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Grey Daze: A Lance Underphal Mystery
by Michael Allan Scott


Kindle Edition published 2015-03-29
Bestseller ranking: 167157

Product Description
An IAN Book of the Year Finalist and featured on NBC's Daytime Show, the third book in the Lance Underphal Mystery series is part of a new breed of supernatural thrillers which can be read and enjoyed in any order. Based on real events, this is one of those dark, disturbing novels that keeps you turning pages.
 
Download the sample or use the "Look inside" feature for a FREE E-book offer.
 
It's a mystery- Something is wrong. As Lance Underphal pads softly across the cold flagstone, he hears her weeping. She is on her knees, hunched over in the middle of the room, her back to him, facing the dark fireplace. Something is very wrong. Lance wants to rush to her, but can't. In a hoarse whisper, he says, "Callie?" She lets out a mournful wail from deep within as she turns, their infant son in her arms, blue and still. He reels from the blow. How can this be? They don't have a son.
 

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Messages - grahampowell

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1
The Book Corner / Re: Harlan Ellison's story collections - which one?
« on: October 10, 2013, 08:48:11 AM »
DEATHBIRD STORIES is generally considered his masterpiece, and I'd start there.  I HAVE NO MOUTH AND I MUST SCREAM is also really good.  If you're looking for an overview try THE ESSENTIAL ELLISON, though I am not sure that's on Kindle.

He edited a couple of anthologies called DANGEROUS VISIONS and AGAIN, DANGEROUS VISIONS that are supposed to be some of the best ever assembled.

2
The Book Bazaar / Re: YELLOW MEDICINE: NOW ON KINDLE
« on: February 03, 2012, 04:01:09 PM »
I read this book when it came out in paperback, and I'd say it's DEFINITELY worth 99 cents.  Possibly even $2.99!  I'd say that even if there wasn't a character named "Graham" in there.  Check it out, it's a good book.


Graham

3
My own choices for collections / anthologies would be:

The Deathbird Stories by Harlan Ellison.
Trouble Is My Business by Raymond Chandler
The Mammoth Book of Private Eye Stories editor by Bill Pronzini

That last one pretty much sums up 20th century PI writing from the 20s up through at least the 60s.


Graham

4
The Book Corner / Re: A Question For Men Only
« on: January 20, 2012, 01:48:40 PM »
The novels I read are mostly by men, but that's because men mostly wrote the hardboiled novels of the 40s through the 60s that I enjoy.  But even back then there were women who wrote that style, and whose work I enjoy, such as Leigh Brackett and "Vin Packer" (Marijane Meaker).

Lately I've been reading a lot more traditional English mysteries, and it's pretty tough to get too far into those if you don't read women.



Graham

5
The Book Corner / Re: What is your favorite line in literature?
« on: January 20, 2012, 01:46:04 PM »
From One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovitch by Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, after we learn that Ivan spent 3,653 days in the gulag:

"The three extra days were for leap years."

Doesn't sound like much, but coming at the end of the novel it reinforces that the State took everything away from you.



Graham

6
The Book Corner / Re: How do you feel about sex in mysteries?
« on: January 20, 2012, 01:40:00 PM »
It's all fun and games until someone winds up dead.

7
The Book Corner / Duane Swierczynski's FUN AND GAMES on sale today
« on: October 20, 2011, 02:55:54 PM »
The Kindle version is now $1.99, marked down from like $13.99.  I've read a lot of his other stuff - it's really good - and I've just started this one.  It's pretty good so far, too.




Graham

8
The Book Corner / Re: Unforgettable Mystery Climaxes
« on: October 06, 2011, 09:14:00 AM »
The best mystery ending I've ever read was to a book called THE RED RIGHT HAND by Joel Townsley Rogers (not available on Kindle, sadly).  Throughout the book there are clues that the narrator himself is the killer.  At the end, as he sits and tries to puzzle out what happened, he hits upon a theory that, at first, sounds like self-justifying lunatic ramblings.  But then he finds a tiny bit of evidence, and the theory actually begins to make sense.

An odd and compelling ending to an odd and compelling book, though not for everyone's taste.



Graham

9
The Book Corner / Re: L.A. Noire books
« on: October 04, 2011, 12:21:17 PM »
Some fairly prominent young mystery writers contributed to this, including Duane Swierczynski and Megan Abbott.  The editor is Jonathan Santlofer.


Graham

10
The Book Corner / Re: Looking for Good Western Novels
« on: October 04, 2011, 12:08:02 PM »
There's a writer named Elmer Kelton with quite a few of his books on the Kindle.  I've heard good things about THE GOOD OLD BOYS, but many of them are worth reading.



Graham

11
Writers' Cafe / Re: I almost chocked on my chips!
« on: October 04, 2011, 12:04:42 PM »
I'm not offended when I see an ebook priced like this, but since sales seem to be very sensitive to pricing, you have to wonder how many this author is going to sell.

One thing to remember about ebook pricing is that ebooks only save on "marginal" costs - that is, costs for each unit after the first one.  The book still has to pay off a large sunk cost, i.e. the effort involved in writing it.  I can't recall offhand how much of the price of a printed book is the actual artifact that you hold in your hand, but I believe it's around 50% and maybe even less.

I believe that ebooks in general have to sell many more copies than print books to earn the same money for the author, and not just by cutting out the middleman.


Graham

12
The Book Corner / Re: Favorite Michael Crichton?
« on: September 29, 2011, 09:19:13 AM »
I think I liked CONGO better than most.  The scenes where they're holding their campground against a freakin' GORILLA ARMY were pretty cool.  And ANDROMEDA STRAIN still holds up.

