Author Topic: Longtime publishing professionalnew to the self-publishing scene  (Read 5150 times)  

Offline SammyTeas

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Re: Longtime publishing professionalnew to the self-publishing scene
« Reply #75 on: March 19, 2018, 04:25:10 PM »
But as you say, youre in love with the art of those particular artists. Thats what works for you. But that doesnt mean theyre actually the top 1%. Its subjective, especially when youre talking about top tier stuff. Personally, I would give my eye teeth for a cover by M.S. Corley.

Yes, yes, taste is subjective. There's no real merit in arguing about taste!


One thing to keep in mind is that those artists you named are doing literary covers, and while they may be great for literature thats going to be sold in b & m stores, a cover that has a title and author name you can barely see, never mind read at thumbnail, isnt a cover thats going to work well for ebooks. Chances are good it wont work well for genre books, either, which is mostly what indies write.

This is very interesting to me. I don't know where the idea that author/book names need to be visible at thumbnail size came from. It's a strange notion to me. A cover's job is not to sell the book. The story sells the book. And the fact that many self-publishers are bestsellers is proof that their stories are good. Covers are, mostly, to reduce risk. As long as your cover does not turn people off of your book, your book will have a good chance of being looked at. And if the story is good, it will have a good chance of being bought. There are some people who will buy a book solely based on the cover (myself included); but for the most part, it's the story that sells the book. Unless the author name is actually a selling point, there is no real incentive to have it so prominent on the cover. Large type at the top of books is actually a relic of print, where books were often displayed in racks and only the top portion of the book was visible. This is especially true for genre fiction, which was sold at magazine stands. You can see this trend in magazine design as well. 


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Re: Longtime publishing professional�new to the self-publishing scene
« Reply #76 on: March 19, 2018, 04:27:26 PM »
Haha, fair enough. I was focusing on the book-as-product, story aside. I've been very careful not to deride anybody's work. I totally agree that fancy paper or a premium feel won't make a story betterbut it does help sell books.

Does it? Not in my experience. Fancy foil covers did nothing for my print sales... Pretty paperbacks don't a sale make. A fancy foil cover has never made me buy a book, either. A pretty cover attracts me to a book, but if the description isn't catchy/interesting/well-written and the first few pages good, I won't buy it, no matter how nice the paper production value is. Actually, these days, I buy almost no paper books anyway (was a "from my dead cold hands" paper reader until I got a Kindle, too). Ebooks can't be beat for convenience or price, and I think to most readers that (and the story quality, obviously) matters far more than the weight of the paper.

A cover's job is to attract the kind of reader who likes that kind of book. It's a sales tool. It absolutely won't alone sell the book, but if it doesn't do a good job it will stop a sale from ever being made.

Online ShayneRutherford

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Re: Longtime publishing professionalnew to the self-publishing scene
« Reply #77 on: March 19, 2018, 04:28:06 PM »
Haha, fair enough. I was focusing on the book-as-product, story aside. I've been very careful not to deride anybody's work. I totally agree that fancy paper or a premium feel won't make a story betterbut it does help sell books.

Personally, I dont consider the book a product. I consider the story a product, and without the story, all you have is a bunch of paper and a picture.

Fancy paper or a premium feel have never got me to buy a book. Only the blurb and the quality of the writing. When Im reading, I want the physical book to basically disappear, so I can immerse myself in the story. And I like to dog-ear my favorite parts, so I can go back and read them again.
     

Offline AmpersandBookInteriors

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Re: Longtime publishing professional�new to the self-publishing scene
« Reply #78 on: March 19, 2018, 04:29:54 PM »
I only care about extra fancies on books that I already know I like--or a proven literary classic. But if I have two books in my hand and I can't decide which to do (beyond the fact that I"m probably getting both), the fancier cover or more premium feel will not be what makes my decision that day.

And that's me also not only being a snob, but thinking not much of most books, traditionally published or indie published both. Especially traditionally published books after 2000-2005. Something happened around that time that stopped me from having the urge to find new authors in any of my preferred genres.
« Last Edit: March 19, 2018, 04:32:51 PM by AmpersandBookInteriors »


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Offline SammyTeas

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Re: Longtime publishing professional�new to the self-publishing scene
« Reply #79 on: March 19, 2018, 04:29:58 PM »
Calling yourself a snob doesn't mean you can tell great from good... it just means that you know your own opinion and stick to it as the arbiter of quality. Which is what most people do. Most people can't distinguish between "this is great" and "I loved this" and that's okay, because we are talking about a subjective thing in the end.

