had blinders on, or if by some weird fluke life has sheltered me from it. :P

Offline AnnaB

  • Status: Madeleine L'Engle
  • **
  • Posts: 83
    • View Profile
Re: For heaven's sake, people, you're authors.
« Reply #440 on: December 10, 2017, 12:20:12 PM »
The palate/palette/pallet cleanser is one that's popped up a few times over the last months.

Offline Becca Mills

  • Moderator
  • Status: Emily Dickinson
  • *****
  • Posts: 9356
  • Gender: Female
  • California
    • View Profile
    • website
Re: For heaven's sake, people, you're authors.
« Reply #441 on: December 10, 2017, 01:10:12 PM »
When this happens to me, I look at the phrases or expressions the word appears in. That usually jogs my memory. Orient is commonly used with reflexive pronouns (e.g., orient ourselves, orient himself, orient themselves), in orienteering (finding your way on land by map and compass) and the figurative sense of finding one's way or orienting oneself, and in astronomy (orient yourself to the night sky). You'll also see it used in compound adjectives like "service-oriented architecture," which has its own Wikipedia page (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Service-oriented_architecture).

Ring any bells now?

I wonder if orient/orientate is regionally patchy. I know I didn't notice "orientate" 'til I was in grad school, and when I first noticed it, it sounded so weird to me that I thought it was an error. So I clearly grew up in an ocean of "orient."

Online brkingsolver

  • Status: A A Milne
  • ******
  • Posts: 4278
  • Baltimore, MD
    • View Profile
Re: For heaven's sake, people, you're authors.
« Reply #442 on: December 10, 2017, 01:43:04 PM »
I wonder if orient/orientate is regionally patchy. I know I didn't notice "orientate" 'til I was in grad school, and when I first noticed it, it sounded so weird to me that I thought it was an error. So I clearly grew up in an ocean of "orient."
^This^ I wonder if orientate is some kind of weird eastern affectation that's a hangover of their lost association with England. In the west, I've never heard it.

BR Kingsolver | Author website

Offline Becca Mills

  • Moderator
  • Status: Emily Dickinson
  • *****
  • Posts: 9356
  • Gender: Female
  • California
    • View Profile
    • website
Re: For heaven's sake, people, you're authors.
« Reply #443 on: December 10, 2017, 06:25:38 PM »
^This^ I wonder if orientate is some kind of weird eastern affectation that's a hangover of their lost association with England. In the west, I've never heard it.

I grew up in the east, albeit more to the south. One Midwestern parent, one northeastern parent. So ... dunno.

Offline Jena H

  • Status: Edgar Allan Poe
  • *******
  • Posts: 6731
  • North Carolina
  • Desperate character
    • View Profile
Re: For heaven's sake, people, you're authors.
« Reply #444 on: December 10, 2017, 06:54:03 PM »
^This^ I wonder if orientate is some kind of weird eastern affectation that's a hangover of their lost association with England. In the west, I've never heard it.

I grew up in the east, albeit more to the south. One Midwestern parent, one northeastern parent. So ... dunno.

Yeah, east-coaster here too.  And to this day orientate just sounds...  off.  Sort of like when someone thinks they know a word, but morph it just enough to sound legit even if it's not really a word.  Like truthiness, or refudiate.
Jena

Offline jasonbladd

  • Status: Jane Austen
  • ***
  • Posts: 282
    • View Profile
    • jasonbladd.com
Re: For heaven's sake, people, you're authors.
« Reply #445 on: December 10, 2017, 07:07:45 PM »
I hope you're going to talk to this a little more with a few replies

Offline CynthiaClay

  • Status: Jane Austen
  • ***
  • Posts: 298
    • View Profile
    • Cynthia Joyce Clay
Re: For heaven's sake, people, you're authors.
« Reply #446 on: December 10, 2017, 09:57:47 PM »
[quote ]
The word is tuition; not intuition.
[/quote]

The other person was making a good joke since all intuition is private. Public intuition sounds like a great idea for a fantasy novel, though. "Let us gather for public intuition. Please join hands..."]

My major grammar peeve is:

I snuck into the attack. [Wrong! Wrong! Wrong! Like bring, brang, brung is wrong.]

I sneaked into the attack. [This is the correct form because sneak is a regular verb. Why make a regular verb irregular?]

There is also this mistake:

He is taller than me. [wrong]
He is taller than I am. [Or, He is taller than I.]
He likes her better than me. [So you are jealous? If so, it's correct. If that's not what you mean, then it is incorrect.]
He likes her better than I like her. [Or, He likes her better than I do.]

Thanks for supporting my art.
Cynthia Joyce Clay | Cynthia Joyce Clay's Blog | Plays I've Filmed | Cynthia Joyce Clay's Blog

Offline CynthiaClay

  • Status: Jane Austen
  • ***
  • Posts: 298
    • View Profile
    • Cynthia Joyce Clay
Re: For heaven's sake, people, you're authors.
« Reply #447 on: December 10, 2017, 10:02:12 PM »
As a small child I always used to say "I could care less.... but I'm not sure how."

 ;D :P ;D :P I love it.

Thanks for supporting my art.
Cynthia Joyce Clay | Cynthia Joyce Clay's Blog | Plays I've Filmed | Cynthia Joyce Clay's Blog

Offline CynthiaClay

  • Status: Jane Austen
  • ***
  • Posts: 298
    • View Profile
    • Cynthia Joyce Clay
Re: For heaven's sake, people, you're authors.
« Reply #448 on: December 10, 2017, 10:08:31 PM »
Do Americans really say, "He dove into the swimming pool"?

Seems really odd to me.

Yep.

He might also have dived into a river or the ocean, but those in the middle of the country most likely have to make do with a swimming pool.

Biscuits for cookies always strikes my American ear as odd, but c'est la vie.

Americans are also dreadfully prone to snucking about. Snuck puts me in torments.

Thanks for supporting my art.
Cynthia Joyce Clay | Cynthia Joyce Clay's Blog | Plays I've Filmed | Cynthia Joyce Clay's Blog

Offline CynthiaClay

  • Status: Jane Austen
  • ***
  • Posts: 298
    • View Profile
    • Cynthia Joyce Clay
Re: For heaven's sake, people, you're authors.
« Reply #449 on: December 10, 2017, 10:14:02 PM »
"should of" instead of should have.

this makes me nuts.

"Would of" is more of the same.

Thanks for supporting my art.
Cynthia Joyce Clay | Cynthia Joyce Clay's Blog | Plays I've Filmed | Cynthia Joyce Clay's Blog