Author Topic: So you didn't like the Paperwhite/Voyage, now what? The solutions thread  (Read 75954 times)  

Offline NightGoat

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Re: So you didn't like the Paperwhite, now what? The solutions thread
« Reply #100 on: July 23, 2013, 06:31:29 pm »
Wow I was surprised to read this thread again.   :o   Two Paperwhites here and we both love them.   But if we did not like them, we would have something else.  A e-book reader is too personal of a item, to keep something you do not like.  

I like brussel sprouts, others not liking them doesn't detract from my enjoyment. I always say "More for me!"
Now maybe you can get that third PW.

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    Offline FearIndex

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    Re: So you didn't like the Paperwhite, now what? The solutions thread
    « Reply #101 on: October 04, 2013, 01:26:04 am »
    While I wait for the international shipment of my Kindle PW2 (ships the 15th - still time to cancel, keep those experiences coming please), I'm already bracing for a disappointment and decided to "refresh" my $79 Kindle 4 official lighted Amazon case, which I use with my black $69 Kindle 5 (and before that with my grey $79 Kindle 4). I have been using the case with a piece of cardboard (https://www.kboards.com/index.php/topic,131020.0.html) since last October and with that fix, to fix the light from shining to my eyes, it has indeed worked very nicely.

    I absolutely love the $69 Kindle 5, it is a great e-ink experience with the best text blackness of any Kindle. If it weren't for the advanced features in the PW, I wouldn't be eyeing the PW2 upgrade at all (I also have PW1 but I don't like the screen/light).

    I was thinking about the purple version of the cover, to get some new color (a gret picture review here: http://the-gadgeteer.com/2011/11/20/kindle-lighted-leather-cover-review/) but unfortunately the non-black $69/$79 Kindle 4/5 covers have a grey interior, whereas the black has a darker interior. Even though the black cover predates the black $69 Kindle 5 by a year, its darker interior fits my black $69 Kindle 5 much better than a grey interior would. In fact, it fits the black Kindle much better than the grey Kindle it was originally bought for. So I'm afraid non-black cover could clash and lighter grey look a bit cheap too.

    Anyway, since I had some quality concerns with this case (light shining to eyes without the cardboard patch, leather quality not up to other official Kindle covers, a bit too tight fit hindering button presses on some), I decided to see if two years in production had helped any. I'll get fresh leather on the same go. Judging by the recent reviews it probably hasn't improved, but we'll see. I'll put the 2011 bought Amazon Kindle Lighted Leather Cover, Black against the 2013 bought Amazon Kindle Lighted Leather Cover, Black and see if anything is different.

    Has anyone else noticed any evolution in the "little" Kindle lighted (or non-lighted) official case over the past two years? Or have the niggles remained absolutely the same?

    I'll post more when I get the new case... and of course when I get PW2.

    Offline FearIndex

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    Re: So you didn't like the Paperwhite, now what? The solutions thread
    « Reply #102 on: October 05, 2013, 01:35:03 am »
    I decided to order two more colors of the lighted baby Kindle cover, as I'm upgrading a family member to $69 Kindle 5. I'll see what the differences in colors are, for myself, then. I also ordered a spare Kindle 5, just in case Amazon's e-ink plans progress as badly as they have. I think, even with the compromise that it is, $69 Kindle 5 remains the best pure e-ink experience on Kindle, with unrivalled text blackness and contrast.

    I'll report on the cases when I get them. I'm still thinking a black decal to lessen light glare would be a good addition.

    As for the PW2, there is some good (but unfortunately bad sounding) discussion in the defective PaperWhite (https://www.kboards.com/index.php/topic,128460.525.html) thread. Solution for one poster was to stay at Kindle Touch. Rational choice for me would be to cancel the PW2 order, but I guess I'll wait for more experiences still. The international shipping isn't until 15th.

    Offline FearIndex

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    Re: So you didn't like the Paperwhite, now what? The solutions thread
    « Reply #103 on: October 07, 2013, 01:26:44 pm »
    Still waiting for the international PW2 shipping date...

    In the meanwhile, my Kindle upgrade project is progressing. Amazon (and UPS) really surprised me again with their shipping speed. An order made Friday afternoon shipped on Saturday and delivered Monday morning. This was default, standard shipping. It may not seem that out of the ordinary, but the distance was from U.S. to Northern Europe, through customs and all. Slight problem that one of the items ordered didn't ship yet, although it was marked as in stock (the olive green lighted cover), but Amazon shipped all it could immediately at no extra cost, so I'm more than happy so far with this round of service. The last piece will arrive when it does, no problem.

