Author Topic: Amazon Files Suit Against Book Stuffers [MERGED]  (Read 49902 times)  

Online MClayton

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Re: Amazon Files Suit Against Book Stuffers [MERGED]
« Reply #800 on: April 14, 2018, 07:45:43 AM »
I came into this thread thinking I had a clear idea of what "bonus content" meant, but I'm leaving it realizing it's a very gray area.

In my mind I'd always thought of bonus content as a free short story or preview of the next book, included at the end of the purchased book, clearly listed in the TOC/description, and meant to be an "extra" for the reader. I have a book or two with a short story included in the back - stories I don't sell anywhere else, but include every so often as a "gift" to the reader. I do this because I have readers who've become very invested in the small town setting for one of my series, and they seem to enjoy getting an extra little glimpse (very short, usually 1500 words or so) into the lives of one or more of the characters.

Book stuffing, I'd always assumed, was filling the book up with irrelevant, nonsensical garbage the reader has to wade through or skip over, the purpose of which is to falsely inflate page reads in KU.

But I see from this thread there are many more situations, definitions, and circumstances. FWIW, I don't see boxed sets as "book stuffing" at all, assuming it's a boxed set structured the way a boxed set has historically been structured, with a cover, TOC, and description that tells the reader what they're getting. I tend to see boxed sets as a good deal for readers, because they (historically, anyway), have been a way for readers to buy a whole series at once for less money than buying each book individually.

I guess all this comes back to the situation being a good experience for the reader, which will probably never be clearly defined because each reader is different.

I'm sure I'm in the minority here, but I don't like extra content that's unrelated to the story I'm reading and takes up considerable space in the book - not even if it's quality content. For example, if I buy a 500 page Jodi Picoult paperback (I still love paperbacks) thinking I can spend a rainy weekend reading it, then find she's filled the last 50 pages with a preview of the next unrelated book (her books are standalones), I'm disappointed. I've become invested in the story I was reading, didn't want it to end, thought I had more to go, and then turn the page to see I've been shoved into a brand new story with brand new people I don't care about. I don't like it, but other readers no doubt do.

Until Amazon comes up with something concrete, I'll just stick to the rules as I've defined them in my own mind (which, I'm realizing, tends to align pretty closely with what the representative told someone earlier in this thread - ensuring it's a good reading experience for customers who want to buy my books. Edit to add: To the extent that's possible. I can certainly, at least, do everything I can to try to make it an enjoyable experience, while avoiding things that would obviously annoy people.)

 
« Last Edit: April 14, 2018, 07:51:44 AM by MClayton »

Offline Herc- The Reluctant Geek

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Re: Amazon Files Suit Against Book Stuffers [MERGED]
« Reply #801 on: April 14, 2018, 08:29:23 AM »
And yet, when I had a permafree novel that had a short story and a novella in the back as bonus content, I got reviews complaining about it. For a free book, with free bonus content.

So I took it out. No more complaints.

Sometimes it's not about free, it's about meeting expectations, and one "aw crap" wipes out ten "attaboys."

I had something similar. In a 2000w study guide that I gave away for free I had about 200 w of blurbs for other guides. Someone complained that the back matter was way too long. Some folk will complain about anything.


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Re: Amazon Files Suit Against Book Stuffers [MERGED]
« Reply #802 on: April 14, 2018, 10:44:25 AM »
I have a question for people who know the guide to kindle content inside and out;

Content that is not significantly differentiated from another book available in the Kindle Store
Content that is a non-differentiated version of another book available in the Kindle Store

Has that always been there? And what's the difference?

