Author Topic: February 2018 - Headline KENPC Rate 0.0046601USD  (Read 9518 times)  

Offline Amanda M. Lee

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Re: February 2018 - Headline KENPC Rate 0.0046601USD
« Reply #100 on: March 19, 2018, 06:41:34 am »
Generally the print count is HIGHER thn the KU count. But for some authors it's the opposite. I assume because you format your print book in smaller font or something.

But while we're on this topic, how ridiculous that they can't even tell you what your page count in KU even is. You have to figure it out yourself.

And you meant to be offensive, but that's okay  :P  I'm pretty much impossible to offend so don't worry about it.
Ive never seen anyones print count higher than their KENPC. As for them telling you your count, they do. You just have to click on the page to see it.

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    Offline Used To Be BH

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    Re: February 2018 - Headline KENPC Rate 0.0046601USD
    « Reply #101 on: March 19, 2018, 08:14:51 am »
    The only generalization that hold true in self-publishing is that few things work equally well for all authors. (I say few because there are some, like writing well, that should work for anyone. Marketing strategies--not so much.)

    Reading enough threads on Kboards has given me many insights, including the following:

    AMS ads work--or they don't. You can achieve a positive ROI--or you can't. The same thing with FB ads. Giving away free books helps--or it doesn't. Regardless of the topic, it's not hard to find anecdotal stories of success--and failure--for pretty much any strategy. Doubtless, some people execute a strategy better than others, but the wide variation even among successful authors suggests author skill is not the variable in play.

    As I've said before, we don't have much beyond analytical data to work with. We don't have--and probably never will--enough data to judge what's true in general. All we can do is experiment and see what works for us.

    Obviously, there are authors who've found success going wide. Others have found success in KU. We've heard from both types of authors in this thread. I don't see how anyone can keep arguing that one size fits all. What evidence we have just doesn't fit that narrative.

    To Seneca's argument that anyone who could be successful in KU could be more successful going wide, the data doesn't support that. Wide isn't automatically a losing proposition by any means, but because it doesn't work equally well for everyone, there are probably a lot of variables in play. Without knowing what they are, not everyone can necessarily succeed that way. The fact is that selling at a high enough volume at a lower price point can bring in more money than selling at lower volume with a higher price point. Similarly, getting enough KU borrows can make more money than one could with a lesser number of sales. Trading the KU market for the wide one, which is only slightly larger, doesn't always yield better results. Phoenix's example supports all these points.

    I'm a prawn, but I've tested wide twice, each time for several months, and I was greeted by crickets both times. When I built an ad campaign around another venue, I got no sales. (Best I could manage was to give books away on Smashwords.) When I used a promoter who advertised to all the major venues, I got sales only on Amazon. My revenue from several months of wide doesn't typically equally what I can make in one month in KU. I could be an outlier, of course, but at least I know what seems to work for me. I agree with the point about diversifying being a good business strategy in general, so I'm moving some books into wide, just in case. Moving everything into wide, if it played out as it has before, would simply result in my throwing half to two-thirds of my income out the window and getting back a fraction of that.

    To the argument that we need to move out of KU to keep Amazon from getting a monopoly, I've been hearing we needed to go wide to that ever since 2012, and I've never really bought that argument. Individual indie authors just don't have that much clout, and there's no way indies will move out en masse. The ones least likely to move would be the ones doing high volume in KU, and those are really the only ones Amazon cares about keeping. It's also worth noting that we don't know exactly how many people are in KU in the first place. It seems a fairly large number of authors, some of them big names, have gone wide, but that hasn't slowed Amazon's roll.

    I don't think the reason Amazon has picked up market share has that much to do with indie authors. Avid readers would still be buying books even if KDP had never existed. Amazon's share keeps growing for a wide variety of reasons, including convenience. (Never underestimate the lure of one-stop shopping, free second-day air for prime subscribers, easy return policy, wide selection, etc.) The other outlets would have a hard time matching the one-stop shopping appeal, but they could have been more competitive in other respects. For whatever reason, they simply chose not to make a real effort. They haven't even made much of an effort to appeal to indie authors, which, if we were as important as the monopoly argument seems to assume, they would have. Several examples have been given in this thread alone to illustrate how little they actually seem interested in wooing us. At the risk of repeating myself, indie authors can be in KU or be wide without appreciably affecting Amazon market share unless the other outlets can grab a bigger percentage of the market to begin with. If people aren't shopping that often at Barnes and Noble, for example, it doesn't matter whether it has no indies or is stuffed with them. The only way indies make a real difference in the balance is having enough traffic at the other sites to make those indies discoverable in the first place. And the only way wide will become more universally appealing  will be if that traffic increases. The relatively low traffic at the other store fronts is one reason some authors find wide less rewarding.

     
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    Offline Usedtoposthere

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    Re: February 2018 - Headline KENPC Rate 0.0046601USD
    « Reply #102 on: March 19, 2018, 08:27:54 am »
    The only generalization that hold true in self-publishing is that few things work equally well for all authors. (I say few because there are some, like writing well, that should work for anyone. Marketing strategies--not so much.)

    Reading enough threads on Kboards has given me many insights, including the following:

    AMS ads work--or they don't. You can achieve a positive ROI--or you can't. The same thing with FB ads. Giving away free books helps--or it doesn't. Regardless of the topic, it's not hard to find anecdotal stories of success--and failure--for pretty much any strategy. Doubtless, some people execute a strategy better than others, but the wide variation even among successful authors suggests author skill is not the variable in play.

