KB Featured Book
H.A.L.F.: The Deep Beneath
by Natalie Wright

$0.00
Kindle Edition published 2015-01-29
Bestseller ranking: 251524

Product Description

Can a Human-Alien Hybrid, Created to be a Weapon, Save us from a Secret War we Don't Know is Coming?

Library Journal eBook Selection

H.A.L.F. (Human Alien Life Form) #9 is the product of genetic engineering, the union of human and alien DNA. Created to be a weapon in a secret war we don't know is coming, he proved too powerful to control. He has lived for seventeen years in an underground lab, sedated and trained to be a cold-blooded killing machine.

But H.A.L.F. 9 has escaped the lab and the sedation has worn off. He has never been more alive. More powerful. Or more deadly.

Erika Holt is relaxing in the desert with her friends - a typical Saturday night. But a typical night in the desert with friends thrusts Erika into a situation more dangerous than she ever imagined. If she chooses to help H.A.L.F. 9 escape, her fate will become intertwined with his in what will become an intergalactic adventure.

Recent Posts

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Writers' Cafe / Re: Have You Posted to Your Blog Recently?
« Last post by jeffaaronmiller on Today at 12:13:36 AM »
"When I write a novel, I am, first and foremost, just trying to tell a compelling story, with interesting characters, thrilling events, and a memorable setting. Sometimes, there is also a bit of cathartic saturation, where I am wallowing in a particular mood or emotion. However, there is almost always a singular thematic idea that I am chasing as well."

http://jeffreyaaronmiller.blogspot.com/2016/05/what-am-i-trying-to-say.html
2
It can come down to a bad niche. The highest performing genre is romance, I believe. I suppose it could be smut, but that isn't a road I'd want anyone to take. On the opposite end of the spectrum, you have something like intergelactic space opera slash wearbears and paranormal romance, all smushed together. It won't sell.

You can write for money or you can write for fame. Rarely can you have both.
Huh? Sure you can have both. Most people I know who make good money write what they most enjoy reading, and they have fame, too, if that means that people who read their genre know them. If you mean "literary acclaim," probably true, since literary fiction doesn't sell well unless you're in Oprah's Book Club or whatever. (But you still probably won't make fabulous money over a career.)

Genre fiction sells best--it's what people want to read. That doesn't mean it's trash.
3
It can come down to a bad niche. The highest performing genre is romance, I believe. I suppose it could be smut, but that isn't a road I'd want anyone to take. On the opposite end of the spectrum, you have something like intergelactic space opera slash wearbears and paranormal romance, all smushed together. It won't sell.

You can write for money or you can write for fame. Rarely can you have both.
4
I'd love to know the answer to this because I think I'm one of those authors.

My books have never sold more than a handful a month apart from when I do heavy promotion, and as soon as the promotion is over they slide right back down again. According to the comments I've had on this site my covers are pretty decent.

Now of course, the books could just be complete crap. But with 48 reviews and none below a 3 star on the first book, and steady follow up sales of the sequels I feel like have to be doing something right. But somehow they have just never caught on. There are books in my category that actually have nothing to do with Arthurian legends that keep me off the top spot in my cat even when I am selling well.

It gets very frustrating. But then I also know that I am not good at marketing. I know I can't be bothered with Twitter and I haven't posted on my blog in months. I have a mailing list with about 10 people on it. So I know I'm partly to blame.
5
Writers' Cafe / Re: How many words are on a kindle page?
« Last post by R H Auslander on Today at 12:02:11 AM »
My novel is roughly 352,000 words and shows at 874 pages. Figures to 400 words per page on Kindle.
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Writers' Cafe / Re: Free Bookfunnel Give Away While in KU
« Last post by Jane Killick on Yesterday at 11:58:28 PM »
You'll be fine. Just don't put it up for sale at ibooks etc (but you knew that)
7
Four P's in publishing: Product, Presentation, Pricing, Promotion. If you're seeing a good presentation and the book doesn't sell, it's a problem with one or more of the other three things. And just because the writing is competent doesn't mean the story is grabby: engaging and hooky. Or that the characters pull you into the story.

What really sells beyond marketing is word of mouth, and that's mostly story. But to get the word of mouth, you have to get the book in front of people, which is where promotion (they have to see the book), presentation (they have to click on the book, and that's got a lot to do with the cover, and then they have to look further--that's the blurb), and pricing (they have to not click away OR get a subconscious message that it's no good--too high or too low a price for the genre).

And then there's the fifth thing: Is this the only book the person wrote? Or are they writing a book a year? Not really enough to make it either in indie or trad. I don't think you need a book a month or whatever--I haven't had a release for 4+ months right now, myself, because I've been writing ahead for this year--but I do think you probably have to be able to do 4 books/year to keep reasonable momentum and visibility.
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Writers' Cafe / Re: How many words are on a kindle page?
« Last post by Sasha Clementine on Yesterday at 11:52:33 PM »
I have a 60,000-word book that shows as 175 pages. (?)
9
You're assuming that every book that ends up tumbling through the system onto a live store page was every book that was submitted. For every thousand books that go live, we don't know if they auto or manually rejected another thousand. Ten thousand. It's not hard to automate the process of submission.

Until proven otherwise, it's a safe assumption that a KU submission will go live and not get rejected.

10
When it comes to marketing, your marketing plan is only as good as your marketing plan. It's easy to say "just do it" as it's easy to forget just how much learning marketing took. Being unblessed in marketing, I can tell you frankly that getting my brain wrapped around this has taken considerable effort.

IMHO, no book has a problem. The way that you market it, however, that's a problem. The job of marketing is to match a book's experience to an audience that wants that experiences, and then the book gives them that experience. You're going to go wrong if you are offering the wrong book to the wrong market with the wrong experience.
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