Author Topic: Self Publish With BookBaby  (Read 15964 times)  

Offline nomesque

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Re: Self Publish With BookBaby
« Reply #125 on: May 08, 2011, 02:02:34 PM »
I disagree, Asher. You can count everything. The simple fact is that Smashwords takes 10-15% of all your sales forever. Book Baby doesn't take a penny. Just take an example of selling 1000 books and work the numbers. There is no way you earn more through Smashwords than through Book Baby, no matter where the books were sold or how you do the math.

Already done in this thread - here[/quote]. Those end numbers are gross author income AFTER distributor costs.

Offline DanoJ

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Offline kyrin

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Re: Self Publish With BookBaby
« Reply #127 on: May 08, 2011, 02:32:06 PM »
Yes, Richard, and you have made it very clear in other threads that you think anyone who doesn't do every aspect themselves is being foolish. I just don't happen to agree with you. And what I said, here, is that these companies (Book Baby and Smashwords) are NOT vanity presses--there is a distinction between author-paid print publishing and epublishing that has no "real" expense associated with it. They are also not the fly-by-night or rip-off firms that you seem so concerned about. What is dangerous is anyone contracting with any fly-by-night outfit. That's not what we're talking about, here.

Actually, I said you should do what you feels right for you. Every author needs to find their own way. Every author has a different way of doing things.

When have I every said using BookBaby or some other method is foolish. I did say that I would not use them and I gave reasons why I wouldn't do so. It's called stating an opinion and then giving reasons for that opinion.

I also never said BookBaby or Smashwords was a vanity press. I said they weren't. They deliver on their promises. You were the one who mentioned that there are no vanity presses where epublishing is concerned. I commented on that part and even quoted the section I was talking about.

Vanity presses have nothing to do with e-publishing; they are companies that print paper books at a substantial expense paid by the author.

EDIT: This is what you wrote and the part I was referring to in my post. Maybe you didn't know this but some vanity press operations have epublishing divisions. I had a lot more to say about the whole foolish fhing but that would derail the thread so I'll reserve those for private messages.
« Last Edit: May 08, 2011, 03:11:57 PM by kyrin »


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Offline DanoJ

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Re: Self Publish With BookBaby
« Reply #128 on: May 08, 2011, 03:13:26 PM »
That's right, Richard...there are no vanity presses where epublishing is concerned. I think you are conflating vanity presses with unscrupulous firms that charge a lot of money and then don't provide what they promised. That is not what vanity presses are, either (though there may be some that are unscrupulous). You may not approve of vanity presses for whatever reason, but it is equally questionable to suggest that, because you don't think people should use them, they are dishonest or don't offer a viable product. Createspace is a vanity publisher, as is Lulu, and I don't know anyone who has used them and thinks they are unscrupulous rip-off firms. The real danger, in my view, of conflating the two is that epublishing is already in an uphill battle to gain prima facie legitimacy among authors, agents, publishing companies, and even sometimes readers. It doesn't help the cause for people to think of the "service distributors," like Book Baby and Smashwords, as vanity presses (as Jon specifically called them--he was the one I quoted on that issue, not you). With reference to you, my comment had to do with your many previous comments about each of these companies that were, in your opinion, preying on authors who ought to be doing everything for themselves. If I am mis-characterizing your oft-stated position, my apologies.
Actually, I said you should do what you feels right for you. Every author needs to find their own way. Every author has a different way of doing things.

When have I every said using BookBaby or some other method is foolish. I did say that I would not use them and I gave reasons why I wouldn't do so. It's called stating an opinion and then giving reasons for that opinion.

I also never said BookBaby or Smashwords was a vanity press. I said they weren't. They deliver on their promises. You were the one who mentioned that there are no vanity presses where epublishing is concerned. I commented on that part and even quoted the section I was talking about.


EDIT: I had a lot more to say about the whole foolish idea thing but that would derail the thread so I'll reserve those for private messages.

