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Writers' Cafe / Re: Give it to me straight...
« Last post by Crystal_ on Today at 04:18:25 PM »
I don't know your niches, but I see a few things that you could do to improve:

  • Make it easier to buy your books. On your website homepage, there are no links to your books. I shouldn't have to hunt to find links. Always, always, always make it easy for readers to buy now.
  • Pricing at .99 out of KU isn't going to do much for you. I would keep the permafree if you want to stay wide, make it perma .99 if you want to go into KU, and price the rest of your stuff at 2.99+
  • Your covers and blurbs are good but not standout. I don't think changing them is a priority yet. But it's something I'd think about doing in the future.
  • Pick a niche and stick with it. Make sure it's a popular niche. I see your books are categorized in Western Romance, which is a happening genre, but I'm not sure if they actually fit there. It's my understanding that Historical Romance isn't super popular unless you're writing Regency. Historical readers are picky about their facts, so take the above advice about fact checking.

Your packaging is solid as far as I can tell (I'm not an expert in your niche), but without advertising, no one will see your books. If you have a good job, as you say, you should be able to carve away a small budget for marketing. If you want to sell books in today's market, advertising is a must. It's just the way it is. I've heard AMS works well with permafree (but please do raise your .99 prices first).
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KING ARTHUR WILL REIGN AGAIN. HE WILL MAKE NEFERTITI HIS QUEEN AND MERLIN HIS PRIME MINISTER. 





SO THANK YOU!!! NOW I WILL HAVE YUMMY PORK CHOPS AND MASHED POTATOES FOR DINNER TONIGHT! ALL BECAUSE OF YOU!!


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Writers' Cafe / Re: Is it even possible to go traditional?
« Last post by MaryMcDonald on Today at 04:14:22 PM »
The question really is: Why bother? As indies, we have a much better potential to make money (if that is your goal) than most trad authors today. Nothing worthy is ever easy, rightly so, and we have a lot of work to do, but isn't it worth it?

There are a few reasons in some genres. I know an amazing writer. She's probably one of the best I've read, but she hasn't been able to break into getting her books published. She writes young adult and as a former teacher, she really wants to get her books into school libraries. Without a traditional publisher, doing that would be almost impossible. For YA, the school library is super important. It also means the possibility of having your book being one of the selections for the Battle of the Books program.
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Writers' Cafe / Re: Give it to me straight...
« Last post by KSRuff on Today at 04:08:28 PM »
I second bknights (it's only $6 if you book at least 14 days in advance). BookKitty is similarly priced. Both are available through Fiverr and are well worth the cost. You can promote the permafree there and then recoup the cost in subsequent book sales in the series. I also do pretty well with Fussy Librarian. Perhaps you can find some blogs that will highlight your book (generally no cost as it is mutually beneficial). You can sweeten the pot by doing a book giveaway. Hopefully this will score you some more reviews, which will also help in sales.

Kim
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Writers' Cafe / Re: Is it even possible to go traditional?
« Last post by Deke on Today at 04:02:33 PM »
Thanks for confirming much of what I'd suspected...that it's still brutal out here. Maybe more than ever. I suppose the real dream is to be able to focus on the writing and not the marketing, but that doesn't even work for may trad-published writers who had to flog their books due to diminished publisher marketing budgets.
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I had a very bad experience with this service.

I paid $50 for a line edit of a 100k manuscript. I think there were only perhaps a dozen or so edits/corrections. I gave the same manuscript (after the line edit) to some beta readers and they uncovered around 50+ simple errors/mistakes that were missed. I complained and never even got a reply. This was not worth the money for me. Will not be using again.
 
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Coming out of lurker mode to add my recommendation to Roxana. I used her proofreading services, and she exceeded my expectations. If I had to leave a grade, this would be a solid A from a tough grader.

First, whoever proofread my book wasn't looking out only for typos, it also included other suggestions. I'd say that this is definitely more Proofreading on Steroids than straight proofreading. Second, the turn around time is brilliant. It's speedy and yet I wouldn't say that the work suffers for the speed.

Not only would I recommend this service to others, but I plan on continuing to use her proofreading services for future projects.

So you just joined to give a testimonial? And you don't know who proofread your book? I'm sorry, but now I'm more perplexed than I was before.
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I emailed Bookbub to ask them what they foresee to be a popular genre for 2018. They just got back to me and said they foresee thrillers--and especially psychological thrillers-- to remain popular. I'm starting a new series, so I figured I might as well check with them what they believe will be popular :P

How do you define a psychological thriller and how would you write it as a series?

I'll begin answering these questions: It's more about the characters' motivation as opposed to technical stuff (accurate police procedurals and forensics). It's less plot heavy, more character-driven. To write it as a series, you could still have a main character but the story would have to be told from different pov's. I read somewhere that, in psychological thrillers, you want to be in the antagonist's mind as well as in the protagonist's.
 

I give a stab at how I would definine a Phychological thriller.

Psychological thrillers focus and explore the human psyche of characters and all its flaws, with the antagonist intent on destroying the mind of his victim and controlling them to get what they want, or should I day to get the target victim to do what they want. The victim will have to overcome their frailties, dig deep, and use all their mental capacity to overcome the antagonist, rather than use violence, (Though violence can be one aspect) in what should be a mind game of chess throughout.

Yes, It will concentrate on the human psychology of character, but it still has to have a plot along the lines of a suspense thriller.


Silence of the Lambs would be a good example, but there are many others. I'd say it's more of a style than a genre.

I class my Girl at the Window as a psychological thriller. Also, Deadly Journey , and In Search of Jessica. None of them have earned me good bank. There are quite a few I have seen that are bestsellers, usually with the title stuffed with a sub title of: A Dark Psychological Thriller
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Coming out of lurker mode to add my recommendation to Roxana. I used her proofreading services, and she exceeded my expectations. If I had to leave a grade, this would be a solid A from a tough grader.

First, whoever proofread my book wasn't looking out only for typos, it also included other suggestions. I'd say that this is definitely more Proofreading on Steroids than straight proofreading. Second, the turn around time is brilliant. It's speedy and yet I wouldn't say that the work suffers for the speed.

Not only would I recommend this service to others, but I plan on continuing to use her proofreading services for future projects.
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