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Grey Daze: A Lance Underphal Mystery
by Michael Allan Scott


Kindle Edition published 2015-03-29
Bestseller ranking: 167157

Product Description
An IAN Book of the Year Finalist and featured on NBC's Daytime Show, the third book in the Lance Underphal Mystery series is part of a new breed of supernatural thrillers which can be read and enjoyed in any order. Based on real events, this is one of those dark, disturbing novels that keeps you turning pages.
 
Download the sample or use the "Look inside" feature for a FREE E-book offer.
 
It's a mystery- Something is wrong. As Lance Underphal pads softly across the cold flagstone, he hears her weeping. She is on her knees, hunched over in the middle of the room, her back to him, facing the dark fireplace. Something is very wrong. Lance wants to rush to her, but can't. In a hoarse whisper, he says, "Callie?" She lets out a mournful wail from deep within as she turns, their infant son in her arms, blue and still. He reels from the blow. How can this be? They don't have a son.
 

Author Topic: Do you still consider yourself an Indie author?  (Read 2110 times)  

Offline Sam Rivers

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Do you still consider yourself an Indie author?
« on: January 13, 2018, 09:09:33 AM »
http://blog.smashwords.com/2017/12/2018-book-industry-predictions.html

Mark Coker wrote an interesting article that has many ideas to think about. He implies that authors that put their books in KU are dependent authors instead of independent authors. It is true that these authors are required to be exclusive so are dependent on Amazon for revenue.

They are still Indie authors since they can leave Select after 90 days and go wide. The problem is going wide is not as great as it used to be. So many authors stay put where they can get money each month.

Do you still consider yourself an Indie author?
« Last Edit: January 13, 2018, 09:11:44 AM by Sam Rivers »
Everything is theoretically impossible, until it is done.

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Offline Anarchist

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Re: Do you still consider yourself an Indie author?
« Reply #1 on: January 13, 2018, 09:27:59 AM »
I consider myself an entrepreneur. I follow opportunity.

"Indie author" is a title that's becoming less meaningful each year.
"Opportunity is missed by most people because it is dressed in overalls and looks like work." - Thomas Edison

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Offline Lorri Moulton

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Re: Do you still consider yourself an Indie author?
« Reply #2 on: January 13, 2018, 09:35:16 AM »
Absolutely.  I decide my schedule, my release dates, my prices, my avenues of distribution...that's independent.  Amazon has some great ways of promoting books, but I own the business and make the decisions.

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Offline NikolasTorVald

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Re: Do you still consider yourself an Indie author?
« Reply #3 on: January 13, 2018, 09:50:56 AM »
I feel like independent has more to do with you owning the rights to everything you have, so you can choose at any time what happens to it. If KU forced a lifetime commitment then I feel it would no longer be Indie. But since there's always the opportunity to leave I don't think it impacts the definition at all.

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Offline D. Zollicoffer

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Re: Do you still consider yourself an Indie author?
« Reply #4 on: January 13, 2018, 09:56:52 AM »
Absolutely.  I decide my schedule, my release dates, my prices, my avenues of distribution...that's independent.  Amazon has some great ways of promoting books, but I own the business and make the decisions.
Bingo. Putting something on their store doesn't make us any less indie.

Offline MClayton

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Re: Do you still consider yourself an Indie author?
« Reply #5 on: January 13, 2018, 10:27:22 AM »
http://blog.smashwords.com/2017/12/2018-book-industry-predictions.html

Mark Coker wrote an interesting article that has many ideas to think about. He implies that authors that put their books in KU are dependent authors instead of independent authors. It is true that these authors are required to be exclusive so are dependent on Amazon for revenue.

They are still Indie authors since they can leave Select after 90 days and go wide. The problem is going wide is not as great as it used to be. So many authors stay put where they can get money each month.

Do you still consider yourself an Indie author?

I appreciate all Mark has done for self-publishing, but he isn't exactly unbiased when it comes to his posts about Amazon.

