Author Topic: 60+ Ways to Replace "That"  (Read 31848 times)  

Offline Laran Mithras

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Re: Do your characters shrug too often?
« Reply #75 on: January 17, 2017, 05:07:50 am »
Mine was "leaning."

Leaned against the wall, leaned his head closer, leaned over the desk, leaned to look around...

 ::)

Sometimes my mind sees a scene and I type it instead of just concentrating on mood and dialog.

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    Offline GrandmaBirdie

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    Re: Do your characters shrug too often?
    « Reply #76 on: January 17, 2017, 05:51:30 am »
    Super helpful, thanks.

    I downloaded a copy of Nag, nag, nag, it looks very amusing  ;D

    Thanks, Evenstar. I made it perma-free. Megan and Emmett will return soon.

    Offline GrandmaBirdie

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    Re: Do your characters shrug too often?
    « Reply #77 on: January 17, 2017, 05:54:34 am »
    Mine was "leaning."

    Leaned against the wall, leaned his head closer, leaned over the desk, leaned to look around...

     ::)

    Sometimes my mind sees a scene and I type it instead of just concentrating on mood and dialog.

     ;D You're doing it write. The first draft is for spewing ideas.

    My personal nemesis is that. I always run a search during the editing phase to remove as many occurrences as possible.

    Offline wingsandwords

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    Re: Do your characters shrug too often?
    « Reply #78 on: January 17, 2017, 05:56:03 am »
    These lists are golden! I've bookmarked them so I can use them when going through my first edit--it's easy to say 'shrug' 'look' or smile' when you're just trying to get the words down, I wouldn't want to break the flow by going to look up alternatives for one word, but what a great resource to have on hand when you're fleshing out. I'm sure after one or two edits like this it'll start to become second nature in the initial writing phase as well.

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    Offline Simp

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    Re: Do your characters shrug too often?
    « Reply #79 on: January 17, 2017, 05:57:29 am »
    My characters nod.  I've been working them through some other gestures, but their heads still bob up and down like a buoy.

    Also, thanks for the lists.  I've got them all bookmarked.

    I like to say "blast" or "blast it". I picked it up from a quirky girl in high school. I also use "dang" and "dang it" a lot. I also use "oh my goodness". The benefit of using "clean" expletives is that you never have to watch your language around anyone.


    I still say Sugar Plum Faries on occasion.  I love the "sh" word, but tried to curb my sailor mouth when my son was young.  I would catch myself mid-curse and the flip the switch to Shhhhh-ugar Plum Faries.   My husband still cracks up when I shout it out.

    Offline plumstead

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    Re: Do your characters shrug too often?
    « Reply #80 on: January 17, 2017, 06:39:38 am »
    I have a character who hesitates and pauses before speaking. Trying to replace those with the likes of "he rubbed the back of his neck" and "he pursed his lips".

    My favourite non-swear swear is "for Pete's sake!" or "oh, for the love of Pete!" It got a bit awkward when my 3-year-old met my husband's friend, Pete. "Mom, do you love Daddy as much as you love Pete?"  :o

    Offline Sapphire

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    Re: Do your characters shrug too often?
    « Reply #81 on: January 17, 2017, 07:20:40 am »
    GrandmaBirdie, thank you. This is one of the best threads I've come across on WC in weeks! I have bookmarked for my own use printed out several of the lists to share with my critique group. We had a discussion on this topic only a few days ago.
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    Offline GrandmaBirdie

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    Re: Do your characters shrug too often?
    « Reply #82 on: January 17, 2017, 07:46:26 am »
    My favourite non-swear swear is "for Pete's sake!" or "oh, for the love of Pete!" It got a bit awkward when my 3-year-old met my husband's friend, Pete. "Mom, do you love Daddy as much as you love Pete?"  :o

    That's priceless. I hope you use it in one of your books.

    Offline GrandmaBirdie

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    Re: Do your characters shrug too often?
    « Reply #83 on: January 17, 2017, 07:47:41 am »
    GrandmaBirdie, thank you. This is one of the best threads I've come across on WC in weeks! I have bookmarked for my own use printed out several of the lists to share with my critique group. We had a discussion on this topic only a few days ago.

    My pleasure.

    Anything on your wishlist for future posts?

    Offline scott.marmorstein

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    Re: Do your characters shrug too often?
    « Reply #84 on: January 17, 2017, 08:15:51 am »
    Hmm, my characters make a lot of facial expressions, but not any shrugging or rubbing backs of necks. I guess my characters have so far been honest in their intentions... Something for me to work on! :) Though they do swear actual profanities at times...yeah, some people don't like it.
    « Last Edit: January 17, 2017, 08:28:09 am by scott.marmorstein »

    Offline Debbie Bennett

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    Re: Do your characters shrug too often?
    « Reply #85 on: January 17, 2017, 09:22:35 am »
    YES. All of it. Way too often. I do a word count of shrug, nod and their derivatives and there are hundreds of them! then it takes me ages to read each one in context and change some of them. Still - better than having characters who just sit there and do nothing.....