Offline kyrin

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Re: Self Publish With BookBaby
« Reply #129 on: May 08, 2011, 03:48:31 PM »
That's right, Richard...there are no vanity presses where epublishing is concerned. I think you are conflating vanity presses with unscrupulous firms that charge a lot of money and then don't provide what they promised. That is not what vanity presses are, either (though there may be some that are unscrupulous). You may not approve of vanity presses for whatever reason, but it is equally questionable to suggest that, because you don't think people should use them, they are dishonest or don't offer a viable product. Createspace is a vanity publisher, as is Lulu, and I don't know anyone who has used them and thinks they are unscrupulous rip-off firms. The real danger, in my view, of conflating the two is that epublishing is already in an uphill battle to gain prima facie legitimacy among authors, agents, publishing companies, and even sometimes readers. It doesn't help the cause for people to think of the "service distributors," like Book Baby and Smashwords, as vanity presses (as Jon specifically called them--he was the one I quoted on that issue, not you). With reference to you, my comment had to do with your many previous comments about each of these companies that were, in your opinion, preying on authors who ought to be doing everything for themselves. If I am mis-characterizing your oft-stated position, my apologies.

I think you're the one who is a little confused about things. Print on Demand Service Providers does not equal Vanity Press. Those are two very different things as far as I'm concerned (and a lot of people in the publishing world).

Vanity Press is a negative and derogatory term used by authors and other when talking about a publishing house that publishes books at the author's expense. These publishers are unscrupulous and look to take advantage of authors. Some are even outright scams. For example, you query a publisher who wants you to sign a contract with them and they respond by saying we'll publish your book but it will cost you. There is no positive connotation to the term vanity press. I don't use the term when talking about reputable publishers or service providers.

Createspace and Lulu are service providers who offer Print on Demand services. That's different from being a Vanity Press. They don't come across as a publisher looking to publish your book and then ask you to pay money to do so. They don't pull a bait and switch or do any of the other things vanity presses are known for. They are upfront and honest about what they offer and their costs. They say "You want your book published, these are the services we provide and this is how much it will cost. We're not going to tell you your book is good to get you to spend your money with us."

I



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Offline DanoJ

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Re: Self Publish With BookBaby
« Reply #130 on: May 08, 2011, 04:07:28 PM »
No, Richard...I'm not confused. I have been involved in the academic publishing-realm for a number of years (I am an academic editor by profession), and many University professors, colleges and departments use POD firms. POD, while it shares the aspect of vanity presses that the author pays for the print run, differs in that USUALLY the printing requested is done to fill a demand, or order, that already exists. Authors who have managed to build a paperback following, either at a local bookstore or at festivals, for instance, would have customer orders filled by a POD outfit. Vanity presses ordinarily don't fill that demand; instead, they simply cater to the author who wants to see his or her book in print, but who doesn't necessarily have pre-orders for it. Once again, scam companies exist in any industry, but not all vanity publishing houses are unscrupulous, despite the common connotation.
I think you're the one who is a little confused about things. Print on Demand Service Providers does not equal Vanity Press. Those are two very different things as far as I'm concerned (and a lot of people in the publishing world).

Vanity Press is a negative and derogatory term used by authors and other when talking about a publishing house that publishes books at the author's expense. These publishers are unscrupulous and look to take advantage of authors. Some are even outright scams. For example, you query a publisher who wants you to sign a contract with them and they respond by saying we'll publish your book but it will cost you. There is no positive connotation to the term vanity press. I don't use the term when talking about reputable publishers or service providers.

Createspace and Lulu are service providers who offer Print on Demand services. That's different from being a Vanity Press. They don't come across as a publisher looking to publish your book and then ask you to pay money to do so. They don't pull a bait and switch or do any of the other things vanity presses are known for. They are upfront and honest about what they offer and their costs. They say "You want your book published, these are the services we provide and this is how much it will cost. We're not going to tell you your book is good to get you to spend your money with us."

I



Offline Asher MacDonald

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Re: Self Publish With BookBaby
« Reply #131 on: May 08, 2011, 04:29:24 PM »
"Better yet, if you think you're in it for the long haul, invest in a Mac that will let you upload yourself to Apple."

I took that option and added an iMac to my stable of four PCs and an iPad. I had been looking for an excuse for years, and when it presented itself I jumped on it. At a royalty of $2 per book it will take 600 Apple sales to break even. Only 595 to go! (The iBook sales have a bit to go to match Amazon sales.) The iMac is so great I will be eternally grateful to iBooks for restricting access to Macs.

You can write off some of the purchase, can't you? Considering that, you're probably closer than 595 sales to break even.