A print-only deal, btw, is not all it is cracked up to be. It was eye-opening, however, to find that publishers also don't know how to sell print very well. My publisher (S&S) has done only marginally better at selling print copies of my books than I did on my own. I'm very glad I got the advance I did. I would advise anyone offered a print-only deal to make sure they get a good advance, because that is likely the only money they will ever see from it.  But hey, my indie work got foil covers when the trad print came out, so clearly they upped the quality even if literally nothing else changed, lol. (Covers which I had to fight for, btw, because the covers that would have happened if I hadn't fought it were kind of totally awful, sigh. Trad is a battle, every step. Noboby is going to care as much about your book as you do, not unless you've gotten an advance with tons of commas in the check, and even then I've heard horror stories.)

Yes, yes, we should stop arguing taste.

Very interesting to hear your experience. I wonder if the low sales had anything to do with ebook pricing cannibalizing print sales. What was your print vs ebook sale price? And did you have to negotiate pricing with your publisher? Glad to hear you fought for what you wanted. Too many authors are caught up in the excitement of being published and cede too much ground. Good for you!

Offline SammyTeas

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Re: Longtime publishing professional�new to the self-publishing scene
« Reply #80 on: March 19, 2018, 04:35:36 PM »
Wow. I think you need to look again.

The first book of my indie rom com series The Wedding Pact hit #3 on the New York Times ebook list. Part of what initially helped that book sell was the cover. I paid a photographer for a custom shoot as well as a quality cover designer. The book caught the attention of a Big 5 publisher, and they bought a spin off series. Their covers paled in comparison to that first cover of my indie series. They took a stock photo, slapped a photoshopped bouquet on it as well a label you would find in PicMonkey for the title. I was far from impressed and my readers weren't all that impressed either.

Many top indie authors work with cover designers who have provide trad publishers with covers, but that aside, I think most top indie authors understand better than publishers what covers sell.

I'm the first to admit there's an ocean of crap in the indie publishing world--covers, editing, quality, and writing. But the top selling indie authors who stick around provide a quality product that brings readers back for the next book.

I'm conceded many times that there are some authors who can do it better than the traditional publishers and maybe you're one of them.
But to say that indie authors know how to sell books better than publishers is not true. I'm sure some do; but the large majority of them don't.

I didn't think it was a point of contention to say that indie covers weren't as good as a Mendelsund cover.
I feel like people are taking insult to that statement.
That's like taking insult at not being as good of a painter as Repin or Sargent, haha.





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Re: Longtime publishing professionalnew to the self-publishing scene
« Reply #81 on: March 19, 2018, 04:39:38 PM »
Yes, yes, taste is subjective. There's no real merit in arguing about taste!


This is very interesting to me. I don't know where the idea that author/book names need to be visible at thumbnail size came from. It's a strange notion to me. A cover's job is not to sell the book. The story sells the book. And the fact that many self-publishers are bestsellers is proof that their stories are good. Covers are, mostly, to reduce risk. As long as your cover does not turn people off of your book, your book will have a good chance of being looked at. And if the story is good, it will have a good chance of being bought. There are some people who will buy a book solely based on the cover (myself included); but for the most part, it's the story that sells the book. Unless the author name is actually a selling point, there is no real incentive to have it so prominent on the cover. Large type at the top of books is actually a relic of print, where books were often displayed in racks and only the top portion of the book was visible. This is especially true for genre fiction, which was sold at magazine stands. You can see this trend in magazine design as well.

It comes from the fact that when someone is doing a search on Amazon, or sees a list of also-boughts, theyre seeing those covers at thumbnail size. And I didnt say so prominent, I said legible.

A covers job is to get people to click through from the search results to the books page, where they can read the blurb and the Look Inside. And since there are now something north of 5 million books on Amazon, no, just having a decent cover and a good story will not give it a decent chance of being bought.

A good title is a selling point, too. I want to be able to read that, or Im not clicking. If I know and author and like them, their name on the cover can get me to click.

I think you might find things are a little different  here in the indie world than what youre used to.
     

Offline AmpersandBookInteriors

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Re: Longtime publishing professional�new to the self-publishing scene
« Reply #82 on: March 19, 2018, 04:40:11 PM »
I'm conceded many times that there are some authors who can do it better than the traditional publishers and maybe you're one of them.
But to say that indie authors know how to sell books better than publishers is not true. I'm sure some do; but the large majority of them don't.