    Anyway, I got some new $69 Kindle 5 covers to play with and install for family etc. There were some small differences in the 2011 vs. 2013 version of the $79/$69 Kindle 4/5 official lighted covers, most significantly a slightly different light, requiring slightly different modding. The new light is more benign, and easier on the eyes, but would seem to require a little more light power in the form of a reflective cardboard mod. Anyway, not to crowd the wrong threads, I put those into their own thread here: https://www.kboards.com/index.php/topic,164293.0.html



    So far it still seems the best Kindle for me is a cardboard-modded $69 Kindle 5, although I'm still thinking which cover color to keep for myself. The light grey interior of the colored covers is something to get over, but I'm still considering it. I'm also looking at DecalGirl for made lessening the shinyness of the black baby Kindle front bezel, I think that might be useful in perfecting the experience.

    Or maybe Paperwhite 2 will surprise me when the international orders finally ship next week?

    Offline FearIndex

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    Re: So you didn't like the Paperwhite, now what? The solutions thread
    « Reply #104 on: October 08, 2013, 12:58:13 pm »
    In the meanwhile, my Kindle upgrade project is progressing. Amazon (and UPS) really surprised me again with their shipping speed. An order made Friday afternoon shipped on Saturday and delivered Monday morning. This was default, standard shipping. It may not seem that out of the ordinary, but the distance was from U.S. to Northern Europe, through customs and all. Slight problem that one of the items ordered didn't ship yet, although it was marked as in stock (the olive green lighted cover), but Amazon shipped all it could immediately at no extra cost, so I'm more than happy so far with this round of service. The last piece will arrive when it does, no problem.

    I continue to be impressed by Amazon's logistics operation. Originally the whole shipment was promised by Wednesday (standard shipping over the pond), yet most items already arrived on Monday from Philadelphia. It seems the last piece was (literally) partying it up in Las Vegas and shipped Monday for a delivery tomorrow, which means the whole thing should still arrive by Wednesday - Amazon just shipped the items separately straight from whatever warehouses apparently had the items available the fastest, at no extra cost, even though I had selected group items together. I appreciate their effort.

    I will continue experimenting with different Kindle 4/5 covers and maybe the DecalGirl skins, while I wait for my PW2 experiment... ever in search of perfection. ;)

    As I posted on the accessories forum here with a pic, I got to modding the new cases with glossy cardboard to help the case light brightness a little.

    Offline FearIndex

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    Re: So you didn't like the Paperwhite, now what? The solutions thread
    « Reply #105 on: October 09, 2013, 11:43:16 am »
    If anyone is interested, I did some weight comparisons with a scale:

    $69 Kindle 4B/5 naked: 168 grams (approx. 5.93 ounces)
    $69 Kindle 4B/5 with official lighted cover: 313 g
    PaperWhite 1 3G: 220 g
    PaperWhite 1 3G with official case: 355 g

    PaperWhite 2 is 6 grams lighter than PW1 and 3G looses 9 grams by official numbers, so PW2 Wi-Fi with official case: approx. 340 g

    The above-mentioned olive green Kindle cover also arrived today, in 2011 Kindle packaging no less and with the old colder, brighter light... more on that in the accessories section: https://www.kboards.com/index.php/topic,164293.msg2358676.html#msg2358676

    What I'm going to do next is check out the different cases and baby Kindles I have for the best case color/LED color combinations, because there are differences in the case lighting. Also I need to determine which colors go well together - I'll try to snap a shot in daylight at some point of the cases.

    Offline FearIndex

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    Re: So you didn't like the Paperwhite, now what? The solutions thread
    « Reply #106 on: October 10, 2013, 02:47:51 am »
    So, again time to recap this year's $69 Kindle 5 setup/upgrade adventure. In the appropriate areas of the forum I have posted my experiences with the different Kindle lighted cover colors and the DecalGirl matte skin (see end of message for a few pics and links). Anyway, where does this leave me with the $69 Kindle 5? Well, I'm upgrading some family from older Kindles with the $69 Kindle 5 now that it seems that is the pinnacle of regular e-ink experience on Kindle for now. I still think the Paperwhite is a bit polarizing to replace our Kindle use, the pure e-ink experience has plenty of upsides in my opinion and the frontlight still a bit controversial. Barring any surprises, the baby Kindle and the covers is what me and my relatives will be using for the next year. Those Kindle 3 Keyboard uses finally retiring.

    With the Kindles and the lighted leather covers there is still a bit of puzzle to come to terms with. The grey-interiored colorful covers would work better with the grey baby Kindle, where as the black ones work better with the black Kindle. It really down comes to personal preference and maybe a little experimenting. Also all the covers have somewhat different LED lights, which come down to personal preference quite a bit. Someone may like less bright, someone more bright, so I still need to see how we'll mix and match the devices and the covers. There is also the question of what kind of cardboard etc. fixes I will do on the cases to avoid light shining into the eyes, matte black is the easy fix, but with glossy white cardboard one could adjust the light brightness on the Kindle a bit.