Offline kyrin

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Re: Self Publish With BookBaby
« Reply #132 on: May 08, 2011, 04:42:49 PM »
No, Richard...I'm not confused. I have been involved in the academic publishing-realm for a number of years (I am an academic editor by profession), and many University professors, colleges and departments use POD firms. POD, while it shares the aspect of vanity presses that the author pays for the print run, differs in that USUALLY the printing requested is done to fill a demand, or order, that already exists. Authors who have managed to build a paperback following, either at a local bookstore or at festivals, for instance, would have customer orders filled by a POD outfit. Vanity presses ordinarily don't fill that demand; instead, they simply cater to the author who wants to see his or her book in print, but who doesn't necessarily have pre-orders for it. Once again, scam companies exist in any industry, but not all vanity publishing houses are unscrupulous, despite the common connotation.

Um, I was employed by a Columbia University for six years. That said, being employed at a university or being an academic editor doesn't mean you might know the definition and terms as they are used by fiction writers and author associations. I'm not saying you are wrong but you're looking at it from the academic world. You might not be allowing for the possibility that other fields and professionals might use the terms in a different manner.

Here is what I'm using. It's also what's used by the SFWA (Science Fiction Writers of America) and a number of other associations. The terms might not be current because the definitions can change over time.

A commercial publisher purchases the right to publish a manuscript (usually together with other rights, known as subsidiary rights), and pays the author a royalty on sales. Most also pay an advance on royalties. Commercial publishers are highly selective, publishing only a tiny percentage of manuscripts submitted. They handle every aspect of editing, publication, distribution, and marketing. There are no costs to the author. These are your traditional publishers.

A vanity publisher prints and binds a book at the authors sole expense. Costs include the publishers profit and overhead, so vanity publishing is usually a good deal more expensive than self-publishing. All rights and completed books are the property of the author, and the author retains all proceeds from sales. Vanity publishers may exclude objectionable content such as pornography, but otherwise do not screen for quality.

A subsidy publisher also takes payment from the author to print and bind a book, but contributes a portion of the cost and/or provides adjunct services such as editing, distribution, warehousing, and marketing. Theoretically, subsidy publishers are selective. A subsidy publisher claims at least some rights, though the claim may be limited and non-exclusive. The completed books are the property of the publisher, which owns the ISBN, and remain in the publishers possession until sold. Income to the writer comes in the form of a royalty.

Self-publishing, like vanity publishing, requires the author to bear the entire cost of publication, and also to handle all marketing, distribution, storage, etc. However, rather than paying for a pre-set package of services, the author puts those services together himself. Because every aspect of the process can be out to bid, self-publishing can be much more cost effective than vanity publishing; it can also result in a higher-quality product. All rights, the ISBN, and completed books are owned by the author, who keeps all proceeds from sales.

While there are honest vanity publishers that fulfill contractual promises, there are also many that engage in a wide range of unethical or fraudulent practices, including misrepresenting themselves as commercial publishers, grossly overcharging for their services, reneging on contract obligations, producing shoddy books, failing to print the number of books contracted for, providing kickbacks to agents who refer manuscriptsthe list goes on. These are the ones that are referred to as Vanity Press.



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Offline DanoJ

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Re: Self Publish With BookBaby
« Reply #133 on: May 08, 2011, 05:05:58 PM »
Richard, for Heaven's sake...you don't need to quote me the entire SFWA definitions page to explain your point of view.

I did NOT tell you what my profession is to give gravity to my knowledge of word definitions...I told you to explain WHY I know what POD is as opposed to vanity presses. We use POD services in the academic environment quite frequently, but never a vanity press. My academic experience or point of view does not change what the companies do. Vanity presses generally do not serve the "order-filling" capacity that POD's do--and I don't care whether your book is a Jungian philosophy work or a preschool picture-book--the two kinds of companies still serve different purposes. And what in the world makes you think I've never read SFWA's web site or that I don't belong to any writer's associations or groups? It so happens that I am very well aware of how and why you define things the way you do (and where you get all your definitions from). But it is your choice to believe as you do that makes me respond to you at all.

Feel free to use whatever definition you'd like to use, but please understand my point in all of this: There is nothing inherently wrong with epublishing through Smashwords, OR Book Baby, OR self-publishing through a vanity press, OR a POD, depending upon your purposes and expectations. The wholesale warning or suggestion that Book Baby is less worthwhile (more parasitic) than Smashwords, or that they are ripping people off "like so many vanity publishers" we are all aware of strikes me as not only incorrect, but unsupported and irresponsible. My experience with Book Baby has not so far been a very pleasant one, but this had nothing to do with them being unscrupulous, or scamming, or operating with an unfair rate structure--it has to do with lousy communication and documentation practices. Even there, the VP of Marketing at Book Baby, having read the Kindle Boards, will be calling me this week to discuss his displeasure with my experience (not something I think an unscrupulous company would do).