Offline Sarah Shaw

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Re: Amazon Files Suit Against Book Stuffers [MERGED]
« Reply #803 on: April 14, 2018, 11:26:33 AM »
...
I'm sure I'm in the minority here, but I don't like extra content that's unrelated to the story I'm reading and takes up considerable space in the book - not even if it's quality content. For example, if I buy a 500 page Jodi Picoult paperback (I still love paperbacks) thinking I can spend a rainy weekend reading it, then find she's filled the last 50 pages with a preview of the next unrelated book (her books are standalones), I'm disappointed. I've become invested in the story I was reading, didn't want it to end, thought I had more to go, and then turn the page to see I've been shoved into a brand new story with brand new people I don't care about. I don't like it, but other readers no doubt do.
...

Far from alone. I hate it. Unlike what Writerly Gal says, everybody is not happy to get 'free books'. I can get as many free books as I want, even without being in KU. But they're free only if I value my time at zero. I'm far too old for that. At my age I resent every moment of my time wasted on something I don't specifically CHOOSE to waste it on. I've pretty much stopped reading free anyway- and getting MORE free books foisted on me that I didn't even ask for would just be super annoying.

Offline JulesWright

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Re: Amazon Files Suit Against Book Stuffers [MERGED]
« Reply #804 on: April 14, 2018, 12:51:38 PM »
Far from alone. I hate it. Unlike what Writerly Gal says, everybody is not happy to get 'free books'. I can get as many free books as I want, even without being in KU. But they're free only if I value my time at zero. I'm far too old for that. At my age I resent every moment of my time wasted on something I don't specifically CHOOSE to waste it on. I've pretty much stopped reading free anyway- and getting MORE free books foisted on me that I didn't even ask for would just be super annoying.

I agree.

Free books are everywhere.  You can get tons of them right on Amazon. I also read many free classics at Gutenberg, which is awesome. Then there are all the newsletters, facebook groups, etc. that advertise free books.

Also, in KU you can read as much as you want for the monthly fee, so no book you are getting in KU is free.  You can read as many of them as you want.

I just want books to be labeled clearly, they are either one or multiple books.  If it's one with bonus content then no I don't exactly know what I am getting, or how much of the file is really the main book that is being advertised.  If it's a clearly marked boxset and I get 6 novels to read, that's awesome.

If you want to give readers multiple books, to give them more books to show appreciation for your readers and/or as a marketing tool to expose them to more of your work, instead of bonus content you can:

- Link to your other books that are in KU in the back of your book
- Bundle books into a clearly labeled box set
- Give away a starter library of books as an incentive to join your mailing list

In all 3 cases above you know what you are getting

And I did note that having to disclose there was bonus content was an improvement over what there was without the disclosure.
« Last Edit: April 14, 2018, 12:58:42 PM by JulesWright »

Online PhoenixS

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Re: Amazon Files Suit Against Book Stuffers [MERGED]
« Reply #805 on: April 14, 2018, 01:00:31 PM »
I have a question for people who know the guide to kindle content inside and out;

Content that is not significantly differentiated from another book available in the Kindle Store
Content that is a non-differentiated version of another book available in the Kindle Store

Has that always been there? And what's the difference?

Because we had the same arguments around whether it was OK to split novels up in KU1 -- before Amazon responded clearly to the practice and the proliferation of scamlets by dropping KU2 on the community -- that section of the guidelines was copy/pasted in this thread by EAW on Jan 3, 2015. So the wording has been around a while.
http://www.kboards.com/index.php/topic,205837.msg2866736.html#msg2866736

Still, when the hammer finally came down on another practice (around box sets) that had been in the TOS for a couple of years, those caught were all yelling foul and pointing at the "new rule" as being the cause of all their woes -- only it wasn't new. Just the concerted enforcement of it was. And perhaps the way authors/publishers were forced to interpret it at last.

Offline Becca Mills

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Re: Amazon Files Suit Against Book Stuffers [MERGED]
« Reply #806 on: April 14, 2018, 04:21:32 PM »
that section of the guidelines was copy/pasted in this thread by EAW on Jan 3, 2015. So the wording has been around a while.

I found it quoted here in October 2013. So the language predates KU stuffing by a good bit.