    Then there is the DecaGirl option. I got a couple of the matte black film and so far have put it on one Kindle to test out. It does disperse the light on the top of the Kindle and hides the bright logo and fingerprints, but it also adds a bit of a brownish tint to the device and a (light-dispersing) texture to the bezel. Time will tell. I will probably be toying with these different variables in the coming weeks and months still. :) It really comes down to personal preference who likes what, in these terms. We'll just pick what feels natural in the longer term.

    Anyway, I still have the Paperwhite 2 on international pre-order (they start shipping on the 15th) and if I keep it that way, I will be sure to write my review on it to the reviews section of this forum. But as for $69 Kindle 5 I'll now get back to reading on it, just got a new book to celebrate yesterday... :)

    Amazon lighted leather covers, olive green, wine purple, black:



    More: https://www.kboards.com/index.php/topic,164293.msg2358676.html#msg2358676

    DecalGirl matte skin on the left:



    More: https://www.kboards.com/index.php/topic,164514.0.html

    Offline FearIndex

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    Re: So you didn't like the Paperwhite, now what? The solutions thread
    « Reply #107 on: October 15, 2013, 12:00:52 pm »
    How does Kindle DX "Graphite" compare to my other Kindles:

    As an unexpected lateral move in my search to find the perfect Kindle e-ink reading experience (earlier in this thread I've looked at Kindle PW, 5, 4, 3 and 2, see above and my signature), I bit when Amazon.com lowered their Kindle DX "Graphite" pricing to $189 (down from previous $239 and original $379) and the leather cover to $9.99 (down from $49.99). Here are my impressions.

    Kindle DX "Graphite" is in many ways an odd creature. Living in the twilight of Kindle generations long gone - remaining (now on fire sale, perhaps for the last time) only for the lack of a similar-sized replacement or slow sales, probably both. But it was odd already the day it was born, sort of a member of the third-generation Kindle family, but then again not. In many ways, the Kindle DX, still on sale during the sixth (!) Kindle generation, is a second-generation Kindle. That's almost four generations separating it from the latest Paperwhite 2 and yet, there they still are, sold side by side on Amazon.com.

    Kindle DX in the middle (inside cover in the top picture), Kindle 2 (left) and Kindle 3 on the sides:



    Bigger picture: http://imageshack.us/a/img844/9132/t90k.jpg



    Bigger picture: http://imageshack.us/a/img713/2751/dp6g.jpg

    Hardware:

    This age difference becomes obvious when you open the packaging (which is, by the way, exactly like those larger, boxier second and third-generation Kindle packages were). Initially Kindle DX looks like a giant Kindle 3 Keyboard (Kindle DX has a 9.7" screen compared to regular 6"), but holding it in your hand it actually feels like a giant Kindle 2.

    The back is the obvious giveaway: it is metallic like on Kindle 2, not rubbery plastic like on Kindle 3 Keyboard. The shade of the metal is darker to match the graphite front (which, by the way, is the same color as the darker Kindle 3), but the feel in your hand is very Kindle 2 - also, it feels quite heavy, almost a monster next to the diminutive latest $69 Kindle 5. To perfect the nostalgy trip to simpler Kindle times, the button layout is nearly identical to Kindle 2, down to the little 5-way joystick (now only in graphite) and menu, home and back keys lining the right-side page change keys. To make the confusion complete, it uses the same font as Kindle 3, printed on a Kindle 2 button layout. (Unlike any other button-Kindle, the Kindle DX does not have page change keys on the left side, which is rather unfortunate in my use.)

    Interior hardware of Kindle DX "Graphite" is also a mix and match of the second and third-generation Kindles. It has a version of the third-generation "pearl" e-ink screen (resolution 824 x 1200 vs. 600 x 800 normally), but only the same amount of RAM as Kindle 2 (half that of Kindle 3), so it runs a version of the Kindle 2 software (2.5.8 was pre-installed). And just like Kindle 2, there is no Wi-Fi. This global version of Kindle DX "Graphite" comes only with 3G, which does work very well of course. Then again, Kindle DX has the Kindle 3 storage capacity of 4 GB - twice that of Kindle 2, $79 Kindle 4/$69 Kindle 5 and Kindle PW1/PW2.

    There is of course the keyboard too, shaped a little differently than on Kindle 2, but otherwise the same. I do like the fact that relatively the keyboard on the Kindle DX seems to take less space than on a Kindle 2 - those flat keys actually take up less vertical space than the Kindle 2 keyboard does. Finally as an unique touch, Kindle DX has an accelerometer and an auto-rotate option in the "Aa" menu, in addition to the usual manual rotation modes. (All of this applies to both the older white and newer graphite Kindle DX from 2009 and 2010 respectively, the only different is the screen, case color and the U.S./3G wireless variants.)