Um, I was employed by a Columbia University for six years. That said, being employed at a university or being an academic editor doesn't mean you might know the definition and terms as they are used by fiction writers and author associations. I'm not saying you are wrong but you're looking at it from the academic world. You might not be allowing for the possibility that other fields and professionals might use the terms in a different manner.

Here is what I'm using. It's also what's used by the SFWA (Science Fiction Writers of America) and a number of other associations. The terms might not be current because the definitions can change over time.

A commercial publisher purchases the right to publish a manuscript (usually together with other rights, known as subsidiary rights), and pays the author a royalty on sales. Most also pay an advance on royalties. Commercial publishers are highly selective, publishing only a tiny percentage of manuscripts submitted. They handle every aspect of editing, publication, distribution, and marketing. There are no costs to the author. These are your traditional publishers.

A vanity publisher prints and binds a book at the authors sole expense. Costs include the publishers profit and overhead, so vanity publishing is usually a good deal more expensive than self-publishing. All rights and completed books are the property of the author, and the author retains all proceeds from sales. Vanity publishers may exclude objectionable content such as pornography, but otherwise do not screen for quality.

A subsidy publisher also takes payment from the author to print and bind a book, but contributes a portion of the cost and/or provides adjunct services such as editing, distribution, warehousing, and marketing. Theoretically, subsidy publishers are selective. A subsidy publisher claims at least some rights, though the claim may be limited and non-exclusive. The completed books are the property of the publisher, which owns the ISBN, and remain in the publishers possession until sold. Income to the writer comes in the form of a royalty.

Self-publishing, like vanity publishing, requires the author to bear the entire cost of publication, and also to handle all marketing, distribution, storage, etc. However, rather than paying for a pre-set package of services, the author puts those services together himself. Because every aspect of the process can be out to bid, self-publishing can be much more cost effective than vanity publishing; it can also result in a higher-quality product. All rights, the ISBN, and completed books are owned by the author, who keeps all proceeds from sales.

While there are honest vanity publishers that fulfill contractual promises, there are also many that engage in a wide range of unethical or fraudulent practices, including misrepresenting themselves as commercial publishers, grossly overcharging for their services, reneging on contract obligations, producing shoddy books, failing to print the number of books contracted for, providing kickbacks to agents who refer manuscriptsthe list goes on. These are the ones that are referred to as Vanity Press.



Offline kyrin

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Re: Self Publish With BookBaby
« Reply #134 on: May 08, 2011, 05:41:18 PM »
There is nothing inherently wrong with epublishing through Smashwords, OR Book Baby, OR self-publishing through a vanity press, OR a POD, depending upon your purposes and expectations.

I never said there was anything inherently wrong especially with regards to Smashwords. Hell, I've had nothing but good experiences with Smashwords except for one time when of my books was in the queue forever and a problem with Kobo. Mark took care of both problems immediately which changed a negative into a positive. Smashwords isn't perfect, few things are but I am happy with them. Earlier in the thread, I expressed concerns about BookBaby, that was it. I wasn't the only one. Since then, those concerns have been addressed.

The wholesale warning or suggestion that Book Baby is less worthwhile (more parasitic) than Smashwords, or that they are ripping people off "like so many vanity publishers" we are all aware of strikes me as not only incorrect, but unsupported and irresponsible.

That statement was made over a month ago based on the information at hand.  At the time, BookBaby raised a few alarm bells that warranted caution. I didn't run to my blog or twitter or facebook to yell BOOKBABY is a scam. I said they seemed like a vanity press operation and I stated the reasons for my opinion and why I thought it might warrant caution in dealing with them.

This might come as a surprise but not everyone is aware of things. Someone new to publishing and writing might not know the same things you or I take for granted. It's not irresponsible to alert someone to possible danger if you can do it in a way that is responsible. Running off and yelling a company is a scam without proof is irresponsible. It can also get you sued. People, myself included, expressed concerns. The following post I made on the same day said

Quote
I'm not saying Bookbaby is a scam but I put it in the same category as all those businesses that have popped up looking for ways to part a writer from their money.

