Author Topic: Your words  (Read 418 times)  


Offline Shelley K

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Re: Your words
« Reply #1 on: January 12, 2018, 11:58:54 AM »
Writing is the only way to improve writing skills.

You can also read craft books, but if you're not putting the things you're reading about into practice by actually writing, you're just wasting time.

You write for a company that teaches people to write and life coaches them. Flatly stunned you needed to ask.
« Last Edit: January 12, 2018, 12:04:12 PM by Shelley K »

Offline wheart

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Re: Your words
« Reply #2 on: January 12, 2018, 12:59:09 PM »
Yes, I believe that reading other authors' works most certainly helps with writing skills.

When you read various top selling authors/books (of past and present), you can get a feel of, not only how they work the story, make you fall in love with their characters, etc., but the flow of the words.

I'm not talking purple prose type writing (although if you're a writer who likes that type, then seek out that type of books), I'm talking smooth flowing, engaging, savory type reading where you are so engrossed in the story that you aren't ever aware of anything but the story.

One such writer, although I don't read/write Westerns, is Louis L'Amour. Here, read this preview and tell me you don't think that's awesome storytelling and freakin' skillful writing.

That's the kind of smooth writing/storytelling that just flows off the tongue/brain, which I'm sure we all strive for. There are many writers who accomplish that in similar fashion but with different flavor to their style (especially because they ain't writing Westerns, lol). You'll know when you come across excellent writing/storytelling.

By reading stories by others authors, I feel most definitely that it can help our own writing skills. No doubt about it.

And yes, Shelley is right that you need to actually get in the practice, but there is much value in reading other authors' works to become a powerful writer/author/storyteller ourselves.
« Last Edit: January 12, 2018, 01:23:19 PM by wheart »

Offline Shelley K

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Re: Your words
« Reply #3 on: January 12, 2018, 02:07:49 PM »
Yeah, you have to read the works of other authors as part of it. You should. But if you're not reading anyway, it begs the question of why you want to write. If someone doesn't eat desserts, what would possess them to become a pastry chef who then has to be told she has to sample other chefs' desserts to know what they're supposed to taste like?

I guess there are those who decide to write books primarily for money who've maybe never read a dozen books in their lives (we all have our different reasons), but I think most, almost all, people who want to write in the first place want to because they love to read. It feels like such a given it should go without saying.

Offline wheart

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Re: Your words
« Reply #4 on: January 12, 2018, 02:53:35 PM »
but I think most, almost all, people who want to write in the first place want to because they love to read. It feels like such a given it should go without saying.

Personally, I would rather watch a movie than read a book, actually, ha! Especially epic novels like 'Game of Thrones', yikes. But I'm not interested at this time to be a playwright and try to sell scripts to movie/TV producers. It's a heck of a lot easier for me to write and sell books on Amazon and the like.

I was never an avid reader. In fact, before I retired my business, I hardly read any fiction after my college years, since I worked long hours, day and night. I read now because of the reasons I stated in my first post and to hit market tropes. I find it more valuable than reading even craft books.

Never assume anything, is my motto ;), thus I chose to answer Muyassar's post. I thought it a fair question.

Online williammeikle

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Re: Your words
« Reply #5 on: January 12, 2018, 04:03:52 PM »
Stephen King 'If you don't have time to read, you don't have the time (or the tools) to write. Simple as that.'

I believe that to be true.

"One of the premier storytellers of our time" - FAMOUS MONSTERS OF FILMLAND
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Offline Shelley K

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Re: Your words
« Reply #6 on: January 12, 2018, 05:28:38 PM »
Personally, I would rather watch a movie than read a book, actually, ha! Especially epic novels like 'Game of Thrones', yikes. But I'm not interested at this time to be a playwright and try to sell scripts to movie/TV producers. It's a heck of a lot easier for me to write and sell books on Amazon and the like.

I was never an avid reader. In fact, before I retired my business, I hardly read any fiction after my college years, since I worked long hours, day and night. I read now because of the reasons I stated in my first post and to hit market tropes. I find it more valuable than reading even craft books.

Never assume anything, is my motto ;), thus I chose to answer Muyassar's post. I thought it a fair question.

Yes, and you're the exception I allowed for by saying most, almost all.
« Last Edit: January 12, 2018, 05:30:10 PM by Shelley K »