Offline G.L. Snodgrass

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Re: Do you still consider yourself an Indie author?
« Reply #6 on: January 13, 2018, 10:42:36 AM »
If I used Smashwords to distribute my books. Would that mean I was dependent upon Smashwords and therefore not an Indie Author.

Articles like this are ridiculous. What a business man thinks about people who don't use his business is biased, misinformed and just plain stupid. I do what is in my best interest, not Mark Corker's. I can do that because I am independent and not reliant on what someone else says is best for me.

For years now, people have been saying I was stupid/wrong/evil for using KU. If I had listened to them I would have lost over $200K. Their advice and condemnation was/is wrong for me. That is what I love about being Indie. I don't have to listen to them and can do what I want. What better definition of Indie is there?

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Online Rick Partlow

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Re: Do you still consider yourself an Indie author?
« Reply #7 on: January 13, 2018, 10:47:47 AM »
The article is a load by someone in whose interest it is to criticize Amazon.  If Amazon owned the long-term rights to my books, I would be a contracted author.  Since all you agree to is a 90-day term, Mark's assertions are beyond ludicrous.  It's akin to saying that, since you have to give 30 days notice to break your lease at an apartment, you work for the company that owns the apartment.

Offline Seneca42

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Re: Do you still consider yourself an Indie author?
« Reply #8 on: January 13, 2018, 10:50:05 AM »
I don't even consider myself an author, much less an indie author. I've written some books, sold some books, have some fans... but I still don't consider myself an author.

To me, the title of "author" I reserve for the day when I have enough fans/readers that I know I can write for the rest of my life. I kind of see it as a professional moniker, not just something someone gets because they wrote a book. So until then, I'm just some guy writing books in the hopes that people will like them.

But I do agree with Mark's sentiment... if you're beholden to single vendor, you really aren't independent. Whether or not you chose that is another debate (is it really a choice if you can't sell elsewhere and make money?).


Offline Amanda M. Lee

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Re: Do you still consider yourself an Indie author?
« Reply #9 on: January 13, 2018, 11:04:34 AM »
I consider myself a Jedi knight. I'm always looking for a lightsaber.

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Offline Rosie A.

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Re: Do you still consider yourself an Indie author?
« Reply #10 on: January 13, 2018, 11:49:36 AM »
If I used Smashwords to distribute my books. Would that mean I was dependent upon Smashwords and therefore not an Indie Author.

Articles like this are ridiculous. What a business man thinks about people who don't use his business is biased, misinformed and just plain stupid. I do what is in my best interest, not Mark Corker's. I can do that because I am independent and not reliant on what someone else says is best for me.

For years now, people have been saying I was stupid/wrong/evil for using KU. If I had listened to them I would have lost over $200K. Their advice and condemnation was/is wrong for me. That is what I love about being Indie. I don't have to listen to them and can do what I want. What better definition of Indie is there?
Agreed. Well stated.
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Offline Anna Drake

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Re: Do you still consider yourself an Indie author?
« Reply #11 on: January 13, 2018, 11:55:42 AM »
Absolutely.  I decide my schedule, my release dates, my prices, my avenues of distribution...that's independent.  Amazon has some great ways of promoting books, but I own the business and make the decisions.

This!!


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Offline Carol (was Dara)

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Re: Do you still consider yourself an Indie author?
« Reply #12 on: January 13, 2018, 12:23:34 PM »
I've sold some works to digital presses, print publishers, and audio publishers, while self-publishing others. I have self-pub books both in and out of KU. Labels aren't important to me but since I work for myself I generally say I'm independent, or sometimes hybrid. I identify most with the term "writer" and/or "publisher".

Offline Tizzy

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Re: Do you still consider yourself an Indie author?
« Reply #13 on: January 13, 2018, 12:45:30 PM »
They are still Indie authors since they can leave Select after 90 days and go wide. The problem is going wide is not as great as it used to be. So many authors stay put where they can get money each month.