Offline RPatton

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Re: Amazon Files Suit Against Book Stuffers [MERGED]
« Reply #807 on: April 14, 2018, 07:38:40 PM »
Just a quick reminder that individual views and opinions are not representative of an entire population. Just because you like or dislike A doesn't mean the demographic does. There's a reason valid and well-worded surveys not filled with push questions strive to find a sample size that accurately represents the population they want data from.

Considering that every survey I've put out, where I have specifically asked about bonus content and defining it as a single additional novel published more than a year earlier, less than 4% (Last one was around 3.94% or 3.97% - can't remember) of respondents said they would be disappointed. Granted, these surveys consist of readers on my newsletter and of those who respond. I can't say for sure that readers don't mind bonus content, but what I can say is that the readers who are most likely to respond to a survey don't mind a single bonus novel from a blacklist.

And just to add something anecdotally, I received about 10 individual emails specifically pertaining to that question. Know what the readers told me? They loved the chance to try an earlier book that they might not have taken a chance on because they've been disappointed in the past with earlier works from authors.

I'm not in KU and only include a chapter or 2 from the next book in the series or a book similar if it's the last book in the series. However, the responses I got made me consider the possibility of adding that very first novel to the back of some upcoming releases for a limited time. (Basically do it as a Pre-order and get a free copy of TITLE.)

As someone who honestly has no horse in this race from a page read perspective, there's a whole lot of blinders being worn on both sides. People are seeing what they want to see and reading what they expect to read instead of stepping back and dissecting the phrasing of the TOS in a plain-text reading. Don't apply your personal definitions to the words, instead seek out definitions as defined by the originator of the TOS (this is difficult because it's Amazon, but that email to Shelly is probably the closest you are going to get to definitions.

This is an emotional topic and any criticism of either side can be taken personally (and yes, some are, but a lot aren't even though the responses to those criticisms implies personal attacks flying amok from both sides.) In order to actually have a discussion about this there has to be the willingness to compromise, to take a breath and say, 'maybe my view isn't the 100% right view'. The little bit of discussion that is happening is lost among the shouts of name callings and, well, I'm going to say it, childish stubbornness in refusing to acknowledge that there are nuances and layers to this topic that can't easily put into a nice and tidy box.

Offline Ann in Arlington

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Re: Amazon Files Suit Against Book Stuffers [MERGED]
« Reply #808 on: April 15, 2018, 05:00:27 AM »
FWIW, as a reader, I don't like there to be much of anything 'extra' at the back of a book. If there is, 19 times out of 20 I don't read it. The 20th time, I might skim it if it's something useful like a historical note.

If it's an 'extra book' or 'sample chapter' I absolutely do NOT read it. Especially sample chapters! :o Might just be me, but stuff sticks in my head. If I read that sample chapter and then later am looking at the actual book and check the 'look inside' I might think I've already read it. And then I won't buy it.

See: for me, I don't 'binge read' series. I prefer to read other things in between. So I'm not interested in reading the next book right after having finished this one.

All that said, I'm not subscribed to KU. I was for a while, but wasn't finding enough books of the quality and type I wanted to read for me to justify the costs. If I think about it I'll get books through KOLL or Prime reading but most of what I've read lately are moderately priced books I purchase, or things I borrow from the library.

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Online GeneDoucette

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Re: Amazon Files Suit Against Book Stuffers [MERGED]
« Reply #809 on: April 15, 2018, 09:37:24 AM »
i think there is an actual discomfort/discontent with getting to the end of the novel and seeing the Kindle % has only reached 19% or whatever. The idea that there's that much more left of the story must (I imagine) lead to a lot of annoyance, if not complaints to Amazon and/or bad reviews. I know I get annoyed when I think I have a % left and it turns out the last 10% of what I thought was story was the bibliography, or an interview with the author or something.