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    Offline GrandmaBirdie

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    Re: Do your characters shrug too often?
    « Reply #86 on: January 17, 2017, 10:12:52 am »
    YES. All of it. Way too often. I do a word count of shrug, nod and their derivatives and there are hundreds of them! then it takes me ages to read each one in context and change some of them. Still - better than having characters who just sit there and do nothing.....

    By doing that, you can turn those weak spots into strong prose that readers will bookmark and quote on their blogs.

    Offline GrandmaBirdie

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    Do you take advantage of color in your writing? 1000 ways ...
    « Reply #87 on: January 23, 2017, 05:49:05 am »
    Why is color in writing so important?

    Pablo Picasso said, "Colors, like features, follow the changes of the emotions." Picasso was an artist who evoked emotion with colorful pigments. As a writer, you can do the same with colorful words.

    Over 1000 Ways to Describe Colors

    Offline mach 5

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    Re: Do you take advantage of color in your writing? 1000 ways ...
    « Reply #88 on: January 23, 2017, 06:29:26 am »
    Thank you, GB. That is wonderful and I appreciate the style note on hyphenating that ties into the overall topic. :)

    Offline GrandmaBirdie

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    Re: Do you take advantage of color in your writing? 1000 ways ...
    « Reply #89 on: January 23, 2017, 06:43:58 am »
    Thank you, GB. That is wonderful and I appreciate the style note on hyphenating that ties into the overall topic. :)

    Thanks, Mach. I encounter the hyphenation issue frequently when critiquing or editing. That tiny punctuation mark makes a huge difference when used correctly.

    Offline writerc

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    Re: Do you take advantage of color in your writing? 1000 ways ...
    « Reply #90 on: January 23, 2017, 08:35:59 am »
    Thankyou for this. Reminders like this help to keep me on my toes when writing :)

    Offline GrandmaBirdie

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    Re: Do you take advantage of color in your writing? 1000 ways ...
    « Reply #91 on: January 23, 2017, 09:10:19 am »
    Thankyou for this. Reminders like this help to keep me on my toes when writing :)

    My pleasure! I considered doing one on cliches, but I found so many that I realized it would take an entire book.

    Offline Jennifer Joy

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    Re: Do you take advantage of color in your writing? 1000 ways ...
    « Reply #92 on: January 23, 2017, 03:21:28 pm »
    I really enjoy your posts! Thank you so much for sharing, GrandmaBirdie!

    Jennifer Joy | jenniferjoywrites.com

    Offline GrandmaBirdie

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    Re: Do you take advantage of color in your writing? 1000 ways ...
    « Reply #93 on: January 23, 2017, 04:11:18 pm »
    I really enjoy your posts! Thank you so much for sharing, GrandmaBirdie!

    Thanks, Jennifer. I enjoy putting them together. Next week will be Over 300 Onomatopoeic Sound-Words.

    Offline EmmaS

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    Re: Do you take advantage of color in your writing? 1000 ways ...
    « Reply #94 on: January 23, 2017, 09:59:53 pm »
    Thanks, Jennifer. I enjoy putting them together. Next week will be Over 300 Onomatopoeic Sound-Words.
    Ooh, looking forward to that one! And thanks for this one, too. I haven't been using color words nearly as effectively as I could in my current WIP. Heading off to fiddle with some descriptions...

    Offline GrandmaBirdie

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    Do You Use Sound in Your Writing? Over 300 Onomatopoeic Sound-Words
    « Reply #95 on: January 30, 2017, 06:16:39 am »
    Well-chosen sounds give writing more oomph. Writers can describe sounds, or they can choose verbs and nouns that do the same. Check this list for ideas.

    Over 300 Onomatopoeic Sound-Words

    Offline R. T. Leone

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    Re: Do You Use Sound in Your Writing? Over 300 Onomatopoeic Sound-Words
    « Reply #96 on: January 30, 2017, 06:22:54 am »
    Very interesting stuff--it was just a month or so ago I was trying to find a way to describe the sound of glass breaking.

    Thanks Grandma!

    Offline Robertson

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    Re: Do You Use Sound in Your Writing? Over 300 Onomatopoeic Sound-Words
    « Reply #97 on: January 30, 2017, 06:28:23 am »
    Absolutely!  As a songwriter, the sound of words is hugely influential for me.

    Great list of words, I will definitely check it when stuck.  Thank you!

    Offline GrandmaBirdie

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    Re: Do You Use Sound in Your Writing? Over 300 Onomatopoeic Sound-Words
    « Reply #98 on: January 30, 2017, 06:33:20 am »
    Great list of words, I will definitely check it when stuck.  Thank you!

    Thanks Grandma!

    My pleasure! I enjoyed researching the words for this post.

    Offline Rachel E. Rice

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    Re: Do You Use Sound in Your Writing? Over 300 Onomatopoeic Sound-Words
    « Reply #99 on: January 30, 2017, 06:53:04 am »
    Thank you. This is a helpful list for a writer.
    « Last Edit: January 30, 2017, 06:56:22 am by Rachel E. Rice »


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