This could be heavily contested. Many authors in this forum will say the opposite, that KU isn't as great as it used to be. As for "depending on Amazon" making you an indie or not, if you go wide you'll still depend on Google, Apple, Kobo, B&N, etcetera. You will always depend on something, and it's not how many things you depend on what makes you an indie. Nobody is 100% independent - even if I was to sell my novel only on my website, I'd depend on it. So using semantics to say some authors are indie and others aren't won't work.

Offline notjohn

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Re: Do you still consider yourself an Indie author?
« Reply #14 on: January 13, 2018, 01:15:23 PM »
As for "depending on Amazon" making you an indie or not, if you go wide you'll still depend on Google, Apple, Kobo, B&N, etcetera. You will always depend on something, and it's not how many things you depend on what makes you an indie. Nobody is 100% independent - even if I was to sell my novel only on my website, I'd depend on it. So using semantics to say some authors are indie and others aren't won't work.

A vendor with one customer has no independence at all. A vendor with fifty customers does. A vendor with one huge customer and six small ones is better off than the first guy but not nearly as free as the second. That's where I am, and I'll try almost anything to increase the ratio of small customers, because I know we are doomed if they go away.

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Offline Al Stevens

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Re: Do you still consider yourself an Indie author?
« Reply #15 on: January 13, 2018, 01:23:01 PM »
I'm a contrarian who resists being pigeonholed. :)

Offline C. Gockel

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Re: Do you still consider yourself an Indie author?
« Reply #16 on: January 13, 2018, 03:40:50 PM »
Quote
They are still Indie authors since they can leave Select after 90 days and go wide. The problem is going wide is not as great as it used to be. So many authors stay put where they can get money each month.

I have found this not to be true. I wonder why you say it?


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Offline C. Gold

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Re: Do you still consider yourself an Indie author?
« Reply #17 on: January 13, 2018, 04:27:04 PM »
Good grief. I just eyerolled. Use Select to get exposure and gain readers. When/if that avenue dries up, go wide. What's the big deal? I don't get the extreme hate on Select to the point of denigrating authors who use it as somehow less than those who go wide.

I use Select. I'm not a slave to it or less of an indie author because I CHOOSE a marketing strategy that will make me MORE MONEY and gain readers than going wide right off the bat would. Select is a choice that makes sense to me at this time for my business model. If you don't like it, go wide. I don't hate on authors who are wide. Why should they hate on me for being in Select?


 

Offline RH Tucker

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Re: Do you still consider yourself an Indie author?
« Reply #18 on: January 13, 2018, 06:23:22 PM »
http://blog.smashwords.com/2017/12/2018-book-industry-predictions.html

Mark Coker wrote an interesting article that has many ideas to think about. He implies that authors that put their books in KU are dependent authors instead of independent authors. It is true that these authors are required to be exclusive so are dependent on Amazon for revenue.

They are still Indie authors since they can leave Select after 90 days and go wide. The problem is going wide is not as great as it used to be. So many authors stay put where they can get money each month.

Do you still consider yourself an Indie author?

Haven't read the article, but doesn't that mean no matter where we go we'd not be considered independent. If we use Smashwords, D2D, Kobo or the like, by that line of thought, we're still not independent.  ::)


If I used Smashwords to distribute my books. Would that mean I was dependent upon Smashwords and therefore not an Indie Author.

Articles like this are ridiculous. What a business man thinks about people who don't use his business is biased, misinformed and just plain stupid. I do what is in my best interest, not Mark Corker's. I can do that because I am independent and not reliant on what someone else says is best for me.

For years now, people have been saying I was stupid/wrong/evil for using KU. If I had listened to them I would have lost over $200K. Their advice and condemnation was/is wrong for me. That is what I love about being Indie. I don't have to listen to them and can do what I want. What better definition of Indie is there?