Offline David VanDyke

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Re: Amazon Files Suit Against Book Stuffers [MERGED]
« Reply #810 on: April 15, 2018, 10:00:50 AM »


See: for me, I don't 'binge read' series. I prefer to read other things in between. So I'm not interested in reading the next book right after having finished this one.


I think you're the anomaly in genre fiction, which in this day and age is based around binge reading.


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Offline Jena H

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Re: Amazon Files Suit Against Book Stuffers [MERGED]
« Reply #811 on: April 15, 2018, 10:08:36 AM »
FWIW, as a reader, I don't like there to be much of anything 'extra' at the back of a book. If there is, 19 times out of 20 I don't read it. The 20th time, I might skim it if it's something useful like a historical note.

If it's an 'extra book' or 'sample chapter' I absolutely do NOT read it. Especially sample chapters! :o Might just be me, but stuff sticks in my head. If I read that sample chapter and then later am looking at the actual book and check the 'look inside' I might think I've already read it. And then I won't buy it.

See: for me, I don't 'binge read' series. I prefer to read other things in between. So I'm not interested in reading the next book right after having finished this one.

All that said, I'm not subscribed to KU. I was for a while, but wasn't finding enough books of the quality and type I wanted to read for me to justify the costs. If I think about it I'll get books through KOLL or Prime reading but most of what I've read lately are moderately priced books I purchase, or things I borrow from the library.

This is me.  ^^^


I think you're the anomaly in genre fiction, which in this day and age is based around binge reading.

Since I'm with Ann, I'm part of the 'anomaly' too.  Maybe many people are used to the binge thing (tv, reading, etc.), but there definitely those of us who are NOT part of that group.
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Offline loonlover

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Re: Amazon Files Suit Against Book Stuffers [MERGED]
« Reply #812 on: April 15, 2018, 10:31:58 AM »
I think you're the anomaly in genre fiction, which in this day and age is based around binge reading.

Count me as an anomaly also, then as I agree with Ann and Jena H on not binge reading or reading sample chapters. I also am not happy when I get to say the 85% mark and the book is finished when I thought I had much longer to enjoy the characters in that particular story.

Offline Jena H

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Re: Amazon Files Suit Against Book Stuffers [MERGED]
« Reply #813 on: April 15, 2018, 11:56:18 AM »
Count me as an anomaly also, then as I agree with Ann and Jena H on not binge reading or reading sample chapters. I also am not happy when I get to say the 85% mark and the book is finished when I thought I had much longer to enjoy the characters in that particular story.

This happened to me just yesterday, with a physical book. Based on where my bookmark was, I knew there should be another 15-20 pages left for me to enjoy.  I expected an exciting denouement in which the killer raged, ran amok, threatened the MCs when cornered, etc.  But the book ended weakly in three pages, and the remaining 12-15 pages were full of stuff that didn't interest me, including a chapter from another book from the same author.  It was disappointing.


ETA:  In another post on this thread I responded to someone likening the "bonus material" to more songs on Spotify or shows on Netflix.  Regarding Netflix I said that if I sit down expecting a 2.5 hour movie, I would not be pleased if the main attraction ended after 45 minutes, and the remainder of the time is just stuff that I didn't ask for or want.
« Last Edit: April 15, 2018, 11:58:44 AM by Jena H »
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Re: Amazon Files Suit Against Book Stuffers [MERGED]
« Reply #814 on: April 15, 2018, 12:07:40 PM »
i think there is an actual discomfort/discontent with getting to the end of the novel and seeing the Kindle % has only reached 19% or whatever. The idea that there's that much more left of the story must (I imagine) lead to a lot of annoyance, if not complaints to Amazon and/or bad reviews. I know I get annoyed when I think I have a % left and it turns out the last 10% of what I thought was story was the bibliography, or an interview with the author or something.

