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1
Writers' Cafe / Re: Ain't No Promotion Like a New Book Launch
« on: Yesterday at 09:34:19 PM »
I'm a Believer. Good luck with your new book.

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Writers' Cafe / Re: Book Launch Stat thread - Day 5
« on: Yesterday at 12:12:03 PM »
Congratulations on the launch. I noticed you plan to raise your price soon to $3.99. You've obviously studied various posts on marketing, and I was wondering why you don't keep the first book at $.99 as a leadin to your second book on 11/2. Whatever your approach, I wish you the best luck with your new books.

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I'm following with great interest. You've been very helpful in sharing your experiences, and i wish you the best of luck with your launch.

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Omg. This is my 7th day since KDP launch and I woke up to this:

Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #983 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
#11 in Books > Literature & Fiction > African American > Women's Fiction
#12 in Kindle Store > Kindle eBooks > Literature & Fiction > African American > Women's Fiction
#17 in Kindle Store > Kindle eBooks > Romance > Multicultural & Interracial

I'm grateful I did the KS run; without it I would have no chance.  Being a debut author, I was failing to understand  how decently I was performing until I looked up a KP scout winner book that launched a week before me and is hovering around the 2300 mark which I understand is also good.  So I guess if you get a rejection there's hope.  So far no paid promo; just a tweet nobody responded to, 1 FB post got 2 likes, 3 Instagram posts and 2 free days on KDP select.  I did however write to several people on Goodreads.
I know there's a cliff after the buzz is over where you go to obscurity unless you do some promos, so I'm looking at my options. But definitely, in my limited one book experience, a KS run is essential even if you don't win.

Kim, anything in the top 10K is great, and its much harder to reach the top thousand. That's a fantastic debut for a newly published author.

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Wouldn't this be the perfect time to launch?  I bet you Hollywood is making a movie (about forest fires) right now. You already wrote this before the fires anyway.  I seriously doubt anyone would see you as trying to capitalize on the tragedy.


I just found out Hollywood isn't making the movie, it's already made. Only the Brave was released yesterday.

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Wouldn't this be the perfect time to launch?  I bet you Hollywood is making a movie right now. You already wrote this before the fires anyway.  I seriously doubt anyone would see you as trying to capitalize on the tragedy.

By the way, who does your covers?  All are brilliant.

Natasha Snow did the cover for Forged By Fire and all the books in my signature. She has a thread on Kboards and is great to work with.

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Writers' Cafe / Re: Book launch stats on second book in series
« on: October 20, 2017, 06:17:18 PM »
Many established authors have good luck discounting the first in a series and getting sell-through.

I agree, and getting a third book out often works wonders. I noticed that the first book is in KU, but the second one isn't. If you don't mind sharing, I'd like to hear your reasoning. Best of luck.

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I have a question for the hive mind. Is this the wrong time to submit to Kindle Scout a novel about raging forest fires?

Last summer, I began writing an angels and demons urban fantasy where the demons are terrorizing the western US by setting forest fires everywhere. The story is centered in Colorado, but there are plenty of references to fires in other states, including California. This is a pretty gritty story with the main character being burned to death in a fire and coming back to life as angel.

I've had the book edited, and it's ready to go, but I don't want to seem to be insensitive to the real suffering in the Bay area and Southern California. Here's a copy of the cover:



Any thoughts on whether or not I should wait to submit would be appreciated.

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I nominated the top three. Xela, your cover is particularly impressive. Best wishes to all.

10
That's about the percentage of manuscripts get picked from the pile by a literary agent. But here's what I think the big difference is: literary agents don't show off your manuscript to prospective readers even if they plan to pass on it.

Actually, what I've heard from a top literary agent is they take one book in ten thousand that's submitted, not 1-3%.  But like you said, they don't bother to show off your manuscript to the thousands of people like the Scout program does.

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Writers' Cafe / Re: Who is your cover artist? Care to share their work?
« on: October 19, 2017, 09:02:56 PM »
Another vote for Natasha Snow. All the covers in my signature are hers, and she's a joy to work with.

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Congratulations, Julianne on the most recent launch. I've been following your progress and enjoying your success.

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Writers' Cafe / Re: Thoughts On Small Time Publishers?
« on: October 19, 2017, 09:47:43 AM »
Well they can theoretically sell my books in bulk to brick and mortar stores. Something I'd find difficult to do on my own, and certainly expensive. Mind you, at this stage it's hard to verify what their reach actually is.

You've hit on the key question, namely does the small press have relationships with enough brick and mortar stores to be worth giving up your rights and most of your royalties for the ebook. I think the answer is usually no, but some small press publishers may in fact have great relationships with local bookstores that self-published authors don't have.

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Let me begin by saying I'm a big fan of KU. It's earned me well over five figures this year, so I'm not one of the naysayers. Nevertheless, KU only seems to work for certain kinds of books in certain genres. Based on your experience with book 1, it sounds like KU isn't providing you much help with earnings. In other words, you might as well take the series wide. You might find more success, and you have nothing to lose by trying.

With that approach in mind, I don't see why you'd even consider KU for book 2. Your current promotion is probably going to run its course in a few days, unless you got a Bookbub, and while you're promoting book 1 wide for the next three months, your new readers won't be able to move to book 2. It seems to be much better to plan for the long term and act accordingly instead of seeking a temporary advantage and losing out on followup readers for three months. Just my thoughts.

