Author Topic: 4 Ways to Turn a Notebook Into a Powerful Writing Tool  (Read 31172 times)  

Offline GrandmaBirdie

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50 Ways to Say "Bring"
« Reply #100 on: February 13, 2017, 06:02:39 am »
Do you overuse bring, brings, brought, and bringing? Maybe you don't even realize it. Time to search your WIP?

50 Ways to Say "Bring"

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    Offline mach 5

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    Re: 50 Ways to Say "Bring"
    « Reply #101 on: February 13, 2017, 07:03:40 am »
    I'm going to get addicted to your lists :)

    Offline GrandmaBirdie

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    Re: 50 Ways to Say "Bring"
    « Reply #102 on: February 13, 2017, 08:33:08 am »
    I'm going to get addicted to your lists :)

     :D Thanks for the thumbs up.

    Next week: Over 100 Ways to Say "Big"

    I love creating these.


    Offline GrandmaBirdie

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    The 100 Best Websites for Writers in 2017
    « Reply #103 on: February 15, 2017, 12:40:00 pm »
    What a pleasant surprise to review my website logs this morning and see that TheWriteLife.com has named my website one of the 100 best for writers.

    I'm stoked!

    The 100 Best Websites for Writers in 2017

    Offline unkownwriter

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    Re: The 100 Best Websites for Writers in 2017
    « Reply #104 on: February 15, 2017, 01:36:56 pm »
    That's nice. :)

    Offline Alan Petersen

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    Re: The 100 Best Websites for Writers in 2017
    « Reply #105 on: February 15, 2017, 02:03:16 pm »
    Cool! Your lists are very helpful so I can see why they included your site.

    And thanks for the info on this comprehensive list. Bunch of sites I hadn't heard about until now.


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    Offline BlouBryant

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    Re: The 100 Best Websites for Writers in 2017
    « Reply #106 on: February 15, 2017, 02:24:08 pm »
    What a pleasant surprise to review my website logs this morning and see that TheWriteLife.com has named my website one of the 100 best for writers.

    I'm stoked!

    The 100 Best Websites for Writers in 2017

    It's not a surprise to me. You've got some great stuff up there... you're in my top 20 bookmarks. Oh, and you're always super nice on here. 

    (Congratulations)

    BB


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    Offline MKK

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    Re: The 100 Best Websites for Writers in 2017
    « Reply #107 on: February 15, 2017, 02:30:16 pm »
    Congratulations and thanks for sharing the list. There are quite a few sites on there I've never visitedyour site not being one of them :)

    Offline EmmaS

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    Re: The 100 Best Websites for Writers in 2017
    « Reply #108 on: February 15, 2017, 03:12:49 pm »
    Well deserved! :)

    Offline GrandmaBirdie

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    Re: The 100 Best Websites for Writers in 2017
    « Reply #109 on: February 15, 2017, 03:26:45 pm »
    And thanks for the info on this comprehensive list. Bunch of sites I hadn't heard about until now.

    I intend to go through all the sites and check out their offerings.

    Congratulations and thanks for sharing the list. There are quite a few sites on there I've never visitedyour site not being one of them :)

    It's not a surprise to me. You've got some great stuff up there... you're in my top 20 bookmarks. Oh, and you're always super nice on here. 

    (Congratulations)

    BB

    Thanks, everyone!

    I drop by TheWriteLife whenever I need a break from writing. Great website.

    Offline Vinny OHare

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    Re: The 100 Best Websites for Writers in 2017
    « Reply #110 on: February 15, 2017, 04:41:26 pm »
    Congrats! I just shared it all over our social media. Some great sites listed.

    Offline GrandmaBirdie

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    Re: The 100 Best Websites for Writers in 2017
    « Reply #111 on: February 15, 2017, 06:33:37 pm »
    Congrats! I just shared it all over our social media. Some great sites listed.

    Thanks, Vinny!

    Offline Berries

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    Re: The 100 Best Websites for Writers in 2017
    « Reply #112 on: February 15, 2017, 09:18:05 pm »
    Congrats! I've always loved your name :)

    Lucinda Berry

    Offline GrandmaBirdie

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    Re: The 100 Best Websites for Writers in 2017
    « Reply #113 on: February 16, 2017, 05:37:15 am »
    Congrats! I've always loved your name :)

    Thanks!

