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Writers' Cafe / Re: Genre question
« Last post by EllieDee on Today at 11:10:08 AM »
My instinct is to avoid gaslamp if you're looking for a large audience/sales.  I remember hearing some years back about how it was going to be the next big thing.  Then it just ... fizzled out and has been quietly trundling along ever since.

I know UF is overflowing and you've been down that road before, but my vote might be to stick with it for a little longer?  Possibly for selfish reasons, because I love UF and read it a whole lot, but so much of what's churned out now is completely forgettable and meh.  I think the genre is underserved in terms of really interesting, novel UF.

My runner-up vote is otherworld fantasy.  I have a feeling that genre may get big in the next few years.  People are depressed and frightened these days.  What could be better than escaping to a whole 'nother world?
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Come join our private WOMEN'S ONLY GROUP on Facebook. 👉 https://www.facebook.com/groups/SUPPORTGROUPFORWOMENONLY/     8)
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Do you still have this?
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I don't subscribe to KU, but I do subscribe to Netflix. To me, what I'm paying for is access to all those movies and tv shows. I'm not paying to watch the movies, I'm paying for the privilege of being able to watch them. Kind of like if I paid for a gym membership. I wouldn't consider the monthly charge to be divided over the amount of reps that I did, or the amount of machines that I used, it's to pay for the privilege of access to the facilities.

I understand this thinking, but I don't completely agree with it. Yes, you're paying for access, but it's still paying for a specific product, supposedly at a more competitive price than outright buying.  We can still buy the books, the movies, or an individual class at the gym for more than the "membership" price, it doesn't change the product's accessibility.

I don't have a KU subscription, but I am a Prime member.  My once-a-month KOLL borrow is truly free because I have Prime for the shipping and my cost wouldn't change if Amazon took away the KOLL bonus.
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I don't subscribe to KU, but I do subscribe to Netflix. To me, what I'm paying for is access to all those movies and tv shows. I'm not paying to watch the movies, I'm paying for the privilege of being able to watch them. Kind of like if I paid for a gym membership. I wouldn't consider the monthly charge to be divided over the amount of reps that I did, or the amount of machines that I used, it's to pay for the privilege of access to the facilities.

This is exactly how I think of it. When I recommend a movie or a show to a friend or they suggest one to me, we'll often say, "Oh, you can watch it for free on Netflix" or "It's free on Amazon Prime." I don't see KU as any different. I have never in my life heard someone say, "Check out this show. After you pay your subscription fee, you can watch it on Amazon Prime" or "Watch this movie. If you watch 10 movies this month it's only $1 on Netflix!"
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I don't subscribe to KU, but I do subscribe to Netflix. To me, what I'm paying for is access to all those movies and tv shows. I'm not paying to watch the movies, I'm paying for the privilege of being able to watch them. Kind of like if I paid for a gym membership. I wouldn't consider the monthly charge to be divided over the amount of reps that I did, or the amount of machines that I used, it's to pay for the privilege of access to the facilities.

I agree with this. I subscribe to Sky Movies, which allows unlimited access to their movie catalogue. I don't consider the cost to be divided between however many movies I watch each month, but as a means of gaining access to them. So, I suppose, in as much as I consider this question at all, which is probably never until now, I regard each movie as being free to watch, having paid the monthly subscription to be able to access them in the first place.

I think that using words like 'fraud' is taking it a little far, but I certainly see the OP's point - whichever way you look at it, KU subscribers pay a fee to access the books so using that service cannot be said to be free.
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I still purchase and borrow from the library also.

Me too. Those who assume all KU subscribers only read KU books are wrong. I believe for the most part, we're voracious readers who feed our habit all ways possible.
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Let's Talk Kindle! / Re: Kindle Watch! -- New Oasis
« Last post by lindnet on Today at 10:54:21 AM »
Ordered Oct 13 (not sure how I missed the announcement, but I did!)
Wi-fi only, special offers, 8 GB
No cover (not sure how I'm going to live without my Oberon sleeves I've used for all my other Kindles)
Delivery date Nov 6th, which works for me....I'll be on vacation on release day anyway.  I'm Prime, but didn't pay for early shipment.
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Writers' Cafe / Re: Amazon yanking sales ranking after a Bookbub promo
« Last post by ilamont on Today at 10:53:33 AM »
I am going to offer a hypothesis about why this is happening (I posted something similar on David Gaughran's blog):

Amazon's prohibitions against "rank manipulation" have been recently expanded to include unauthorized promotional tools, regardless of whether authors consider them to be legitimate.

I don't have direct evidence of this, but I believe the following activities by Bookbub et al likely run counter to Amazon's own goals and priorities:

A) Maintaining a giant list of Amazon customers
B) Encouraging behavior that runs counter to Amazon's own navigational and promotional tools
C) Diverting money away from potential AMS spending
D) Running up affiliate payouts
E) Providing potential cover for actual botters and scammers, who mix in among legit authors and hope they won't get noticed.

We all know that amazon values iron control over its platform, and wants to extend its power. Newsletters, which are basically mini platforms that depend on Amazon to survive, may be causing too many problems, and not generating enough value in return.

Does Amazon really care if Bookbub et al loses business, especially if skittish authors decide to stick with AMS? I suppose you could argue that these newsletters increase sales, but from Amazon's POV those sales might have happened anyway -- and in a more profitable way for Amazon -- if customers just used Amazon search, Amazon recommendations, Amazon sponsored ads, and Amazon newsletters to find good deals.

That's my hypothesis, anyway. And there are a few things that go against it:
1) if it really wanted to crack down on newsletters, it could do so in ways that don't rile up the author community and increase resentment. A change in stated policy ("you can't use affiliate links or newsletters to increase sales") or cease & desist letters to newsletter operators based on real or supposed TOS violations could effectively end these types of promotions in a very short period of time.
2) Customers really like the newsletters, and to Amazon, customers are king.

Just my two cents.

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Writers' Cafe / Re: Kicked off Facebook (update)
« Last post by mama_bear on Today at 10:49:16 AM »
Try logging in from different devices.

This happened to my personal account before, and reloading and/or switching devices skips the prompt. I haven't seen it since.

Social media is no place for your SSN.
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