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Kindle Edition published 2016-12-10
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Product Description
Where is Adam?

Julie Raynes’ husband has been missing for six months. Devastated and confused, she refuses to believe that he would leave her voluntarily, though her best friend thinks differently. However, her Aunt Alice, a psychic, tells her Adam has been murdered, and when she reveals how she knows this, any hope that Adam is still alive, dissipates.

The police are also beginning to believe that Adam Raynes was murdered. And Julie is their prime suspect. Her life in ruins, Julie vows to hunt down whoever is responsible for Adam’s murder and make them pay for their crime.

In the meantime, David Gray, a young man who was pulled from a lake by a fisherman when he was 9 years old, wakens from a coma after nearly two decades. Unknown to Julie, Adam and David share a dark connection, a darkness that threatens to devour both of them, in a terrifying race with death.

Author Topic: Do you still consider yourself an Indie author?  (Read 2079 times)  

Offline Doglover

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Re: Do you still consider yourself an Indie author?
« Reply #25 on: January 13, 2018, 11:48:59 PM »
http://blog.smashwords.com/2017/12/2018-book-industry-predictions.html

Mark Coker wrote an interesting article that has many ideas to think about. He implies that authors that put their books in KU are dependent authors instead of independent authors. It is true that these authors are required to be exclusive so are dependent on Amazon for revenue.

They are still Indie authors since they can leave Select after 90 days and go wide. The problem is going wide is not as great as it used to be. So many authors stay put where they can get money each month.

Do you still consider yourself an Indie author?
As long as I publish what I like, when I like and choose everything I do, I am an indie author. I stay in select because the vast majority of my readers pay for that subscription. If I wrote in a different genre, I might keep those books out of select, but I still wouldn't bother putting them elsewhere. I have a few that are on other platforms and they sell a total of zilch.


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Offline she-la-ti-da

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Re: Do you still consider yourself an Indie author?
« Reply #26 on: January 14, 2018, 06:33:02 AM »
Yet more anti-Amazon nonsense. Like Tizzy said, why are the rules different for authors compared to others? I'm independent in that I am not contractually obligated to a major publishing house (or a minor one, for that matter). Should I sign such a contract, I would then either be traditionally published, or a hybrid. Sheesh.
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Offline Piano Jenny

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Re: Do you still consider yourself an Indie author?
« Reply #27 on: January 14, 2018, 07:38:48 AM »
I appreciate all Mark has done for self-publishing, but he isn't exactly unbiased when it comes to his posts about Amazon.

This.

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Offline XCulletto

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Re: Do you still consider yourself an Indie author?
« Reply #28 on: January 14, 2018, 07:48:17 AM »
I haven't read the article, but based on the comments, I'm going to add my opinion.

If being 'independent' means you aren't depending on anyone else, then no one is independent unless they write, edit, design, and print their own books, then sell them in their own bookstore.


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Re: Do you still consider yourself an Indie author?
« Reply #29 on: January 14, 2018, 09:42:42 AM »
Quote
If being 'independent' means you aren't depending on anyone else, then no one is independent unless they write, edit, design, and print their own books, then sell them in their own bookstore.

You are right. There are few true Indies any longer. They went extinct like the dinosaurs.
Everything is theoretically impossible, until it is done.

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Re: Do you still consider yourself an Indie author?
« Reply #30 on: January 14, 2018, 11:03:40 AM »
Given who the author of the article is I would expect the hard anti-KU slant, but those that publish exclusively with Amazon via KDP are still "independent" of contracts, deadlines, editorial choices, and any number of other decisions that get taken out of your hands when you sign the rights of your IP over to a publisher. Amazon is simply the distributor in this equation.


I also don't agree with his assertion that indie authors could kill KU if we all pulled out. As long as people are still paying subscription fees and are happy with the content provided by traditional publishers and those with exclusivity exceptions Amazon won't change a thing. The only thing that will kill KU is if readers begin leaving in droves.

I completely agree with Mark in that Amazon being the only eBook publisher left standing won't be a good thing for writers or readers, but placing the blame on content providers maximizing their exposure and profit by shifting to KU misses the point a bit... the real question is why can't NOOK, Kobo, or iBooks carve out a bigger market share of the eBook pie given that they offer identical content as Amazon?

Online Lorri Moulton

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Re: Do you still consider yourself an Indie author?
« Reply #31 on: January 14, 2018, 11:25:47 AM »

... the real question is why can't NOOK, Kobo, or iBooks carve out a bigger market share of the eBook pie given that they offer identical content as Amazon?