I didn't think it was a point of contention to say that indie covers weren't as good as a Mendelsund cover.
I feel like people are taking insult to that statement.
That's like taking insult at not being as good of a painter as Repin or Sargent, haha.






I hate to say it but you're going to find a ton (and I mean a TON) of people who think Mendelsund covers aren't good. If someone took a cover like this:

https://www.amazon.com/You-May-Also-Like-Endless/dp/0307958248/ref=tmm_hrd_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr=

and asked for input here you'd get a bunch of comments saying it looked unprofessional and like someone put it together in Paint. That IS  a taste thing, but damn, you're not going to get a great response from the public in general.


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Offline SammyTeas

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Re: Longtime publishing professional�new to the self-publishing scene
« Reply #83 on: March 19, 2018, 04:41:30 PM »
Does it? Not in my experience. Fancy foil covers did nothing for my print sales... Pretty paperbacks don't a sale make. A fancy foil cover has never made me buy a book, either. A pretty cover attracts me to a book, but if the description isn't catchy/interesting/well-written and the first few pages good, I won't buy it, no matter how nice the paper production value is. Actually, these days, I buy almost no paper books anyway (was a "from my dead cold hands" paper reader until I got a Kindle, too). Ebooks can't be beat for convenience or price, and I think to most readers that (and the story quality, obviously) matters far more than the weight of the paper.

A cover's job is to attract the kind of reader who likes that kind of book. It's a sales tool. It absolutely won't alone sell the book, but if it doesn't do a good job it will stop a sale from ever being made.

It does; but maybe not at such a significant margin. If you take an awful story with a pretty package vs. an awful story with an ugly package; the pretty one will sell more. No question. Enough to recoup costs? Sometimes. There a lot of traditionally published books that sell more copies because they've been padded (extra pages added to create a heftier product). Not only do unit sales go up, but unit cost goes up as well. I'm not saying this works for every book. But it works. Or publishers wouldn't be doing it.

Online Annie B

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Re: Longtime publishing professional�new to the self-publishing scene
« Reply #84 on: March 19, 2018, 04:43:15 PM »
Yes, yes, we should stop arguing taste.

Very interesting to hear your experience. I wonder if the low sales had anything to do with ebook pricing cannibalizing print sales. What was your print vs ebook sale price? And did you have to negotiate pricing with your publisher? Glad to hear you fought for what you wanted. Too many authors are caught up in the excitement of being published and cede too much ground. Good for you!

They did print omnibus editions, for which there is no comparison in the ebooks. Also, they sell about as well as my own print editions which were individual books priced at 9.99 each (their omnibus editions were 15 and 25 trade and hard cover, so far better deal for print than I ever could offer via POD). I had already sold hundreds of thousands of copies of the ebooks, and continue to sell just fine in ebook. Print is a different market and I think they could have reached a much larger audience there than I could alone, but they didn't do anything. Most authors get zero marketing help from their publishers, publishers expect them to do most of the promo work. The problem in my case is that I'm already reaching the audience I can reach. I partnered with them for the print rights because I had hope they could reach the print audience better (ie people who don't want ebooks and want print and shop mainly in book stores).  But that would have taken effort on their part, and I'm not a big enough name for them to bother, apparently. They'll make back what they spent on me but I'll likely never earn out and expect to be asking for reversion within a few years. I got a decent advance though (more than I'd make myself on print books in the same number of years anyway) so it wasn't all a loss. But I wouldn't pretend that trad publishing has some magic ingredient that makes print books magically better or helps them sell. They don't know more than the top indies do, from what I can tell (and when it comes to marketing, I am pretty sure I could teach a few things to my publisher, sigh).

Online ShayneRutherford

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Re: Longtime publishing professionalnew to the self-publishing scene
« Reply #85 on: March 19, 2018, 04:45:34 PM »
I'm conceded many times that there are some authors who can do it better than the traditional publishers and maybe you're one of them.
But to say that indie authors know how to sell books better than publishers is not true. I'm sure some do; but the large majority of them don't.

I didn't think it was a point of contention to say that indie covers weren't as good as a Mendelsund cover.
I feel like people are taking insult to that statement.
That's like taking insult at not being as good of a painter as Repin or Sargent, haha.

But youre missing the point. The Mendelsund cover is only good from a certain point of view. That style of cover is good for selling that kind of book. But it wouldnt be good for selling a thriller, for example. So its all about context, and yes, subjectivity.
     