👆🏻Yep, me too.
As a reader, the only bonus content that doesn't feel like gratuitous padding to me is a chapter or two of the next book or a book in a new series by the same author as teaser content. At the very least, the book actually being bought/ku-borrowed ought to be 80%+ of the content or it feels like a bait and switch. Yeah, that's an arbitrary number based on personal preference but Zon could/should stipulate that the book being sold under the title at least constitute an overwhelming majority of the content.
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Offline Vaalingrade

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Re: Amazon Files Suit Against Book Stuffers [MERGED]
« Reply #815 on: April 15, 2018, 07:34:59 PM »
Here's the real question though:

Would you have even considered putting a free extra book at the back of your book if there wasn't a nonsense pay-per-page system in place instead of just selling your book?

Not even questioning the ethicality of the thing, but are you really that generous as to give away a whole extra book? Permafree makes sense because loss leaders are a thing, but what benefit is there in giving away a book after the reader is invested in the series already?

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Offline RPatton

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Re: Amazon Files Suit Against Book Stuffers [MERGED]
« Reply #816 on: April 15, 2018, 07:50:07 PM »
Here's the real question though:

Would you have even considered putting a free extra book at the back of your book if there wasn't a nonsense pay-per-page system in place instead of just selling your book?

Not even questioning the ethicality of the thing, but are you really that generous as to give away a whole extra book? Permafree makes sense because loss leaders are a thing, but what benefit is there in giving away a book after the reader is invested in the series already?

Thank you. This is a great question.

I for one am of the belief that if you want to read a book, you need to buy that puppy. I might have a permafree, but that is offset by the buy-through of the rest of the books in the series (and only because there are 5 books in the series, less than 5 and I struggle with the idea of giving that first one away for free, I'll discount, price it lower than the rest, but giving it away for free sort of annoys me).

However, based on a reader survey, I am considering including a "bonus" book for pre-orders (basically keeping that pre-order file with the bonus content available for a few days after launch and then stripping it out). So. in answer, yes, I might. (And this is someone whose books aren't in KU). If I do it and see no noticeable difference, then I probably wouldn't do it again. If I do notice a difference, than I might consider including bonus content under very specific conditions (pre-orders).


Offline Puddleduck

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Re: Amazon Files Suit Against Book Stuffers [MERGED]
« Reply #817 on: April 16, 2018, 06:33:34 AM »
However, based on a reader survey, I am considering including a "bonus" book for pre-orders (basically keeping that pre-order file with the bonus content available for a few days after launch and then stripping it out).

Just as a sort of aside, this might be a problem. If you advertise a preorder with the bonus book and someone buys it partly because of that, then if they don't download the book for those few days, so they don't get the book, they could be annoyed and even return it. Also, I don't know about you, but when I see there's an "update" to a book I've purchased, I usually download it, assuming that the author has made typo corrections or in some other way has improved the book, so if I haven't read it yet, I want to read the best, most updated version I can. If I updated a book I'd purchased only to discover that all the "update" was was the removal of part of the book that had made me purchase it in the first place, I'd be very miffed. It's a bit of a bait-and-switch, from the reader's perspective.

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Re: Amazon Files Suit Against Book Stuffers [MERGED]
« Reply #818 on: April 16, 2018, 06:39:33 AM »
Just as a sort of aside, this might be a problem. If you advertise a preorder with the bonus book and someone buys it partly because of that, then if they don't download the book for those few days, so they don't get the book, they could be annoyed and even return it. Also, I don't know about you, but when I see there's an "update" to a book I've purchased, I usually download it, assuming that the author has made typo corrections or in some other way has improved the book, so if I haven't read it yet, I want to read the best, most updated version I can. If I updated a book I'd purchased only to discover that all the "update" was was the removal of part of the book that had made me purchase it in the first place, I'd be very miffed. It's a bit of a bait-and-switch, from the reader's perspective.
Yeah, it's one of those things Amazon really doesn't have a good mechanism for. One could avoid that problem by starting with one edition, unpublishing it (readers who'd already bought could still download) and then  publishing without the bonus book under a different ASIN. (That has the potential to split the reviews, though if reviewers of the first product are influenced by the bonus book, maybe the reviews should be split.