    As a small reminder of years past, Kindle DX also comes standard with a (U.S.) charger, in addition to the USB cable - just like the first Kindle generations did.

    Screen:

    The big thing, literally the big thing, about Kindle DX is of course the screen. It has grown 3.7" from the regular Kindle and by 224 x 400 in pixels to 824 x 1200 pixels (beating even the PW, which is 758 x 1024). The pixels haven't increased quite as much as the screen-size has, though, so PPI is down from 167 ppi on regular non-PW Kindles to 150 ppi on the Kindle DX. Indeed, Kindle DX has the worst pixels-per-inch of any Kindle. The PPI isn't bad, but it is noticeably more pixellated than the average Kindle. It isn't really visible once you get to reading though, but on broader inspection it isn't hard to see.

    Looking at the Kindle DX screen and my old Kindle 3 Keyboard side by side, they are definitely of the same breed. Text blackness is pretty much equal, meaning blacker text than Kindle 2 or my Kindle PW, but less black than on my $79 Kindle 4 and $69 Kindle 5. All in all, the contrast is perfectly fine. I'd call it good, even.

    The screen is surprisingly nice. It does take some getting used to, reading from such a large e-ink screen, but it is surprisingly appealing. I like this Kindle DX, I really do. There is some of that magic there that made me fall in love with the earliest Kindle generations. It's just a really nice no-compromises, if anything a little classical flare, regular e-ink reader with a big screen.

    Software:

    The software is, basically, Kindle 2. About the only thing extra is the above-mentioned automatic screen rotation which works as advertised, but I turned it off from the "Aa" menu because I can't see myself using it much. The larger screen and resolution means more text fits onto the screen and the software makes good use of this. Compared to modern Kindles, it does seem pretty slow though, and there is no option for partial screen refreshes - although the 2.5 softare update has some things like Facebook integration, popular highlights and PDF pan & zoom. As the latter suggests, you can also read PDFs on it (transfer via USB cable or email), which I will get back to in a moment.

    Something maybe forgotten in this day an age of glossy black, small Kindles are some of the features Kindle DX has, that Kindle Paperwhites or $69 Kindle 5 do not have. The most important thing is the audio, not only are there speakers on the bottom, there is also a standard 3.5" headphone jack on the top. The headphone placement is a bit odd, but if you need it, it is there (again, it is the same place as in Kindle 2 reminding us of that heritage). What this enables in software, then, are text-to-speech, audio book support and "experimental" MP3 player, which modern e-ink Kindles do not have.

    PDFs on Kindle DX:

    Logically PDFs sound like a really good potential use of the big screen, but the reality was rumoured to be rather tedious. To quickly test, I loaded four PDFs onto the Kindle DX:

    - the Kindle user guide PDF (2.6 MB, 145 pages, https://kindle.s3.amazonaws.com/Kindle%20User%27s%20Guide,%204A%20Ed.%20-%20English.pdf), just as an example what reading a book-like basic PDF would feel like

    - an an issue of Engadget Distro e-zine (14.8 MB, 110 pages, http://stadium.weblogsinc.com/engadget/distro/072613_DISTRO_book.pdf), full-pictured magazine-like content, but still meant for tablet-sized viewing

    - an European Space Agency ESA white paper (12.5 MB, 202 pages, http://www.esa.int/esapub/br/br250/br250.pdf), a landscape PDF with two magazine pages on each page

    - another ESA white paper (5,1 MB, 48 pages, http://www.esa.int/esapub/br/br176/br176.pdf), this time in portrait A4 pages

    What I noticed with the PDFs is: When they work, they actually work really well, if you don't have to pan and zoom, because that's a pain (you press Aa, then choose from fit-to-screen, 150%, 200%, 300% or actual size - and the use the joystick to move around the screen) and you can't reflow a PDF. But if you do just fit-to-screen, and thanks to the size of the Kindle DX there is plenty of screen, reading is no easier or harder than reading any Kindle book. For example, the Kindle user guide PDF works really well, I'd even go as far as to say it works better than the included Kindle book version.

    Engadget Distro works really well too, it opens up snappily - only some pages with larger pictures tend to load maybe a second or so, other pages load immediately. The font size on Engadget Distro is fine, after all it is sized for iPad viewing which is similarly sized. I do wish Amazon added a 110% option to the size options (or a custom percentage), though, because the Distro has quite wide margins and enlarging the page just a little would enlargen the fonts just so. Color pictures display perfectly adequately in grey and the PDF layout is reproduced faithfully. All in all, if you are just going to read page by page (and not expect going on a fast page-browsing session) from beginning to end, reading Engadget Distro on Kindle DX is very possible. (Too bad Engadget cancelled the magazine itself.)