    My grandkids came up with that moniker. I'm known as Grannie Stein on a few other writers' sites.

    Offline GrandmaBirdie

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    100 Ways to Say "Big"
    « Reply #114 on: February 20, 2017, 07:07:43 am »
    Does your WIP have a big problem with multiple repetitions of big?

    If you search Google for "most overused words in writing," big will appear on the majority of lists you find. This post provides alternatives.

    100 Ways to Say "Big"

    Offline Marti talbott

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    Re: 100 Ways to Say "Big"
    « Reply #115 on: February 20, 2017, 07:41:37 am »
    I very much appreciate these kinds of post. Thanks.
    Based on an actual event: The 1909 Dotsero Train Wreck https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B084H4Z23C/ref=dbs_a_def_rwt_hsch_vapi_tkin_p6_i5

    Author of over 50 novels   www.martitalbott.com

    Offline Talbot

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    Re: 100 Ways to Say "Big"
    « Reply #116 on: February 20, 2017, 07:43:04 am »
    Bigly!

    Offline GrandmaBirdie

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    Re: 100 Ways to Say "Big"
    « Reply #117 on: February 20, 2017, 09:44:56 am »
    I very much appreciate these kinds of post. Thanks.

    Thanks! Next week I'll cover little.

    Bigly!

    Heh heh. 8)

    Offline GrandmaBirdie

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    Re: 100 Ways to Say "Big"
    « Reply #118 on: February 20, 2017, 11:43:35 am »
    Love these posts. Shame they're not consolidated into one. Then it would be easy to get notified when you find another excellent list.

    Expanded versions of the lists will appear in a book sometime later this year.

    Offline GrandmaBirdie

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    Re: 100 Ways to Say "Big"
    « Reply #119 on: February 20, 2017, 12:49:59 pm »
    Please let us know when it's released. I'm definitely buying a copy. It's handy to have quick reference when my brain seizes up!   :-X

    Will do. I refer to the lists frequently as I write. I find they save me a lot of time.

    Offline WHDean

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    Re: 100 Ways to Say "Big"
    « Reply #120 on: February 21, 2017, 10:17:39 am »
    Does your WIP have a big problem with multiple repetitions of big?

    If you search Google for "most overused words in writing," big will appear on the majority of lists you find. This post provides alternatives.

    100 Ways to Say "Big"

    I found some of your advice puzzling. Take this pair of sentences:

    Quote
    Bernard's ego was bigger than his bank account.

    Bernard's ego outmatched his mammoth bank account.

    You said the second was better because it uses an active verb and a reader might misunderstand the first. I find that hard to believe. The formula "A's x is bigger than his y" is an English idiom, along with other stock variations like "His ambition outstripped his abilities." Most people would've heard it or used it and its variations many times.

    I also don't think the comparison works because outmatched implies a competition between his ego and his bank account, when the first sentence was only making a point about the size of Bernard's ego. Outmatched works better with "His lifestyle outmatched his bank account," or some such, though it's a different point about Bernard's character. The modifier mammoth only adds to the imbalance. If you have to describe the object of the comparison, you lose the pithiness of the idiom. Adding mammoth is like saying "His ego outmatched his bank account, which was very large by the way." We have to know the size of his bank account before the comparison is made for the idiom to work. 

    Then there's this pair:

    Quote
    The big tiger moved silently through the grass.

    The behemoth tiger stalked silently through the grass.

    Behemoth is a noun meaning "the largest and strongest thing," not an adjective, and I've never seen it used as a premodifier (M-W's "a behemoth truck" notwithstanding). It's usually used as a descriptive stand-in for a preceding noun (the technical term escapes me at the moment): "I saw the tiger again. This time the behemoth [= the tiger] was coming for me." 

    Silently adds something to moved, but nothing to stalked because to stalk (in its transitive form) means "to pursue by stealth" (= silently). Of course, stalked has no direct object in your example, making it intransitive. The intransitive meaning of stalked, however, is different from the transitive meaning: "The tiger stalked the man [trans. = pursued stealthily]" but "The tiger stalked away [intrans. = walked slowly and softly/walked away stiffly, sullenly]." So stalked can't be substituted for moved silently without giving it an object or changing the meaning of the sentence.   