Yep.  ;D

Offline CoraBuhlert

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Re: Do you still consider yourself an Indie author?
« Reply #19 on: January 13, 2018, 07:07:23 PM »
I like Mark Coker and Smashwords, but I don't agree with this particular article. And besides, I'm wide anyway. So yes, I definitely consider myself an indie author.

Offline LilyBLily

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Re: Do you still consider yourself an Indie author?
« Reply #20 on: January 13, 2018, 07:22:30 PM »
I don't consider my independence based on where I sell books.

I could be selling them at weekend crafts fairs out of the trunk of my car and never even have them up for sale anywhere else. Does that make me independent? I guess it could, but I haven't gone that route. What makes me independent is that I am the only one who decides whether a story of mine gets published and all the details of how it gets published. If I liked crowds, I'd probably enjoy the selling-out-of-my-trunk experience much more than I enjoy constantly refreshing my KDP tab.



Offline K'Sennia Visitor

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Re: Do you still consider yourself an Indie author?
« Reply #21 on: January 13, 2018, 07:56:24 PM »
 In my procrastinating opinion, anyone who still owns their work after publication is an indie, regardless of how many places they publish it.

Offline Tizzy

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Re: Do you still consider yourself an Indie author?
« Reply #22 on: January 13, 2018, 10:30:31 PM »
In my procrastinating opinion, anyone who still owns their work after publication is an indie, regardless of how many places they publish it.

This is basically what indie means across most markets, can't see why some people want to apply a different logic to it when it comes to the ebook market by arguing semantics. In gaming an indie company is one that isn't tied to the big publishers (EA, Bethesda, Warner, Square...) no matter in how many places they sell their games. In music an indie band is one that isn't signed up to a major label, no matter where or how they sell their music. In cinema an indie filmmaker is one that isn't making films for major Hollywood studios, no matter where or how their films are being shown or sold. Why should it be any different for writers? An indie writer is one who isn't contractually tied to the big five. Plain and simple. Where they choose to offer their work makes no different to their independent status.

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Re: Do you still consider yourself an Indie author?
« Reply #23 on: January 13, 2018, 10:45:44 PM »
Until I start advertising/promoting I consider myself a hobbyist. :P
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Offline JRTomlin

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Re: Do you still consider yourself an Indie author?
« Reply #24 on: January 13, 2018, 10:52:08 PM »
I appreciate all Mark has done for self-publishing, but he isn't exactly unbiased when it comes to his posts about Amazon.
This.

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Re: Do you still consider yourself an Indie author?
« Reply #25 on: January 13, 2018, 11:48:59 PM »
http://blog.smashwords.com/2017/12/2018-book-industry-predictions.html

Mark Coker wrote an interesting article that has many ideas to think about. He implies that authors that put their books in KU are dependent authors instead of independent authors. It is true that these authors are required to be exclusive so are dependent on Amazon for revenue.

They are still Indie authors since they can leave Select after 90 days and go wide. The problem is going wide is not as great as it used to be. So many authors stay put where they can get money each month.

Do you still consider yourself an Indie author?
As long as I publish what I like, when I like and choose everything I do, I am an indie author. I stay in select because the vast majority of my readers pay for that subscription. If I wrote in a different genre, I might keep those books out of select, but I still wouldn't bother putting them elsewhere. I have a few that are on other platforms and they sell a total of zilch.


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Offline she-la-ti-da

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Re: Do you still consider yourself an Indie author?
« Reply #26 on: January 14, 2018, 06:33:02 AM »
Yet more anti-Amazon nonsense. Like Tizzy said, why are the rules different for authors compared to others? I'm independent in that I am not contractually obligated to a major publishing house (or a minor one, for that matter). Should I sign such a contract, I would then either be traditionally published, or a hybrid. Sheesh.
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Offline Piano Jenny

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Re: Do you still consider yourself an Indie author?
« Reply #27 on: January 14, 2018, 07:38:48 AM »
I appreciate all Mark has done for self-publishing, but he isn't exactly unbiased when it comes to his posts about Amazon.