A couple of his John Lange thrillers are back in print, GRAVE DESCEND and ZERO COOL.  Very entertaining, if minor.



Graham

13
The Book Corner / Derek Raymond's Factory series
« on: September 29, 2011, 09:12:06 AM »
The Factory series of hardboiled mysteries by Derek Raymond is coming to the Kindle on October 4th.  The Factory is actually a police station in a rough part of London, where a never-named detective seargeant investigates crimes against the poor and downtrodden.  These books are hard-boiled in style, with occasionally shocking violence, but a lot more compassionate than I expected.  Raymond's outrage at injustice is obvious on every page.

Raymond's real name was Robin Cook, but when he returned to writing after a few years as a ne'er-do-well, he found that in his absence this new American bloke with the same name had gotten rather popular, so he had to use a pseudonym.

There's a legend that one particular scene in the fourth book, I WAS DORA SUAREZ, caused his editor to lost his lunch.

Anyway, the books are HE DIED WITH HIS EYES OPEN, THE DEVIL'S HOME ON LEAVE, HOW THE DEAD LIVE, I WAS DORA SUAREZ, and DEAD MAN UPRIGHT.  I don't think that last one has ever been published in the US before.



Graham

14
The Book Corner / Re: Gates of Fire
« on: September 27, 2011, 11:39:58 AM »
GATES OF FIRE is one of the best historical novels I've ever read, a book not easily forgotten.  I think I saw the same documentary mentioned above, and there was a lot going on besides the battle itself.  The Persian fleet was trying to land forces below Thermopalea, but the outnumbered Athenians somehow fought them off.

I also just learned this year that the Persians had to get a large part of their supplies from scavenging, so if the Greeks had held out just a few days longer they could have forced them to retreat.


Graham

15
The Book Corner / Re: some good deals on Richard Stark's Parker series
« on: September 08, 2011, 09:13:01 AM »
I'll second what everyone else said - GREAT crime books.  Unfortunately I already own most of these in paper.




Graham

16
Not Quite Kindle / Re: Rita Hayworth and Shawshank Redemption
« on: September 06, 2011, 07:13:00 AM »
I know the novella was collected in a volume called DIFFERENT SEASONS, along with three other novellas by King.  Two of those three have also been filmed, "Apt Pupil", about a high schooler who discovers the town's crazy old man is really a Nazi war criminal, and "The Body", which was made into the move STAND BY ME.  Really, THE SHAWSHANK REDEMPTION and STAND BY ME are the best adaptations of King's stuff.



Graham

17
The Book Corner / Re: sports book recommendations
« on: September 06, 2011, 07:09:32 AM »
It's not a narrative, it's organized more like an encyclopedia (though it makes no claim to be comprehensive), but THE BOOK OF BASKETBALL by Bill Simmons is really excellent if you're a basketball fan.  Simmons' columns are up at ESPN.com and Grantland.com, and if you like those, you'll like the book.



Graham

18
The Book Corner / Re: Fans of old-school tough-guy storytelling...
« on: August 16, 2011, 02:07:37 PM »
Lansdale's Hap and Leonard books are all pretty good, but the best by far is the first one, SAVAGE SEASON.  It's set in east Texas during a brutal winter, and growing up in northwest Louisiana, I remember that year (1983) well.  The Red River froze over for the first time in 50 years.


Graham

19
The Book Corner / Re: NPR's Top 100 Sci-Fi/Fantasy Books
« on: August 15, 2011, 02:52:29 PM »
I voted in this list, and I'm a little disappointed that neither of Alfred Bester's nominated books made the cut.  THE DEMOLISHED MAN was pretty good, but THE STARS MY DESTINATION is one of my favorite sci-fi books.



Graham

20
The Book Corner / Re: Open by Agassi
« on: August 15, 2011, 02:40:23 PM »
OPEN is on my TBR stack, I've heard it's great.  His acceptance speech at the tennis hall of fame was pretty inspiring, too.  My favorite line had to be, "Even when lifes challenges weigh us down, make us unrecognizable to ourselves, we can always begin again. Theres always time to thrive. Its not too late to be inspired. Its not too late to change. Its not too late."



Graham


21
The Book Corner / Re: Sea Sagas
« on: July 14, 2011, 02:13:42 PM »
I don't know if they're on the Kindle, but "Rendevous South Atlantic" and "God Save The Ship" by Douglas Reeman are both really good WWII seafaring novels.



Graham

22
The Book Corner / Re: Am I the only one?
« on: July 14, 2011, 12:01:53 PM »
I enjoy a good cozy from time to time, mostly old books by the likes of John Dickson Carr / Carter Dickson, Philip MacDonald, etc.  When I was younger I read a lot of Agatha Christie.  The only contemporary series I read that could be described as cozy are the Bryant and May books by Christopher Fowler.



Graham

23
The Book Corner / Re: New authors
« on: July 11, 2011, 03:36:27 PM »
Megan Abbott is an excellent writer - her books are different from the usual mystery fare. I've seen them described as "psychodramas".

 I haven't read Sara Gran's latest, but her mystery novel DOPE was really terrific.



Graham

24
The Book Corner / Re: Do you prefer to read shorter novels?
« on: July 07, 2011, 07:21:48 PM »
A short one may seem unsatisfying...

True.  I remember reading a Matt Helm novel from the early 1960s that was only 180 pages.  I was sort of waiting for the next twist when I realized there were only about 15 pages left.  I felt the story was kind of foreshortened.


Graham

25
A variant that I like is the clueless narrator, who doesn't understand what's going on, even though it's all clear to the reader. Bill Pronzini has several short stories that do this, though naturally I can't remember their titles.



Graham

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