    The biggest challenge was always going to be the "A4 paper" test. An A4 paper, the standard paper size on Europe, is somewhat larger than the entire surface area of Kindle DX - and much larger than its 9.7" screen. The ESA paper is roughly "A3" size, which means two A4 papers side to side. This was a good test to see if the landscape mode helps any and how to pan and zoom such large pages... Well, it wasn't too promising, it actually just crashes the Kindle and reboots automatically. It shows the first page, but no matter what I do, crash is the end-result. Reading online this is something that sometimes happens on e-ink readers, most probably the reader runs out of memory. I'm fairly certain editing the PDF in Adobe Acrobat to smaller size, splitting it or maybe a different version would do the trick - but one needs to be aware of this.

    The A4 sized ESA white paper fared better technically and seems to work perfectly, layout-wise. Pragmatically, there are problems. At portrait fit-to-screen, the text becomes quite small. Not impossible to read small, you can still read it, but still a little zooming would do good. If you push the zooming to the lowest level, 150%, it divides the page into roughly four segments that you have to switch between using the joystick. Quite tedious to read a single line and have to pan (rather slowly as you can imagine from e-ink) right just to read the end of the line and then back left to read the next line. Again, having a 110% or 120% zoom options would help because the document has quite large margins and there would be room to zoom a little to make the fonts larger, but 150% is just too much.

    How about that landscape mode, then? Well the auto-rotate works quite nicely, it takes a while to react but that's better than suffering from random rotations. This mode does make the use of page turning buttons a little awkward, they are, on the bottom (or if you flip, they are on the top but their direction isn't reversed so arrow "up" actually means "go down" - originally Kindle DX had the less ambiguous NEXT/PREV PAGE printed here like Kindle 2, the "Graphite" version mimicking Kindle 3 has confused this functionality). The good news, though, is that in landscape mode the page is fit to fill the screen sideways and pressing next or previous page takes you to the next or previous segment of the page, so you don't have to pan using the joystick. If you get comfortable with the orientation, this way any regular-sized PDF is probably quite readable. I just wish there were page turning buttons on the shorter edges for this otherwise very useful orientation! Letting the user change to next page with the space bar would be an easy fix, because it is suitably located.

    Leather cover and weight:

    As the Kindle DX is based on the second-generation Kindle (and probably for practical considerations due to its size), it doesn't have the third-generation Kindle support for lighted covers. Amazon does still sell the regular official leather cover for Kindle DX, though, with the diminutive price sticker mentioned at the start of my post. Judging by Internet posts, this is a revised version of the cover for the "Graphite" generation: The original Kindle DX cover from 2009 has the metallic Amazon Kindle badge on front and no rubber band to close it, similar to the official Kindle 2 leather cover - the older DX cover does apparently use magnets for closing though and is heavier. The leather cover I received is like the Kindle 3 Keyboard non-lit leather cover, with a rubber band with its attached leather Amazon Kindle badge and no metallic badges.

    So, this cover belongs to the third Kindle generation and just like the second and third-generation Kindles, the cover attaches to the Kindle via two metallic prongs, the bottom one you first slide the Kindle into and then pull to top one down to fit into the Kindle and lock it into place (to remove, just reverse the process). Once in the case, the Kindle is protected quite well, because the open sides of the case protrude significantly over the edges of the device itself - and you can keep the whole thing closed using the rubber band. When reading, the front of the cover turns to the back of the reader, although it seems a little stiff at least at first.

    I do have to say, in and out of the cover, and especially in, Kindle DX is pretty hefty. Without the (non-lighted) cover it weighs 536 grams and with it, 900 grams. In comparison, $69 Kindle 5 is 168 grams naked and 313 grams in its lighted cover, Kindle Paperwhite 3G is 220 grams and 355 grams in its non-lighted cover (all numbers as measured by me on the same scale). So to read, it is probably easiest to rest it onto a pillow or at least on your legs when reading sitting up. Just for comparison, an iPad 4 weighs 650 grams, so Kindle DX is in the same ballpark, less than that without a cover. That said, this doesn't seem to be any kind of a show stopper, but it is something to understand.

    Summary:

    In the context of my search for the perfect Kindle reading experience, Kindle DX is definitely the odd one out. I wanted to get in on this classic action before the chance is gone. Who knows when we'll see anything of the sort from Amazon, if ever. I do have to say, I wish it was this easy to like the latest Kindles. It really is easy to appreciate the pure, no issues e-ink experience on the Kindle DX and the full host of controls and features of a classic e-ink reading device. The only gripe, really: I wish they hadn't lost the left-side page changing buttons and had better buttons for landscape reading. I get it that it may be too heavy to hold one-handed, and those buttons would have lessened the holding area, but still I do miss them.