This.

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Offline XCulletto

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Re: Do you still consider yourself an Indie author?
« Reply #28 on: January 14, 2018, 07:48:17 AM »
I haven't read the article, but based on the comments, I'm going to add my opinion.

If being 'independent' means you aren't depending on anyone else, then no one is independent unless they write, edit, design, and print their own books, then sell them in their own bookstore.


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Offline Sam Rivers

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Re: Do you still consider yourself an Indie author?
« Reply #29 on: January 14, 2018, 09:42:42 AM »
Quote
If being 'independent' means you aren't depending on anyone else, then no one is independent unless they write, edit, design, and print their own books, then sell them in their own bookstore.

You are right. There are few true Indies any longer. They went extinct like the dinosaurs.
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Offline Joshua Dalzelle

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Re: Do you still consider yourself an Indie author?
« Reply #30 on: January 14, 2018, 11:03:40 AM »
Given who the author of the article is I would expect the hard anti-KU slant, but those that publish exclusively with Amazon via KDP are still "independent" of contracts, deadlines, editorial choices, and any number of other decisions that get taken out of your hands when you sign the rights of your IP over to a publisher. Amazon is simply the distributor in this equation.


I also don't agree with his assertion that indie authors could kill KU if we all pulled out. As long as people are still paying subscription fees and are happy with the content provided by traditional publishers and those with exclusivity exceptions Amazon won't change a thing. The only thing that will kill KU is if readers begin leaving in droves.

I completely agree with Mark in that Amazon being the only eBook publisher left standing won't be a good thing for writers or readers, but placing the blame on content providers maximizing their exposure and profit by shifting to KU misses the point a bit... the real question is why can't NOOK, Kobo, or iBooks carve out a bigger market share of the eBook pie given that they offer identical content as Amazon?

Offline Lorri Moulton

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Re: Do you still consider yourself an Indie author?
« Reply #31 on: January 14, 2018, 11:25:47 AM »

... the real question is why can't NOOK, Kobo, or iBooks carve out a bigger market share of the eBook pie given that they offer identical content as Amazon?

Thank you.

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Offline Sam Rivers

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Re: Do you still consider yourself an Indie author?
« Reply #32 on: January 14, 2018, 12:33:10 PM »
Quote
I completely agree with Mark in that Amazon being the only eBook publisher left standing won't be a good thing for writers or readers, but placing the blame on content providers maximizing their exposure and profit by shifting to KU misses the point a bit... the real question is why can't NOOK, Kobo, or iBooks carve out a bigger market share of the eBook pie given that they offer identical content as Amazon?

They just can't compete with Amazon so they keep losing out on sales. That means the only ball game in town is Amazon.
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Offline P.J. Post

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Re: Do you still consider yourself an Indie author?
« Reply #33 on: January 14, 2018, 03:30:56 PM »
This is all aesthetics.

Although the term "Indie" is older, it was redefined by the Hardcore Punk movement of the early 80s. Indie was really another term for the DIY aesthetic. These bands had no access to radio, the labels wouldn't touch them and neither would many live music venues. The played shows in suburban basements, backyards and rented halls. They recorded their own music and made mix tapes, that were then traded through the mail all over the country. Eventually, they created their own labels. The worst of it was that they had no access to existing distribution channels - so they made their own.

The point is, they were, for all practical purposes, banned from the music industry, so they created their own parallel ecosystem. By the mid-80s, punk had mostly died, and what survived, morphed into other genres. The major labels now saw the profit and signed everyone left to sign. If you're interested in any period merchandise, Hot Topics is usually pretty well stocked.

By 2010 or so, self-publishing had become pseudo-Indie at best, because Amazon et al had developed the tools and created an ecosystem for us - we weren't really forging our own path. As we begin 2018, none of us are truly Indie. We compete just like any other business, using the same tools, the same distribution channels and many of the same promotional channels. Even the playground of the Big 5 is becoming increasingly accessible.