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Offline RPatton

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Re: Amazon Files Suit Against Book Stuffers [MERGED]
« Reply #819 on: April 16, 2018, 07:51:32 AM »
Just as a sort of aside, this might be a problem.

Good news, I can cross something off my list. Bad news, I didn't even think about it.

However, to go back to the original question at hand about including bonus content if there is no compensation for it. Yes, I would consider including bonus content under very specific and limited conditions.

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Re: Amazon Files Suit Against Book Stuffers [MERGED]
« Reply #820 on: April 17, 2018, 09:43:31 PM »
We recently had a thread where a content wholesaler disclosed some details of their business in http://www.kboards.com/index.php/topic,262612.msg3653213.html#msg3653213
and a followup post a couple of comments down from that.

Now, I do not know this particular poster or any of the details around their particular transactions or the use to which they put their purchases. I am simply looking at the tactic laid out and extrapolating from there...

So, if I were going to stuff and wanted new and exclusive content to pop into my new titles, but didn't want to pay even $100 per 10,000 words (a penny per word), I could simply buy a catalog of stories/books for $20-30 each, stuff 10 or 15 into 6-8 new books I've had freshly ghostwritten at a penny a word (paying, in essence, less than $600 total per new stuffed title for exclusive 'used' and new content), then market (and incentivize and/or bot) them heavily for 60 days. After 60 days, I'd pull the bonus content from the books, and then reuse it in newly ghostwritten books. I would, of course, be sure that the ghostwritten material had a minimal HEA so I could pass the title off as romance in the lists, but I wouldn't worry too much about whether the bonus stuffing was erotica or erom, especially since erotica can be purchased cheap.

Or maybe I'm a broker of such catalogs, purchasing words at 20% on the penny, and selling to other publishers who don't have the time or inclination to find catalogs of content to buy. I could double or triple my ROI per transaction. And while the content could be sold multiple times, the original author would only ever see that initial one-fifth of a cent per word payment. It would, of course, be in my best interest to encourage/recruit more pennames and more authors needing content into the buy/sell scheme.

Putting aside for now the KDP TOS as well as all the other possible manipulative behavior used to drive sales, borrows and reads, is it just good business treating content purely as commodity? Or is it smart production and marketing -- after all, the content cost is cheap, not gibberish and exclusive to the title it's stuffed in? Or would it do harm to customers or authors?

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Re: Amazon Files Suit Against Book Stuffers [MERGED]
« Reply #821 on: April 17, 2018, 11:12:50 PM »
Putting aside for now the KDP TOS as well as all the other possible manipulative behavior used to drive sales, borrows and reads, is it just good business treating content purely as commodity? Or is it smart production and marketing -- after all, the content cost is cheap, not gibberish and exclusive to the title it's stuffed in? Or would it do harm to customers or authors?

My mind is circling around these questions and not really coming up with a clear answer. I think I'm having trouble considering them apart from the question of manipulation. I mean, if there were truly no shady activities going on, and if Amazon's systems always counted page-reads accurately, then readers would pass judgment on content like the stuff levolal buys, just like they do on my books. Either it'd find a reasonable audience, or it wouldn't. That is to say, commodification, in and of itself, doesn't particularly bother me; it's become a cultural constant for us. Commodified content probably isn't going to appeal to me, but if it appeals to someone else, who am I to judge? Buuut I'm getting the sense that we'll never be confident manipulation isn't happening. Similarly, we may never have full confidence in the competence of Amazon's systems. Not sure where that leaves us, other than in not a good situation.