I still stand by making both statements considering the information I had at the time. Businesses want to make money. There is nothing wrong with that but sometimes newer entries into a field can have issues that established businesses do not. As for my opinion about Smashwords and BookBaby, it's one I am entitled to. At this time, I think Smashwords is a better deal in the short and long term for the way I do things.

My experience with Book Baby has not so far been a very pleasant one, but this had nothing to do with them being unscrupulous, or scamming, or operating with an unfair rate structure--it has to do with lousy communication and documentation practices. Even there, the VP of Marketing at Book Baby, having read the Kindle Boards, will be calling me this week to discuss his displeasure with my experience (not something I think an unscrupulous company would do).

Again, no one recently has called them unscrupulous. It's those lousy documentation practices that led to people having concerns about them. If you want to dwell in the past by quoting things from four pages and thirty days ago, please do so but things change. What people thought a month ago may not be the same as what they think today. The thread and people's opinions have evolved.


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Offline Monique

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Re: Self Publish With BookBaby
« Reply #135 on: May 08, 2011, 05:47:20 PM »
Fire bad. Tree pretty.

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Offline kyrin

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Re: Self Publish With BookBaby
« Reply #136 on: May 08, 2011, 05:51:42 PM »
No Kill I

((Been wanting to use that Trek quote for a while))


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Offline Monique

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Re: Self Publish With BookBaby
« Reply #137 on: May 08, 2011, 06:04:17 PM »
:)

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Offline Emeline Danvers

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Re: Self Publish With BookBaby
« Reply #138 on: May 08, 2011, 06:06:36 PM »
Their very basic service, to convert a book and then upload it to the main 3 distributors (plus sony), is $99 plus $19 bucks a year.

Wait, why am I paying 20 bucks a year forever for a one time service? Oh, that's right. Because I'm stupid.



Yup.

If someone doesn't want to learn the formatting, go to Streetlight Graphics.  for $40, they'll do all the major formats.  Can't beat that with a stick.  Haven't used them yet, but I hear they're good to work with.

Does that make me lazy if I pay someone to format my book?  Well, I have six young children, all homeschooled, and I'm trying to write a book at the same time, soooo.... you tell me. 



(Okay, I am lazy, but in this case, I call it delegation.)


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Offline Asher MacDonald

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Re: Self Publish With BookBaby
« Reply #139 on: May 08, 2011, 06:10:08 PM »

Yup.

If someone doesn't want to learn the formatting, go to Streetlight Graphics.  for $40, they'll do all the major formats.  Can't beat that with a stick.  Haven't used them yet, but I hear they're good to work with.

Does that make me lazy if I pay someone to format my book?  Well, I have six young children, all homeschooled, and I'm trying to write a book at the same time, soooo.... you tell me. 


By the same argument, why are you giving someone a percentage of sale after sale when someone else can do the same thing for you at a flat fee?

Offline DanoJ

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Re: Self Publish With BookBaby
« Reply #140 on: May 08, 2011, 06:17:44 PM »
Both valid arguments, aren't they...

Offline nobody_important

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Re: Self Publish With BookBaby
« Reply #141 on: May 08, 2011, 09:58:44 PM »
Why anybody wants to use Bookbaby or Smashwords for Kindle / BN uploads is beyond me.

Getting direct deposits from multiple vendors won't kill you.  And it's not that complicated to fill out direct deposit forms and get the money deposited.  If you ever had a job that did direct deposit, you know how to do it.  Heck, if you ever got your tax refund deposited directly to your bank account, you know how to fill out a simple form.  Don't say you can't do it and let somebody take your money.

Offline kyrin

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Re: Self Publish With BookBaby
« Reply #142 on: May 08, 2011, 10:09:40 PM »
Why anybody wants to use Bookbaby or Smashwords for Kindle / BN uploads is beyond me.

Getting direct deposits from multiple vendors won't kill you.  And it's not that complicated to fill out direct deposit forms and get the money deposited.  If you ever had a job that did direct deposit, you know how to do it.  Heck, if you ever got your tax refund deposited directly to your bank account, you know how to fill out a simple form.  Don't say you can't do it and let somebody take your money.

In my case, I use Smashwords primarily to reach the Apple iBookstore and Sony while I handle Kindle myself.