    In many of the other examples I wondered why you didn't recommend striking out big altogether, instead of replacing it with a synonym. Take the "big bruise" example. You have a modifying phrase describing the bruise as impossible to hide (= big). Once you have that description, calling it big (or anything else) seems redundant.



    Offline GrandmaBirdie

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    Re: 100 Ways to Say "Big"
    « Reply #121 on: February 21, 2017, 12:55:54 pm »
    I found some of your advice puzzling. Take this pair of sentences:

    You said the second was better because it uses an active verb and a reader might misunderstand the first. I find that hard to believe. The formula "A's x is bigger than his y" is an English idiom, along with other stock variations like "His ambition outstripped his abilities." Most people would've heard it or used it and its variations many times.

    I also don't think the comparison works because outmatched implies a competition between his ego and his bank account, when the first sentence was only making a point about the size of Bernard's ego. Outmatched works better with "His lifestyle outmatched his bank account," or some such, though it's a different point about Bernard's character. The modifier mammoth only adds to the imbalance. If you have to describe the object of the comparison, you lose the pithiness of the idiom. Adding mammoth is like saying "His ego outmatched his bank account, which was very large by the way." We have to know the size of his bank account before the comparison is made for the idiom to work. 

    Then there's this pair:

    Behemoth is a noun meaning "the largest and strongest thing," not an adjective, and I've never seen it used as a premodifier (M-W's "a behemoth truck" notwithstanding). It's usually used as a descriptive stand-in for a preceding noun (the technical term escapes me at the moment): "I saw the tiger again. This time the behemoth [= the tiger] was coming for me." 

    Silently adds something to moved, but nothing to stalked because to stalk (in its transitive form) means "to pursue by stealth" (= silently). Of course, stalked has no direct object in your example, making it intransitive. The intransitive meaning of stalked, however, is different from the transitive meaning: "The tiger stalked the man [trans. = pursued stealthily]" but "The tiger stalked away [intrans. = walked slowly and softly/walked away stiffly, sullenly]." So stalked can't be substituted for moved silently without giving it an object or changing the meaning of the sentence.   

    In many of the other examples I wondered why you didn't recommend striking out big altogether, instead of replacing it with a synonym. Take the "big bruise" example. You have a modifying phrase describing the bruise as impossible to hide (= big). Once you have that description, calling it big (or anything else) seems redundant.

    The first example works if readers understand that Bernard has oodles of money. But maybe he's a mild-mannered accountant with an overdrawn account. The second leaves no room for misinterpretation.

    For the next set, writers often use nouns as adjectives. It's a literary technique that draws an instant picture in readers' minds.

    Offline GrandmaBirdie

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    Re: 100 Ways to Say "Big"
    « Reply #122 on: February 22, 2017, 10:22:14 am »

    Behemoth is a noun meaning "the largest and strongest thing," not an adjective, and I've never seen it used as a premodifier (M-W's "a behemoth truck" notwithstanding). It's usually used as a descriptive stand-in for a preceding noun (the technical term escapes me at the moment): "I saw the tiger again. This time the behemoth [= the tiger] was coming for me." 



    I found some examples for you showing behemoth used as an adjective.

    http://articles.courant.com/2005-12-24/news/0512240646_1_asian-marketing-foxwoods-resort-mohegan-sun-president

    https://www.nbr.co.nz/article/syft-technologies-sniffing-out-a-fortune

    http://www.atlasobscura.com/places/denali

    http://www.wrestlinginc.com/wi/news/2013/0822/565090/bill-goldberg-responds-to-wrestlemania-30-rumor/

    http://www.desertsun.com/story/sports/baseball/pete-donovan/2015/12/16/dodgers-clayton-kershaw-zack-greinke/77457282/

    Offline EC Sheedy

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    Re: 100 Ways to Say "Big"
    « Reply #123 on: February 22, 2017, 11:01:10 am »
    Love these lists--and I will definitely be looking forward to your book.

    I like the lists because they poke at my autopilot brain and help that foggy, lazy gray mass to visualize other choices.  :-*


    Offline Carol M

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    Re: 100 Ways to Say "Big"
    « Reply #124 on: February 22, 2017, 02:24:04 pm »
    Thank you! Posts like these are very helpful.

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