    Anyway, adding a third-party clip-on light onto the cover could make this a serious contender. Then again, I don't read newspapers or scientific papers on Kindle, and the DX is a bit large for just getting lost into fiction, so there's that... But nevertheless, the first impression is I do like it a lot. Makes for a potentially very useful machine for reading PDF manuals that have larger pages than can be comfortably read on a regular Kindle.

    Funny thing. There were moments when I held the Kindle DX in my hands and got the distinct impression I was looking at an enlarged Kindle 3 - the leather cover hides the difference of the back and looking from an angle even the keyboard down there looks pretty similar. It felt almost comical, like the device was a mockup of sort, a joke.

    But it's a good joke.

    Offline FearIndex

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    Re: So you didn't like the Paperwhite, now what? The solutions thread
    « Reply #108 on: October 18, 2013, 02:11:44 am »
    Thanks to some friends/relatives, I had a chance to briefly check side-to-side four $69 Kindles in black (aka Kindle 5 or Kindle 4B to some folks). As some have had different experiences as to how black the $69 Kindle text actually is, I thought it would be useful to see what the variances are - so people can adjust their expectations and understand where others may be coming from. There are some differences between late 2012 and late 2013 models, at least if these samples are anything to go by.

    Differences between late 2012 and late 2013 $69 Kindles:

    - Late models have 2013 copyright on the box and a smaller Kindle logo on the box (like Paperwhite 2)
    - Not sure if this is a model or U.S. vs. international model, but out of these the 2012 model has a B023 and 2013 models 9023 serial number
    - All the 2013 models have slightly warmer screen backgrounds and little less black text than the 2012 model, 2012 is blackest/coldest

    All of these Kindles, in isolation, are perfectly fine screen-wise. But it is in comparison that one can see the difference.

    Here is a photo, the 2012 model in the bottom left corner which has visibly the blackest blacks.

    The camera/ambient lighting makes the two top Kindles look a little more grey texted than they actually are, but all three 2013 models do have greyer text than the 2012 model:



    Bigger photo: http://imageshack.us/a/img41/4633/a8vr.jpg

    Of course, even in the grey $79 Kindle aka Kindle 4 launch in 2011 some were reporting contrast issues, so these may be overall variances - or they may be year-to-year differences. But it is good to understand that some contrast variance will be part of the game even on the $69 Kindle. Like I reported on the lighted Kindle covers LED differences, some variance is there too.

    Offline Toby

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    Re: So you didn't like the Paperwhite, now what? The solutions thread
    « Reply #109 on: October 18, 2013, 08:51:37 pm »
    Thanks again for a great review. I have the K4 & though the text is dark & very readable, I was curious about the K5. Now, that you said that it might or might have darker text, I'll wait, since my K4 is still going strong.

    Offline FearIndex

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    Re: So you didn't like the Paperwhite, now what? The solutions thread
    « Reply #110 on: October 19, 2013, 04:08:06 am »
    Thanks again for a great review. I have the K4 & though the text is dark & very readable, I was curious about the K5. Now, that you said that it might or might have darker text, I'll wait, since my K4 is still going strong.

    Yes, it would be interesting to see other impressions on 2013-bought $69 Kindles. Are the all a little lighter than late 2013 $69 Kindles or is it just some batch or unit to unit variances?


    Offline northofdivision

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    Re: So you didn't like the Paperwhite, now what? The solutions thread
    « Reply #112 on: October 20, 2013, 09:32:46 am »
    Personally, I'm a big fan of the older Sony 650prs 6" and 350prs 5" (be sure not to get the prs300 *older model*) Paid 30$ each for them...The font pack allows you about 20 fonts with control over font weight, contrast and tons of personalization controls. If you're able to do a little workaround with calibre in regard to files, they're amazing readers that give you both touch turning via screen or manual button page turning. Build quality is amazing. Unfortunately, if you're azw only Kindle files and don't have .mobi and .epub, many of us are stuck in Amazon's book ecosystem. Truly a shame because they're great readers. Latter pic are my PW2 and K4 with personalized screensavers.



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    (Make your own reading bar)

    Offline FearIndex

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    Re: So you didn't like the Paperwhite, now what? The solutions thread
    « Reply #113 on: October 20, 2013, 11:15:35 am »
    Thank you for adding those insights and images to the discussion, northofdivision!

    I must look into the alternatives one day.

    Many PW type of device likers have considered Kobo Aura.

    Offline northofdivision

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    Re:
    « Reply #114 on: October 20, 2013, 12:02:09 pm »
    I'm very curious of the Kobo Aura.  That flushed bezel is appealing and I wonder how it performs/build quality. 