In the internet age, the only thing Indie means anymore is that we don't have "evil corporate" backing.

However, I do believe, even though the term has been redefined yet again, that the tradition of the Punk DIY aesthetic is alive and well in Indie music and publishing - meaning, we're still very small business entities, and we're still competing head to head with the largest of corporations. And with all due respect to Mr. Coker, I think we're doing that regardless of what distribution channels we choose to leverage - because at the end of the day, we're the ones choosing.
« Last Edit: January 14, 2018, 03:33:22 PM by P.J. Post »

Offline Herc- The Reluctant Geek

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Re: Do you still consider yourself an Indie author?
« Reply #34 on: January 14, 2018, 03:48:16 PM »
I thought 'indie' stood for 'independently published', and was used because self-published had that vanity publishing baggage from the long ago. So, unless you've signed a contract with a publisher, then i reckon you're independently published and therefore, 'indie'...

Smashwords was great for self-publishing in 2007 and 2008, when it first started to gain momentum. Unfortunately, it's slipped a little and I believe has been overtaken as the go-to aggregator for self-published authors. They would be better served by upgrading their website and meatgrinder than slagging off Amazon. Then again, I suppose one doesn't preclude the other.

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Offline C. Rysalis

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Re: Do you still consider yourself an Indie author?
« Reply #35 on: January 14, 2018, 04:11:42 PM »
Absolutely.  I decide my schedule, my release dates, my prices, my avenues of distribution...that's independent.  Amazon has some great ways of promoting books, but I own the business and make the decisions.

This.

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Offline Dennis E. Taylor

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Re: Do you still consider yourself an Indie author?
« Reply #36 on: January 14, 2018, 07:23:22 PM »
I'm a contrarian who resists being pigeonholed. :)

Contrarians of the world, unite!  ;D

Offline Anarchist

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Re: Do you still consider yourself an Indie author?
« Reply #37 on: January 14, 2018, 07:29:24 PM »
Contrarians of the world, unite!  ;D

Gotta admit, that made me laugh.
"Opportunity is missed by most people because it is dressed in overalls and looks like work." - Thomas Edison

"Strategy without tactics is the slowest route to victory. Tactics without strategy is the noise before defeat." - Sun Tzu

Online Frank Carey

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Re: Do you still consider yourself an Indie author?
« Reply #38 on: January 15, 2018, 08:07:28 AM »
I write, polish, publish, market, and sell my stories. I refuse to voluntarily crawl into a cramped hole filled with pigeons. It's just not my thing.

Offline KevinH

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Re: Do you still consider yourself an Indie author?
« Reply #39 on: January 15, 2018, 11:26:14 AM »
I don't consider my independence based on where I sell books.

This.  Until someone else starts handling/overseeing all the non-writing tasks associated with publishing (editing, formatting, marketing, etc.), I'm an indie author.

Online Vale

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Re: Do you still consider yourself an Indie author?
« Reply #40 on: January 15, 2018, 11:51:11 AM »
What's a good place to look to like Mark Coker? In the past few years, I only see him pop up to trash Amazon. The advice I hear on the forums is to use Draft2Digital instead of Smashwords if you aggregate. When I look on Mark Coker's blog at Smashwords, he's mostly talking about how having sex with dinosaurs isn't bestiality... and Amazon is bad. Everyone likes him, so I feel like I missed something big. What's a good source for liking Mark Coker? Is there a write up of what he's done, or some older interviews or something? =/ I'm having a hard time loving him like everyone else. Not that I hate him, just that I can't find anything other than the noise (and dinosaur sex).

Offline Piano Jenny

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Re: Do you still consider yourself an Indie author?
« Reply #41 on: January 15, 2018, 05:06:45 PM »
Everyone likes him, so I feel like I missed something big.

Umm ... not everyone.

