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Flight of the Tarantula Hawk
by Michael Allan Scott

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Kindle Edition published 2014-02-10
Bestseller ranking: 4698

Product Description
On the IndieReader Best Book list and featured on NBC's Daytime Show, the second book in the Lance Underphal Mystery series is part of a new breed of supernatural thrillers which can be read and enjoyed in any order. Dark, different, featuring a damaged psychic, this is one of those disturbing novels that keeps you guessing.

Download the sample or use the "Look inside" feature for a FREE E-book offer.

Supernatural Murder Mystery - Realtor Carla Simon has her first showing in nearly eighteen months. Recovering from a nervous breakdown, she arrives at the bank-owned foreclosure well ahead of her prospect. When her buyer pins her against the wall, it turns out to be the last house she'll ever show.

Looking for a new breed of supernatural thrillers? Paranormal mysteries of murder and suspense? Perhaps a psychic detective series which can be read and enjoyed in any order? Or maybe one of t...

Author Topic: Things to keep in mind when writing a 'spy' series?  (Read 361 times)  

Offline AlisonHinds

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Things to keep in mind when writing a 'spy' series?
« on: December 06, 2017, 07:04:18 AM »
Hello!

I'm thinking of writing a series with a female MC, a spy more or less, who operates in various locales. Grittier than James Bond. I do want to maintain that fantasy element though. What are some things to keep in mind? I watch shows and movies about spies, CIA, Mi6, Spooks, etc but I know writing a book would be very different.

Thank you!
« Last Edit: December 06, 2017, 07:06:00 AM by AlisonHinds »

Offline Mercedes Vox

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Re: Things to keep in mind when writing a 'spy' series?
« Reply #1 on: December 06, 2017, 07:17:18 AM »
Read some popular spy novels (John le Carre, Robert Ludlum, Tom Clancy, Ken Follet, Lee Child, etcetera). Also read some spy-related nonfiction for balance.

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Romance provocateur. Manic stealth author. Fearless gourmet. An epicurean anarchist relentlessly in pursuit of a foolproof cure for ennui. Committed (thrice).

Offline Spinneyhead

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Re: Things to keep in mind when writing a 'spy' series?
« Reply #2 on: December 06, 2017, 07:26:59 AM »
I don't know if it will be available in your location, but I've started reading a magazine called Eye Spy, which takes a look at the workings of the intelligence services (as much as it can). It's got lots of interesting little bits of info that could be dropped into a story for veracity. They could do with a better copy editor, but I'll put up with that for the insight provided.

I've been reading some good spy non-fiction recently as well, gearing up to get back into my espionage/crime series. The Art of Betrayal by John Correra, Nazi Hunters by Damian Lewis, and The Secret War by MAx Hastings. They're all historical, but some aspects of tradecraft- and all of teh paranoia- will still be relevant in the modern age.

Offline Rick Partlow

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Re: Things to keep in mind when writing a 'spy' series?
« Reply #3 on: December 06, 2017, 07:43:21 AM »
Read some popular spy novels (John le Carre, Robert Ludlum, Tom Clancy, Ken Follet, Lee Child, etcetera). Also read some spy-related nonfiction for balance.

Is Lee Child's stuff considered "spy novels?"

Offline AlisonHinds

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Re: Things to keep in mind when writing a 'spy' series?
« Reply #4 on: December 06, 2017, 06:33:59 PM »
Thank you for responding guys! This is a pretty good start!

Online Dennis Chekalov

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Re: Things to keep in mind when writing a 'spy' series?
« Reply #5 on: December 07, 2017, 02:48:30 AM »
Find a Russian beta reader when writing about Russians.
Beta Reading & Developmental Editing Services. Free sample edit up to 1000 words.

Offline Scarlettletters

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Re: Things to keep in mind when writing a 'spy' series?
« Reply #6 on: December 07, 2017, 04:49:20 AM »
Are you familiar with guns? Have you ever fired one?

If not, for spy novels and any mystery/thriller novels you may write, it's worth it to go to a gun range and take a few shooting lessons, firing different types of guns. 

I read a book the other day which had a character "thumbing the safety off a Glock" before firing it and it was like nails on a chalkboard to me.  No they did NOT thumb the non-existent safety off.

Your hero/heroine may or may not fire a gun, but in a book about spies, somebody's going to be packing.  What type of gun would a spy use? Where would he carry it on his or her body? If he's travelling, how would he get it through the airport?

I like this book, both for personal safety kind of info, and for background info on spies:

https://www.amazon.com/Secrets-That-Save-Your-Life/dp/0399175679


Offline Mylius Fox

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Re: Things to keep in mind when writing a 'spy' series?
« Reply #7 on: December 07, 2017, 04:58:10 AM »
Is Lee Child's stuff considered "spy novels?"

I've seen his books mentioned on "best spy novel" lists a lot... it's a loose association, but some of the same elements are in play, and I think that must be enough for most people.
I'd add Daniel Silva and Barry Eisler to the list as well.