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    Offline SusanCassidy

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    Re: So you didn't like the Paperwhite, now what? The solutions thread
    « Reply #115 on: October 20, 2013, 02:54:07 pm »
    The K5 is, and always has been, the Kindle Touch, not the 69 Basic version.

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    Re:
    « Reply #116 on: October 20, 2013, 03:48:11 pm »
    The K5 is, and always has been, the Kindle Touch, not the 69 Basic version.

    Actually, it seems to me that most people call the touch, the touch. And the basic, the basic...or mini or baby. Most don't use K4 or K5 because of the high possibility of confusion. 

    Betsy will correct me if necessary, but I actually thought the touch and the first basic model came out at the same time, so to say one is 4 and the other is 5 is a bit arbitrary.

    It is true that one could go by the firmware main numbers, but by that criteria, the PW is also 5. :)

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    Offline Toby

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    Re: So you didn't like the Paperwhite, now what? The solutions thread
    « Reply #117 on: October 21, 2013, 11:42:56 am »
    You are right, Ann. I also call my K4 the baby kindle, but don't here as I don't want to confuse people. The PW2 is really the 6th generation of kindles - the K4 & Touch, the K5 & PW1, now the PW2.

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    Re: So you didn't like the Paperwhite, now what? The solutions thread
    « Reply #118 on: October 21, 2013, 11:53:45 am »
    You are right, Ann. I also call my K4 the baby kindle, but don't here as I don't want to confuse people. The PW2 is really the 6th generation of kindles - the K4 & Touch, the K5 & PW1, now the PW2.

    People would totally understand 'baby kindle'. :)

    As to the other, I think the thing is the tree has branched -- hence the confusion.

    So K1 is the root.

    Then K2.

    Then a single branch off the K2 part of the trunk to the DX.  Which later was upgraded to the DXG -- little better screen etc.

    Then the K3 on top of the K2 part of the trunk -- but it came in multiple flavors: with or without WiFi.  So did the trunk branch there or what? I don't think so, really, they're just some leaves. ::)

    On top of THAT is the basic and the Touch and the trunk definitely branches here, I think, because you're talking about two very different input systems.  The later PW's grow off the Touch side of the trunk.  The basic side has an updated model, but I think it's the same OS number.

    Fires are whole 'nother tree from a cutting someone took at the Touch level. :D  It mutated.
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    Re: So you didn't like the Paperwhite, now what? The solutions thread
    « Reply #119 on: October 21, 2013, 11:57:06 am »
    Yes, that too. :D

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    Re: So you didn't like the Paperwhite, now what? The solutions thread
    « Reply #120 on: October 21, 2013, 12:01:57 pm »
    The K5 is, and always has been, the Kindle Touch, not the 69 Basic version.

    I disagree. Not all call it that.

    I agree that the logic of using the firmware major number exists on some forums - and Kindle Touch was called 5 in some places, because of its firmware. But that logic fell flat on its face when PW also became 5. Is it also Kindle 5?

    There is pertinent logic behind calling $69 Kindle the Kindle 5. It is the fifth product to bear the name "Kindle", without any other monikers. Kindle was first, then Kindle 2, then Kindle 3 (only later renamed Kindle Keyboard), then just Kindle (fourth generation) and then a new Kindle with a new color and a new pricepoint, aka Kindle 5. Wikipedia calls the $69 Kindle as Kindle 5, as do many on KB.

    I can see that there is some logic to calling Kindle 5 just a variant of Kindle 4, and thus Kindle 4B, but I also think calling it the Kindle 5 is way more logical than labeling Kindle Touch as Kindle 5, which seems very illogical because it isn't called "Kindle" at all, but "Kindle Touch".  It isn't fifth Kindle Touch either, it is the first Kindle Touch. And even if we were to think Kindle Touch should be Kindle 5 because it is the fifth Kindle model, it should be called Kindle 6 because of Kindle DX.

    And... PW isn't called Kindle 5, why would it be, it is called Kindle Paperwhite and logically PW2 is Paperwhite 2, not suddenly something else due to firmware numbering.

    Really, I have been trying to make the "Kindle Touch is Kindle 5" logic work in my mind, but I just can't see how we can justify calling it that anymore. It just doesn't work. We could decide to call the $69 Kindle black as Kindle 4B instead of Kindle 5, I can see some logic in that, but I think calling it Kindle 5 makes sense as it was announced as part of the fifth-generation and the grey color was faded out.