Thank you.

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Re: Do you still consider yourself an Indie author?
« Reply #32 on: January 14, 2018, 12:33:10 PM »
Quote
I completely agree with Mark in that Amazon being the only eBook publisher left standing won't be a good thing for writers or readers, but placing the blame on content providers maximizing their exposure and profit by shifting to KU misses the point a bit... the real question is why can't NOOK, Kobo, or iBooks carve out a bigger market share of the eBook pie given that they offer identical content as Amazon?

They just can't compete with Amazon so they keep losing out on sales. That means the only ball game in town is Amazon.
Everything is theoretically impossible, until it is done.

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Offline P.J. Post

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Re: Do you still consider yourself an Indie author?
« Reply #33 on: January 14, 2018, 03:30:56 PM »
This is all aesthetics.

Although the term "Indie" is older, it was redefined by the Hardcore Punk movement of the early 80s. Indie was really another term for the DIY aesthetic. These bands had no access to radio, the labels wouldn't touch them and neither would many live music venues. The played shows in suburban basements, backyards and rented halls. They recorded their own music and made mix tapes, that were then traded through the mail all over the country. Eventually, they created their own labels. The worst of it was that they had no access to existing distribution channels - so they made their own.

The point is, they were, for all practical purposes, banned from the music industry, so they created their own parallel ecosystem. By the mid-80s, punk had mostly died, and what survived, morphed into other genres. The major labels now saw the profit and signed everyone left to sign. If you're interested in any period merchandise, Hot Topics is usually pretty well stocked.

By 2010 or so, self-publishing had become pseudo-Indie at best, because Amazon et al had developed the tools and created an ecosystem for us - we weren't really forging our own path. As we begin 2018, none of us are truly Indie. We compete just like any other business, using the same tools, the same distribution channels and many of the same promotional channels. Even the playground of the Big 5 is becoming increasingly accessible.

In the internet age, the only thing Indie means anymore is that we don't have "evil corporate" backing.

However, I do believe, even though the term has been redefined yet again, that the tradition of the Punk DIY aesthetic is alive and well in Indie music and publishing - meaning, we're still very small business entities, and we're still competing head to head with the largest of corporations. And with all due respect to Mr. Coker, I think we're doing that regardless of what distribution channels we choose to leverage - because at the end of the day, we're the ones choosing.
« Last Edit: January 14, 2018, 03:33:22 PM by P.J. Post »

Offline Herc- The Reluctant Geek

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Re: Do you still consider yourself an Indie author?
« Reply #34 on: January 14, 2018, 03:48:16 PM »
I thought 'indie' stood for 'independently published', and was used because self-published had that vanity publishing baggage from the long ago. So, unless you've signed a contract with a publisher, then i reckon you're independently published and therefore, 'indie'...

Smashwords was great for self-publishing in 2007 and 2008, when it first started to gain momentum. Unfortunately, it's slipped a little and I believe has been overtaken as the go-to aggregator for self-published authors. They would be better served by upgrading their website and meatgrinder than slagging off Amazon. Then again, I suppose one doesn't preclude the other.

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Offline C. Rysalis

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Re: Do you still consider yourself an Indie author?
« Reply #35 on: January 14, 2018, 04:11:42 PM »
Absolutely.  I decide my schedule, my release dates, my prices, my avenues of distribution...that's independent.  Amazon has some great ways of promoting books, but I own the business and make the decisions.

This.

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Offline Dennis E. Taylor

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Re: Do you still consider yourself an Indie author?
« Reply #36 on: January 14, 2018, 07:23:22 PM »
I'm a contrarian who resists being pigeonholed. :)

Contrarians of the world, unite!  ;D

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Re: Do you still consider yourself an Indie author?
« Reply #37 on: January 14, 2018, 07:29:24 PM »
Contrarians of the world, unite!  ;D

Gotta admit, that made me laugh.
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Offline Frank Carey

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Re: Do you still consider yourself an Indie author?
« Reply #38 on: Yesterday at 08:07:28 AM »
I write, polish, publish, market, and sell my stories. I refuse to voluntarily crawl into a cramped hole filled with pigeons. It's just not my thing.

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Re: Do you still consider yourself an Indie author?
« Reply #39 on: Yesterday at 11:26:14 AM »
I don't consider my independence based on where I sell books.

This.  Until someone else starts handling/overseeing all the non-writing tasks associated with publishing (editing, formatting, marketing, etc.), I'm an indie author.