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Writers' Cafe / Re: US-readership friendly blurb advice
« on: October 17, 2017, 07:58:51 AM »
SA, thanks for the list of good blurb copy sites. I need to write a blurb for one of my books, and I can use your list for reminders of what works and what doesn't.

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Writers' Cafe / Re: Legal question: is there a public record for a trust?
« on: October 12, 2017, 08:41:52 PM »
The main way most wills and trusts become public information is that someone files a lawsuit to enforce a disputed provision or probate an estate. There is no registry for wills or trusts, like an SEC filing system or land title filing system or UCC security filing system. And even when a lawsuit is filed, one or more parties may try to seal portions of the court record to keep the terms of a will or trust secret.

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Writers' Cafe / Re: Love or Market
« on: October 12, 2017, 02:13:23 PM »
As for me, I like to write stories, and I like urban fantasy, so surprise, I write urban fantasy stories. You seem to have the idea that writing to market has to be painful or at least drudgery. When I wrote my first urban fantasy series, I assumed it would be interesting to only a small niche of people. I had a blast writing the stories, and it turned out that I was wrong about their marketability. I still don't know why folks read that series, but I'm happy they do. I'm happy it pays, as well. The trick is to find a niche you like to write that others like to read. Then everybody's happy.

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Writers' Cafe / Re: Love or Market
« on: October 12, 2017, 12:50:21 PM »
Thanks for the responses of help and support.

. . .

Really, I just wanted to know about people who write to market, why do they do it, and do they enjoy it?  Is it a money thing that motivates them or something else?

But thank you everyone :D

As for me, I like to write stories, and I like urban fantasy, so surprise, I write urban fantasy stories. You seem to have the idea that writing to market has to be painful or at least drudgery. When I wrote my first urban fantasy series, I assumed it would be interesting to only a small niche of people. I had a blast writing the stories, and it turned out that I was wrong about their marketability. I still don't know why folks read that series, but I'm happy they do. I'm happy it pays, as well. The trick is to find a niche you like to write that other like to read. Then everybody's happy.

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Writers' Cafe / Re: Legal question: is there a public record for a trust?
« on: October 12, 2017, 12:32:35 PM »
Most trusts don't have to be recorded with the government, just like most wills aren't. It's very plausable that someone might be a trust beneficiary and only learn about it through happenstance.

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Writers' Cafe / Re: Drop in sales?
« on: October 12, 2017, 12:29:47 PM »
Anyone noticed a drop in sales and page reads over the last couple of months?

You obviously haven't been keeping up with Kboards lately! It's all we talk about, that and the various theories for why our page reads and sales are so dismal. In my own case, I think it's me and my relaxed publishing schedule, but plenty of other villains have been identified. Most of them work for Amazon or scheme to cheat their way into bestsellerhood.

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The problem with writing in a new genre you haven't read before is there are numerous subtleties that the readers will see or note that you've missed. It's like picking up a second language. You can do it with considerable effort, but fluent speakers will tag you right away as a foreigner. Chris Fox talks about the tropes, and cozy mysteries, in particular, are filled with them.

Others have said write what you read, and that makes the most sense to me, too. You've presumably been a reader for many years. Even with eclectic tastes, you must've read dozens of books in certain specific genres. Focus on those genres first and see if you can find a story to write that you would read if someone else had written it. Good luck.

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Still nominating when I get the chance! Good luck everyone!

Countdown is under two weeks for my massive book launch...starting to panic a little bit!!!!!

I know that feeling when you're trying to get a series of books out on schedule, making every part of the promotion process perfect, to where it gets to be too much.
Then I remember it's mostly the books that should sell themselves. You have a great cover for book 1, and I'm sure you'll have a great blurb. Then it's the book that has to do most of the work of being successful. And the next book, which I see is also close to launching, and the third book in January. You're doing all you can to give them a chance, and it's up to them to make it happen. Good luck!

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Writers' Cafe / Re: Love or Market
« on: October 12, 2017, 08:25:43 AM »
See, I want this.  I want to believe it (even if money money money isn't my motivator. Simply money is good enough for me!  hahaha!), but this year all I've heard from author friends are they've switched to market and are now killing it.

I think it's useful to remember that we are trying to do two different things at once. First, we're trying to write something that resonates within us--that gives us a sense of satisfaction. Second, we're trying to entertain other people. They don't care so much about the process of writing and whether we find it meaningful. They just want a good story.
It is possible to attain both goals at the same time but it takes some thought. You have to find a story interesting to you that will also be interesting to lots of other people. It's worth taking considerable time to figure out such a story because you're going to be working on it for quite a while. Good luck!

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Writers' Cafe / Re: A question for authors who were in KU and went wide
« on: October 07, 2017, 08:28:40 PM »
I've seen lots of theories about how different publishing markets work and why KU is flawed. Some of them might even be right, but when you're risking income to the tune of thousands of dollars a month, it pays to be cautious. That's my main point. I would make changes slowly.

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Writers' Cafe / Re: A question for authors who were in KU and went wide
« on: October 07, 2017, 06:55:16 PM »
That definitely makes it easier to go wide!

Actually, Atlantisatheart, if you're a six figure PNR author and one third of your income is from KU, going wide is a lot tougher. You'll be giving up thousands of dollars a month in the hope that you can build sales to the tune of at least as much money per month on Apple, Kobo, etc.

It's one thing to complain about KU when you have only a few page reads, but you're betting with real money, lots of it. I'd start slow and see what happens by moving a series at a time, rather than going all in. Best of luck whatever you do.

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