Offline PenNPaper

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Re: Longtime publishing professionalnew to the self-publishing scene
« Reply #86 on: March 19, 2018, 04:51:01 PM »
I totally agree that fancy paper or a premium feel won't make a story betterbut it does help sell books.

Now THAT'S funny.

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Re: Longtime publishing professional�new to the self-publishing scene
« Reply #87 on: March 19, 2018, 05:21:05 PM »
snip


A $50 stock photo isn't going to be as good as a $500 one. A $500 illustration isn't going to be as good as a $2000 one.



Just replying to this one claim you're making. The very same photo shoot and a $12 stock photo from it--not the same pose my designer chose, but clearly the same people and the same shoot--was used for the cover of a major St. Martin's Press mass market paperback (the kind that gets into grocery stores along with just a few more titles) a year or so after my first indie romance used it. I know the photo cost $12 because after the fact I went and bought my own license to it independent of what my designer had bought. She might have bought hers for less using the Byzantine credits system, and so might the St. Martin's Press cover designer. 

My point is this: Traditional publishers are drawing from the same well as indies, and the dollar amounts spent mean nothing.

Trad pubs doing genre covers are not necessarily doing better design, but that's a different argument.


Offline CursiveSoul

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Re: Longtime publishing professionalnew to the self-publishing scene
« Reply #88 on: March 19, 2018, 06:27:34 PM »
I googled Peter Mendelsund, since I hadn't heard of him before. This article was one of the first search results:

http://www.creativindie.com/heres-whats-wrong-with-peter-mendelsunds-book-covers/

"I [author of the article] make book covers that have to sell the book because nobody has ever heard of it, the author isnt famous and has no platform, there is no media campaign. The book cover quite literally is the advertisement and the only one the book is likely to get. It cant afford to be creative, or mysterious, or ugly, or avoid genre conventions. Instead, it has to be bold, colorful, beautiful, obvious, and appeal to the lowest common denominator."

Offline Penny Reid

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Re: Longtime publishing professional�new to the self-publishing scene
« Reply #89 on: March 19, 2018, 06:29:14 PM »
This entire thread has been fascinating to read, especially the conversation about "quality."

Way back when, when I wrote my first book and received 100 rejections from agents and publishers, I thought my book must be terrible. After indie-publishing for 5 years, my sense is that many genre authors who are traditionally published feel more like content providers rather than artists or creative professionals. They're expected to write in a box. Authors (aka content providers) output the stock characters, tropes, and formulas as defined by the box for publishers to wrap a nice bow around (with gorgeous type-setting, a premium paper interior, and beautiful embossed covers).

A quality book isn't about (and will never be) gorgeous type-setting, premium paper interior, or a beautiful embossed cover. If you wrap up an empty box in solid gold, it's still an empty box.

This is, fundamentally, why self-publishing and self-published authors are succeeding. Trad pubs aren't concerned with quality, but they sure are concerned with the appearance of it.


Offline Wayne Stinnett

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Re: Longtime publishing professionalnew to the self-publishing scene
« Reply #90 on: March 19, 2018, 07:19:50 PM »
Hahaha, you a savvy author. Do you think you'd sign a deal to keep ebook rights, with a small/no advance? If the majority of your sales are digital, it seems like it could be a good deal!

Advance isn't an issue. I'd rather have no advance and start getting royalties from the get go, and the publisher use the advance for promotion. The quicker a book moves, the more money in their pocket. But, yeah, I'd definitely consider a deal for print and audio, keeping eBooks to myself. Traditional publishing has the tools and power to move those, whereas indies are relatively crippled in those areas. With eBooks, traditional and indie are on a fairly level playing field.
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Offline MonkeyScribe

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Re: Longtime publishing professional�new to the self-publishing scene
« Reply #91 on: March 20, 2018, 03:51:36 AM »
Where does this artificial quality division come from, anyway? I have published twelve books with a traditional advance paying publisher, and more than 20 books on my own. I don't suddenly start writing crap when I write indie. In fact, I often don't know how the book will be published when I start working on it. And apart from that, you certainly can't tell by my review averages which were the trad novels, and which were indie.

As for the cover quality comment, that's silly. Of course, picking a random indie cover and a random trad cover, the trad cover will probably be better, but we're not talking random here, we're talking people making a living. There are an awful lot of mediocre to bad trad covers out there, and a lot of good, to great indie covers.

Offline PenNPaper

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Re: Longtime publishing professionalnew to the self-publishing scene
« Reply #92 on: March 20, 2018, 05:34:08 AM »

Do you want to know why traditional publishing doesn't do ebooks all that well?