Offline Roman

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Re: Amazon Files Suit Against Book Stuffers [MERGED]
« Reply #822 on: April 18, 2018, 02:01:26 AM »
I published my last children's ebooks when everyone was trying to figure out if Amazon killed of the whole children's book indie market. And yes, they did.

They used KU to force authors to drop the price of their children's ebooks to 1$ in order to compete with everyone who was only trying to profit from borrows. It became too difficult to sell children's ebooks for 3$ and I had to lower my prices as well. Not participating in KU also meant lower visibility which made it harder to compete as well.

My books still reach #1 spots in the picture book categories on the international Amazon websites but the earnings are so meagre that I won't produce kindle books again and if I check the charts it seems that pretty much everyone thinks like me because there has barely been anything new since the amazing KU2 was launched.

At that time people were trying to figure out how to get a few more cents from their books and one of the "tricks" was to add some advertisements for other books at the end. Not entire books, just ads. Another idea was to sell collections which contain three or four books.

I wonder if Amazon would consider the ads as book stuffing but they are free to stuff their own pockets with the entire 12 cents I get when someone borrows a book which was in production for 8 months and took more than 600 emails to get published.
« Last Edit: April 18, 2018, 02:31:57 AM by Roman »

Offline TwistedTales

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Re: Amazon Files Suit Against Book Stuffers [MERGED]
« Reply #823 on: April 18, 2018, 08:20:58 AM »
My mind is circling around these questions and not really coming up with a clear answer. I think I'm having trouble considering them apart from the question of manipulation. I mean, if there were truly no shady activities going on, and if Amazon's systems always counted page-reads accurately, then readers would pass judgment on content like the stuff levolal buys, just like they do on my books. Either it'd find a reasonable audience, or it wouldn't. That is to say, commodification, in and of itself, doesn't particularly bother me; it's become a cultural constant for us. Commodified content probably isn't going to appeal to me, but if it appeals to someone else, who am I to judge? Buuut I'm getting the sense that we'll never be confident manipulation isn't happening. Similarly, we may never have full confidence in the competence of Amazon's systems. Not sure where that leaves us, other than in not a good situation.

The problem with commodification is it pushes down prices. Now, you might say so what, if thats what the market are prepared to pay, then whats the issue? There isnt one providing it doesnt kill off the non commodity product, which unfortunately it often does. If commodity takes up 90% of the customers/revenue/margin, that doesnt leave a lot of room for the rest. In the book industry, TPs are starting to look like non commodity and the content mills are churning out the dime a book stuff, because to the KU reader thats what theyre paying. Usually commodity is controlled by how many players can afford to be paid a dime a book, and thats where Amazon mess up this business. For as long as the commodity payer can earn so much through KU, then were going be flooded with those types of books. It makes visibility near impossible on Amazon without a shedload or marketing, which probably suits them because they earn back the page reads money through AMS.

So, having commodity books isnt a problem because theyve always happily coexisted with the non commodity, but if Amazon pay more than they earn for those books, which Im pretty sure they do, then the content mills end up swamping the site with those types of books. Its not a problem for the TPs because they have lots of methods for being visible, but the rest of the non commodity indies are getting buried unless they pay Amazon all or a lot of their margin.

Offline David VanDyke

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Re: Amazon Files Suit Against Book Stuffers [MERGED]
« Reply #824 on: April 18, 2018, 08:24:06 AM »
This is me.  ^^^


Since I'm with Ann, I'm part of the 'anomaly' too.  Maybe many people are used to the binge thing (tv, reading, etc.), but there definitely those of us who are NOT part of that group.

Sure, but if you want to sell, catering to the binge is a statistically better bet. Series are all the rage right now.

I'd argue they always have been, but the traditional world always under-recognized and under-credited the trend. Many of the top writers of all time built their careers on series--Conan Doyle, Agatha Christie, Rowling. Nancy Drew and Hardy Boys spawned innumerable imitators in children's genre fiction. Not that there are not blockbuster standalones, but the surer bet is on series.


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