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Offline nobody_important

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Re: Self Publish With BookBaby
« Reply #143 on: May 09, 2011, 01:18:19 AM »
In my case, I use Smashwords primarily to reach the Apple iBookstore and Sony while I handle Kindle myself.


Yeah.  I use Smashwords for Apple, Sony & Diesel, but the number of sales there is so miniscule that I don't see any point in paying something like Bookbaby.

Kindle for me is the most important vendor b/c I sell so much there, then Nook.  And I don't need Smashwords or Bookbaby for either of them.

Offline Jon Olson

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Re: Self Publish With BookBaby
« Reply #144 on: May 09, 2011, 05:04:32 AM »
Jon, I think you have a misunderstanding of what a "vanity press" is. Vanity presses have nothing to do with e-publishing; they are companies that print paper books at a substantial expense paid by the author. Paying a company for eBook conversion services and distribution (and accounting and royalty dispersal) has no more "vanity" or "press" component than doing it yourself through the same retailers.

I don't think it matters whether it's paper or not. Anytime you're paying a publisher to put your work out, that's a vanity press.
« Last Edit: May 09, 2011, 05:09:38 AM by Jon Olson »

as editor

Offline Bards and Sages (Julie)

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Re: Self Publish With BookBaby
« Reply #145 on: May 09, 2011, 06:10:45 AM »
Getting direct deposits from multiple vendors won't kill you. 

No, but when you are actually selling on over 30 different sites, it WILL consume an enormous amount of administrative and accounting time, which for those of us that run businesses has a financial cost.  I am either spending several hours a week personally reconciling 30 different accounts OR I am paying a staff member to do this OR I let Smashwords and Mobipocket take a hit on each sale and do it for me.

If you only have one or two books, maybe it doesn't seem like a big deal.  I have over 100 digital products between or RPG and fiction lines, so no, I really do NOT want to deal with dozens of different vendors.

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Re: Self Publish With BookBaby
« Reply #146 on: May 09, 2011, 07:29:58 AM »
Does SW provide a single monthly wire transfer that represents sales at all the different vendors? If so, how does one get info on sales at the different vendors?

How about Amazon? If an author has two books on Amazon, does he get one or two wire transfers per month from Amazon?
« Last Edit: May 09, 2011, 07:35:21 AM by Terrence OBrien »
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Offline nobody_important

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Re: Self Publish With BookBaby
« Reply #147 on: May 09, 2011, 07:53:25 AM »
No, but when you are actually selling on over 30 different sites, it WILL consume an enormous amount of administrative and accounting time, which for those of us that run businesses has a financial cost.  I am either spending several hours a week personally reconciling 30 different accounts OR I am paying a staff member to do this OR I let Smashwords and Mobipocket take a hit on each sale and do it for me.

If you only have one or two books, maybe it doesn't seem like a big deal.  I have over 100 digital products between or RPG and fiction lines, so no, I really do NOT want to deal with dozens of different vendors.

Most self-pubbing authors do NOT get 30 different deposits from 30 different sites.

The main ones are Kindle & Nook, paid monthly, and Smashwords (which pools $ from SW direct, Kobo, Diesel, Sony & Apple), paid quarterly.

It doesn't consume an "enormous amount of administrative & accounting time".  If it takes that much time & effort to reconcile 3 accounts, you need to reconsider your business process.

Offline nobody_important

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Re: Self Publish With BookBaby
« Reply #148 on: May 09, 2011, 07:54:15 AM »
Does SW provide a single monthly wire transfer that represents sales at all the different vendors? If so, how does one get info on sales at the different vendors?

How about Amazon? If an author has two books on Amazon, does he get one or two wire transfers per month from Amazon?

It doesn't matter how many books you have w/ Amazon or Nook.  They send you ONE transfer per month (1 for Kindle, 1 for Nook).

Offline Bards and Sages (Julie)

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Re: Self Publish With BookBaby
« Reply #149 on: May 09, 2011, 08:28:02 AM »
Does SW provide a single monthly wire transfer that represents sales at all the different vendors? If so, how does one get info on sales at the different vendors?

How about Amazon? If an author has two books on Amazon, does he get one or two wire transfers per month from Amazon?

SW makes one payment for all vendors.  You just run the sales report and it is broken down by vendor and title.  You get one single payment.  Same thing with Mobipocket.  I just run the sales report and it breaks down by title and vendor.

Amazon pays one lump sum for all sales on Amazon.

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