This post has definitely answered that, hasn't it?

Offline Herc- The Reluctant Geek

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Re: Longtime publishing professional�new to the self-publishing scene
« Reply #93 on: March 20, 2018, 05:52:33 AM »
Sorry; I think you're misconstruing my argument.

Maybe my examples weren't the best. I stand by my argument.
I am not arguing about sales at all—I've been very careful to make that distinction. I'm talking about quality.
And I know that that can be subjective.

And I'm very willing to accept that there are some self-pubs do things on a professional level, and maybe even better than some traditional publishers.
But those are by and far exceptions. I know some of those services you're talking about—and price is not always a good indication of value. I know my examples weren't the best. But those custom photo–shoot services, I find, are gimmicky and not worth the money spent. When I'm talking about the top 1% I'm talking about the best of the best. And indies just aren't up there.

I don't mean to be rude, but I'm ready to categorize you in the group of people who can't tell the difference between great and good books; and don't take that as an insult, please. You're by far in the majority—and that's 100% OK.

Ah yes, the classic vague quality argument. Self published books are great but...

Now, I've been around a long while, and I've bought a heck of a lot of books and read most of them. From my perspective, I really cannot see a difference between self published and industry published books. Not all industry published books are well presented or edited or marketed. Self published ebooks stay on the virtual shelf forever, and so it's easy to find poor ones. Industry published paper books have 6 weeks to make an impact before they vanish forever. You can see the most recent failures in the bargain bins of department stores, where industry published books go to die. 

In the end, the only true measure of quality are sales and I would invite you to go and have a look at the author earnings website and dig down into the numbers. They tell a startling story.

I did a bit of study in the subject for a Masters thesis recently and have put it up on Smashwords (I know we're not supposed to post promos here but its free and directly related to this thread. I'll remove the link if the mods wish). It called Writers Disrupting Publishers and you can download it here (the one in my sig is amazon and they want money for it). The academics who were involved in the project were amazed at the extent that self published ebooks had eaten into the traditional industry markets, and academics are the fiercest of defenders of industry publishing because their professional worth is tied to their publications.

BTW, no offense was taken from your arguments and none is intended with this post. I just think the quality argument is vague and based on unproven and unprovable assumptions.     

« Last Edit: March 20, 2018, 06:00:59 AM by Herc- The Reluctant Geek »


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Re: Longtime publishing professional�new to the self-publishing scene
« Reply #94 on: March 20, 2018, 06:04:34 AM »
This is very interesting to me. I don't know where the idea that author/book names need to be visible at thumbnail size came from.

People browse thumbnails - e.g. Amazon also-boughts, sponsored products, bestselling titles, etc.

Nobody will ever see the gorgeous, full-size cover unless they click on the thumbnail first, so the thumbnail is more important than the full size image. Clear image, big title. Author name less important unless famous.


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Offline Speaker-To-Animals

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Re: Longtime publishing professional�new to the self-publishing scene
« Reply #95 on: March 20, 2018, 06:30:24 AM »
A lot of what is missing from this conversation is the appropriateness of an investment in a particular book. All books are not the same, indie or trad. You make investments based on what you expect from return. A great deal of the attention from SammyTeas is about print books. For the vast majority of indies, print is not much more than a loss leader. Everything has a limited budget and for most indies, print is not the place to put your investment dollars. Similarly, most of us are writing genre fiction, often for niche sub-genres. There's a ceiling on sales and therefore there's a reasonable ceiling on our investments.

Often those sales are quite enough for us to be happy, but would warrant an investment of zero from a large trad publisher because at their minimum expenditure levels, the book is simply not going to be profitable, and therefore would never be published by them. Many indies inhavit the same part of the publishing world that pulp paperbacks and earlier pulp magazines inhabited, and they faced much the same type of criticisms.

Offline SammyTeas

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Re: Longtime publishing professional�new to the self-publishing scene
« Reply #96 on: March 20, 2018, 07:06:05 AM »
People browse thumbnails - e.g. Amazon also-boughts, sponsored products, bestselling titles, etc.

Nobody will ever see the gorgeous, full-size cover unless they click on the thumbnail first, so the thumbnail is more important than the full size image. Clear image, big title. Author name less important unless famous.

I know that readability is important. I was being a bit hyperbolicwhat I don't get is how this belief has become fact.
The only part of the cover that needs to be readable is the cover itself. Can I tell what's going on in the image? Yes? Good.