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Re: Do you still consider yourself an Indie author?
« Reply #40 on: Yesterday at 11:51:11 AM »
What's a good place to look to like Mark Coker? In the past few years, I only see him pop up to trash Amazon. The advice I hear on the forums is to use Draft2Digital instead of Smashwords if you aggregate. When I look on Mark Coker's blog at Smashwords, he's mostly talking about how having sex with dinosaurs isn't bestiality... and Amazon is bad. Everyone likes him, so I feel like I missed something big. What's a good source for liking Mark Coker? Is there a write up of what he's done, or some older interviews or something? =/ I'm having a hard time loving him like everyone else. Not that I hate him, just that I can't find anything other than the noise (and dinosaur sex).

Offline Piano Jenny

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Re: Do you still consider yourself an Indie author?
« Reply #41 on: Yesterday at 05:06:45 PM »
Everyone likes him, so I feel like I missed something big.

Umm ... not everyone.

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Offline MClayton

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Re: Do you still consider yourself an Indie author?
« Reply #42 on: Yesterday at 06:00:55 PM »
What's a good place to look to like Mark Coker? In the past few years, I only see him pop up to trash Amazon. The advice I hear on the forums is to use Draft2Digital instead of Smashwords if you aggregate. When I look on Mark Coker's blog at Smashwords, he's mostly talking about how having sex with dinosaurs isn't bestiality... and Amazon is bad. Everyone likes him, so I feel like I missed something big. What's a good source for liking Mark Coker? Is there a write up of what he's done, or some older interviews or something? =/ I'm having a hard time loving him like everyone else. Not that I hate him, just that I can't find anything other than the noise (and dinosaur sex).

He was the first to offer an alternative to KDP, back in the day. It wasn't easy to publish directly to B&N, Apple, etc., back then. Some required an ISBN (not provided by them), and the formatting requirements were way beyond what most could handle. So Smashwords came along and took care of everything for authors. Provided a free ISBN, converted the manuscript, sent it off to distributors. It was huge. Then D2D came along and built on the platform SW invented - and they did it better.

I do appreciate Mark for everything he's done. Without SW, D2D might not exist.

Having said that, I wish Mark would put his energy into improving the site (and visibility of our books) instead of letting his frustration with Amazon get the best of him.

Offline Guy Riessen

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Re: Do you still consider yourself an Indie author?
« Reply #43 on: Yesterday at 06:04:36 PM »
If you own a store front and bake and sell cakes and cupcakes, you are dependent on that location not only to create your product but also to sell it. Does that make you a dependent baker? Apparently, if you believe in blather.

KU only requires a 90 day commitment--poor dependent store owners, they usually sign 6 month, 1 year, or even 5 years leases on their store front rentals.

OMG the dependency!

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Re: Do you still consider yourself an Indie author?
« Reply #44 on: Yesterday at 06:09:18 PM »
What's a good place to look to like Mark Coker? In the past few years, I only see him pop up to trash Amazon. The advice I hear on the forums is to use Draft2Digital instead of Smashwords if you aggregate. When I look on Mark Coker's blog at Smashwords, he's mostly talking about how having sex with dinosaurs isn't bestiality... and Amazon is bad. Everyone likes him, so I feel like I missed something big. What's a good source for liking Mark Coker? Is there a write up of what he's done, or some older interviews or something? =/ I'm having a hard time loving him like everyone else. Not that I hate him, just that I can't find anything other than the noise (and dinosaur sex).

Not even close to everyone, heh

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Re: Do you still consider yourself an Indie author?
« Reply #45 on: Yesterday at 07:02:59 PM »
I'm not published yet, but I've considered myself an indie writer for a few years and will most likely do so upon publishing.
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Online Vale

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Re: Do you still consider yourself an Indie author?
« Reply #46 on: Today at 05:15:01 AM »
He was the first to offer an alternative to KDP, back in the day. It wasn't easy to publish directly to B&N, Apple, etc., back then. Some required an ISBN (not provided by them), and the formatting requirements were way beyond what most could handle. So Smashwords came along and took care of everything for authors. Provided a free ISBN, converted the manuscript, sent it off to distributors. It was huge. Then D2D came along and built on the platform SW invented - and they did it better.

I do appreciate Mark for everything he's done. Without SW, D2D might not exist.

Having said that, I wish Mark would put his energy into improving the site (and visibility of our books) instead of letting his frustration with Amazon get the best of him.

Thank you for your answer =] That makes sense. I can respect him as a pioneer, inspiration to D2D, and a competitor to put pressure on Amazon. I like to like people.

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