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Offline MClayton

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Re: Do you still consider yourself an Indie author?
« Reply #42 on: January 15, 2018, 06:00:55 PM »
What's a good place to look to like Mark Coker? In the past few years, I only see him pop up to trash Amazon. The advice I hear on the forums is to use Draft2Digital instead of Smashwords if you aggregate. When I look on Mark Coker's blog at Smashwords, he's mostly talking about how having sex with dinosaurs isn't bestiality... and Amazon is bad. Everyone likes him, so I feel like I missed something big. What's a good source for liking Mark Coker? Is there a write up of what he's done, or some older interviews or something? =/ I'm having a hard time loving him like everyone else. Not that I hate him, just that I can't find anything other than the noise (and dinosaur sex).

He was the first to offer an alternative to KDP, back in the day. It wasn't easy to publish directly to B&N, Apple, etc., back then. Some required an ISBN (not provided by them), and the formatting requirements were way beyond what most could handle. So Smashwords came along and took care of everything for authors. Provided a free ISBN, converted the manuscript, sent it off to distributors. It was huge. Then D2D came along and built on the platform SW invented - and they did it better.

I do appreciate Mark for everything he's done. Without SW, D2D might not exist.

Having said that, I wish Mark would put his energy into improving the site (and visibility of our books) instead of letting his frustration with Amazon get the best of him.

Offline Guy Riessen

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Re: Do you still consider yourself an Indie author?
« Reply #43 on: January 15, 2018, 06:04:36 PM »
If you own a store front and bake and sell cakes and cupcakes, you are dependent on that location not only to create your product but also to sell it. Does that make you a dependent baker? Apparently, if you believe in blather.

KU only requires a 90 day commitment--poor dependent store owners, they usually sign 6 month, 1 year, or even 5 years leases on their store front rentals.

OMG the dependency!

Guy Riessen | website

Offline Annie B

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Re: Do you still consider yourself an Indie author?
« Reply #44 on: January 15, 2018, 06:09:18 PM »
What's a good place to look to like Mark Coker? In the past few years, I only see him pop up to trash Amazon. The advice I hear on the forums is to use Draft2Digital instead of Smashwords if you aggregate. When I look on Mark Coker's blog at Smashwords, he's mostly talking about how having sex with dinosaurs isn't bestiality... and Amazon is bad. Everyone likes him, so I feel like I missed something big. What's a good source for liking Mark Coker? Is there a write up of what he's done, or some older interviews or something? =/ I'm having a hard time loving him like everyone else. Not that I hate him, just that I can't find anything other than the noise (and dinosaur sex).

Not even close to everyone, heh

Offline Fran Feliz / Cyan Ferne

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Re: Do you still consider yourself an Indie author?
« Reply #45 on: January 15, 2018, 07:02:59 PM »
I'm not published yet, but I've considered myself an indie writer for a few years and will most likely do so upon publishing.
I write queer/asexual fiction and some aromantic stuff under two pen names:

Fran Feliz (contemporary YA/NA): WordPress

Cyan Ferne (merfolk-fantasy YA/NA): WordPress | Wattpad

Online Vale

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Re: Do you still consider yourself an Indie author?
« Reply #46 on: Yesterday at 05:15:01 AM »
He was the first to offer an alternative to KDP, back in the day. It wasn't easy to publish directly to B&N, Apple, etc., back then. Some required an ISBN (not provided by them), and the formatting requirements were way beyond what most could handle. So Smashwords came along and took care of everything for authors. Provided a free ISBN, converted the manuscript, sent it off to distributors. It was huge. Then D2D came along and built on the platform SW invented - and they did it better.

I do appreciate Mark for everything he's done. Without SW, D2D might not exist.

Having said that, I wish Mark would put his energy into improving the site (and visibility of our books) instead of letting his frustration with Amazon get the best of him.

Thank you for your answer =] That makes sense. I can respect him as a pioneer, inspiration to D2D, and a competitor to put pressure on Amazon. I like to like people.