Titling does not neat to be legible at all. Unless we're talking about non-fiction, where the subject matter is what is selling the book.
Fiction, including genre fiction, is a different game. Like I mentioned in my earlier post, giant titling on genre books is a relic of print (magazine stands).
And yes, of course, the same is true about the author name. Unless it's selling the book, it does not have to be legible at thumbnail size.

Like you said, people only need to be enticed to click the thumbnail.
The covers I've cited are better for literary fiction, I agree. It's because they can escape conveying genre, and are free to just do more.

And this freedom often leads to better covers.

« Last Edit: March 20, 2018, 07:11:31 AM by SammyTeas »

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Re: Longtime publishing professional�new to the self-publishing scene
« Reply #97 on: March 20, 2018, 07:51:32 AM »
There are some pretty sweeping generalizations here.

* Trad covers are better than indie covers.
* Trad pubs know how to sell books better than indies.
* Etc.

Then we have the concessions that *some* indies may be on par with the trads.

So... we're comparing several thousands of indies to a couple of hundred trad pub companies.

But wait, are we talking *all* indies and *all* trad pubs? Are we comparing the latest Random House NYT blockbuster to the paranoid guy who just pubbed his one and only conspiracy theory rant? Or maybe we're comparing Denise Grover Swank or Usedtoposthere or Amanda or Annie B (all annual mid-6-figure+-ish authors) to the small pubs and micropresses that are closing down left and right and whose owners are absconding with the profits?

I think we need to set parameters here and define them before there's any attempt to compare them.
__________

The physical feel of book covers generally matters only in B&M stores and for handselling at conventions and conferences. Most indie customers purchase online where step-back covers and foil and heavier paper are lost on the flat screen. Interestingly, more and more trad print books are purchased online as well. A more proper cover comparison would be of the electronic versions. And comparing genre to genre. And only comparing after we determine which trad pubs and which indies we're including as fair game in the comparisons.

How did the belief arise that image and titling on an ebook are more important than the nuances of design? Most of us have tested our covers and compared and analyzed results. I personally believe the data that's important to the catalogs I'm selling. Where does your belief that it doesn't matter come from?
__________

Perhaps the Big 5 and the mid-size pubs know how to sell print better (or, you know, the biases built into the industry allow them the tools and distribution channels needed to sell print that aren't afforded indies or smaller trad pubs/presses). But if we're comparing the top-producing pubs to the top-producing indies in the ebook arena, I seriously doubt the Big 5 know how to sell ebooks better. Many of their imprints are only now adopting the best practices that indies pioneered.

Online ShayneRutherford

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Re: Longtime publishing professional�new to the self-publishing scene
« Reply #98 on: March 20, 2018, 08:37:22 AM »
I know that readability is important. I was being a bit hyperbolicwhat I don't get is how this belief has become fact.
The only part of the cover that needs to be readable is the cover itself. Can I tell what's going on in the image? Yes? Good.

No. That's not true. Because, for one thing, titles often entice readers to want to read the book. For me personally, if I can't read the title, chances are I'm not clicking that thumbnail to see the cover at full size. I suspect I'm not the only one.


Like you said, people only need to be enticed to click the thumbnail.
The covers I've cited are better for literary fiction, I agree. It's because they can escape conveying genre, and are free to just do more.

And this freedom often leads to better covers.

How are you defining 'better'?

If they don't entice people to click through to read the blurb, it really doesn't matter how much more they do.

Again, 'better' is a sweeping generalization. Better for a literary novel is not going to be better for a Harry Dresden novel, or a horror novel by Dean Koontz.

     

Offline Doglover

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Re: Longtime publishing professional�new to the self-publishing scene
« Reply #99 on: March 20, 2018, 09:05:17 AM »
I hate to say it but you're going to find a ton (and I mean a TON) of people who think Mendelsund covers aren't good. If someone took a cover like this:

https://www.amazon.com/You-May-Also-Like-Endless/dp/0307958248/ref=tmm_hrd_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr=

and asked for input here you'd get a bunch of comments saying it looked unprofessional and like someone put it together in Paint. That IS  a taste thing, but damn, you're not going to get a great response from the public in general.
I haven't read this whole thread and have no idea what a Mendelsund cover is, but that one you linked to is probably the worst I've ever seen. It's awful; it says nothing, it looks like an infant school pupil had painted it on their exercise book.

Not sure what the OP intended when he started this thread, but I suspect a 'side' to the conversation. Still, I'll keep watching.


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