    Let's face it: Amazon changed the game and numbering Kindles by their firmware versions no longer works. It makes more sense to number them by their name and how many generations there are of that name. Hence Kindle Touch is Kindle Touch, if there ever is another Kindle Touch, the next one would be Kindle Touch 2. PW is PW or now PW1, PW2 is PW2, the next one is PW3 etc. It just makes so much more sense than looking at the firmware numbers.

    Just my opinion, of course.

    Offline FearIndex

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    Re: So you didn't like the Paperwhite, now what? The solutions thread
    « Reply #121 on: October 21, 2013, 12:18:52 pm »
    Good points Ann, about the branching.

    Then a single branch off the K2 part of the trunk to the DX.  Which later was upgraded to the DXG -- little better screen etc.

    DXG being called that instead of DX2 would support calling the $69 Kindle black as Kindle 4B instead of Kindle 5, the upgrade was similar in nature.

    I have nothing against Kindle 4B as a name, I think it makes sense. I think calling Kindle 4B as Kindle 5 also makes sense to me, the fifth-generation product named "Kindle". I could also live with calling DXG the DX2, but I agree DXG is so widely used and makes sense, there is no point in trying to change that.

    But I don't see any current logic in calling Kindle Touch the Kindle 5. I think if some call it that, a change - due to later events if nothing else - would seem warranted.

    Offline northofdivision

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    Re:
    « Reply #122 on: October 21, 2013, 02:54:03 pm »
    Ok. Baby kindle it is!

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    Re: So you didn't like the Paperwhite, now what? The solutions thread
    « Reply #123 on: October 21, 2013, 03:14:48 pm »
    Good points Ann, about the branching.

    DXG being called that instead of DX2 would support calling the $69 Kindle black as Kindle 4B instead of Kindle 5, the upgrade was similar in nature.

    I have nothing against Kindle 4B as a name, I think it makes sense. I think calling Kindle 4B as Kindle 5 also makes sense to me, the fifth-generation product named "Kindle". I could also live with calling DXG the DX2, but I agree DXG is so widely used and makes sense, there is no point in trying to change that.

    But I don't see any current logic in calling Kindle Touch the Kindle 5. I think if some call it that, a change - due to later events if nothing else - would seem warranted.

    Note that Amazon never called any of them K1 or K2 or anything.  When there was one Kindle it was kindle.  When the next model came out, it was the Kindle.  If they every referred to the earlier one, they called it the 'previous generation'.  And as soon as they released more than one distinctly different new one in the same year, the numbering stopped working. :)

    When they released the Touch and the basic, the basic is the Kindle, and the Touch is the Kindle Touch.  At that time they had not yet phased out the K3 so they referred to it as the Kindle Keyboard.  And they've always called the PaperWhite the PaperWhite. WE Here specify PW1 or PW2 to distinguish which model year it's from. Though they do have the indicator on the strip across the top of "New" on the WiFi only model.  Presumably when the "New" 3G model is available they'll note it there as well, but currently the 3G model for sale is last year's model.

    As to the DX, again, amazon only ever called it the DX.  They did specify when they released one that would work internationally.  When they did the slight upgrade, they changed the case cover to dark gray or 'graphite' and people here decided to use DXG to distinguish it from the previous year's models.
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    Re: So you didn't like the Paperwhite, now what? The solutions thread
    « Reply #124 on: October 22, 2013, 04:35:34 am »
    Note that Amazon never called any of them K1 or K2 or anything.  When there was one Kindle it was kindle.  When the next model came out, it was the Kindle.  If they every referred to the earlier one, they called it the 'previous generation'.  And as soon as they released more than one distinctly different new one in the same year, the numbering stopped working. :)

    Good point. I actually remembered they called Kindle 2 by a number, but now that I check you are right they didn't. iPad confusing my mind, maybe! My receipt for it says "Kindle Wireless Reading Device (6" Display, Global Wireless, Latest Generation)". It wasn't even that many years ago, but so the memory plays tricks. :)

    I didn't think they called the next one Kindle 3 though, as I do remember the ambiguity there. It was "Kindle Wireless Reading Device, Wi-Fi, 6" Display, Graphite - Latest Generation". I tried to point out that the Kindle Keyboard moniker came later - thus it was logical for us to call it Kindle 3, because it was the third product named Kindle without other monikers.

    I think the numbering works best when you simply associate it with the name of the product and the generation. So, products named Kindle 1-5, products named Kindle Paperwhite 1-2, products named Kindle Touch 1-1 so far... :) I do agree sometimes it might be useful to skip advancing the number and just call the product by a new color, like DXG or maybe 4B instead of 5.

    The big "problem", of course, is what to call it if Amazon ever launched a completely new basic Kindle? To me, Kindle 6 would make sense, but what about all those people who feel the $69 Kindle is Kindle 4... Then again, if they feel Kindle 5 is Kindle Touch, Kindle 6 should work for them too. :)

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