    As I've said before, we don't have much beyond analytical data to work with. We don't have--and probably never will--enough data to judge what's true in general. All we can do is experiment and see what works for us.

    Obviously, there are authors who've found success going wide. Others have found success in KU. We've heard from both types of authors in this thread. I don't see how anyone can keep arguing that one size fits all. What evidence we have just doesn't fit that narrative.

    To Seneca's argument that anyone who could be successful in KU could be more successful going wide, the data doesn't support that. Wide isn't automatically a losing proposition by any means, but because it doesn't work equally well for everyone, there are probably a lot of variables in play. Without knowing what they are, not everyone can necessarily succeed that way. The fact is that selling at a high enough volume at a lower price point can bring in more money than selling at lower volume with a higher price point. Similarly, getting enough KU borrows can make more money than one could with a lesser number of sales. Trading the KU market for the wide one, which is only slightly larger, doesn't always yield better results. Phoenix's example supports all these points.

    I'm a prawn, but I've tested wide twice, each time for several months, and I was greeted by crickets both times. When I built an ad campaign around another venue, I got no sales. (Best I could manage was to give books away on Smashwords.) When I used a promoter who advertised to all the major venues, I got sales only on Amazon. My revenue from several months of wide doesn't typically equally what I can make in one month in KU. I could be an outlier, of course, but at least I know what seems to work for me. I agree with the point about diversifying being a good business strategy in general, so I'm moving some books into wide, just in case. Moving everything into wide, if it played out as it has before, would simply result in my throwing half to two-thirds of my income out the window and getting back a fraction of that.

    To the argument that we need to move out of KU to keep Amazon from getting a monopoly, I've been hearing we needed to go wide to that ever since 2012, and I've never really bought that argument. Individual indie authors just don't have that much clout, and there's no way indies will move out en masse. The ones least likely to move would be the ones doing high volume in KU, and those are really the only ones Amazon cares about keeping. It's also worth noting that we don't know exactly how many people are in KU in the first place. It seems a fairly large number of authors, some of them big names, have gone wide, but that hasn't slowed Amazon's roll.

    I don't think the reason Amazon has picked up market share has that much to do with indie authors. Avid readers would still be buying books even if KDP had never existed. Amazon's share keeps growing for a wide variety of reasons, including convenience. (Never underestimate the lure of one-stop shopping, free second-day air for prime subscribers, easy return policy, wide selection, etc.) The other outlets would have a hard time matching the one-stop shopping appeal, but they could have been more competitive in other respects. For whatever reason, they simply chose not to make a real effort. They haven't even made much of an effort to appeal to indie authors, which, if we were as important as the monopoly argument seems to assume, they would have. Several examples have been given in this thread alone to illustrate how little they actually seem interested in wooing us. At the risk of repeating myself, indie authors can be in KU or be wide without appreciably affecting Amazon market share unless the other outlets can grab a bigger percentage of the market to begin with. If people aren't shopping that often at Barnes and Noble, for example, it doesn't matter whether it has no indies or is stuffed with them. The only way indies make a real difference in the balance is having enough traffic at the other sites to make those indies discoverable in the first place. And the only way wide will become more universally appealing  will be if that traffic increases. The relatively low traffic at the other store fronts is one reason some authors find wide less rewarding.

     
    That was such an excellent, logical analysis that I had to repeat it! Good stuff. Off to write some more tripe for my lowest common denominator readers. *tips hat*

    Offline Rick Partlow

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    Re: February 2018 - Headline KENPC Rate 0.0046601USD
    « Reply #103 on: March 19, 2018, 08:33:09 am »
    The only generalization that hold true in self-publishing is that few things work equally well for all authors. (snipped for brevity)

    Very well put, Bill.  One might think you were a writer or something...   ;D

    Offline Not any more

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    Re: February 2018 - Headline KENPC Rate 0.0046601USD
    « Reply #104 on: March 19, 2018, 08:52:22 am »
    My new novel just hit #8 on the Top 100 list in its genre on Amazon. Of the 20 books on the front page of that list, 17 are in KU. Of the others, two are trad pubbed, including the one by a guy named Stephen King. Now some people would have me ditch KU and go wide just because THEY don't like Amazon. As soon as someone offers to make my mortgage payments while I engage in their little experiment, I'll consider it.
    This post remains on KBoards over my objections.

    Offline Used To Be BH

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    Re: February 2018 - Headline KENPC Rate 0.0046601USD
    « Reply #105 on: March 19, 2018, 11:20:10 am »
    Again, encouraging authors to be wide isn't about trying to change Amazon's behavior. It's about trying to encourage the other retailers to keep giving indie authors a place to sell and to encourage them to do more. True, they don't seem all that interested currently, but wouldn't gaining more and more indie authors (and seeing them/us sell) do more to make them take notice than us abandoning their stores altogether?

    Still, reading this thread has made me think more about trying KU if/when I have a book/series that seems suited to that market. It would be interesting to have another thread to dig down into what particular types of books (genre/subgenre/tone/tropes) do best in KU and don't seem to do well wide.
    I agree abandoning them completely isn't giving them much of an incentive, but I don't think anyone's advocating that. Some of us are just expressing the idea that KU might work better for some people.

    I really do believe the sweet spot may be having at least one series in KU and at least one series wide. (That idea's not original; I've heard it floated before.) Until recently, I haven't had enough books to do that kind of experiment, but now, with one series finished, two others started, and a fourth on the way, I can put at least one of those series wide. Even if I don't make as much on the wide books, I still have the others pulling in page reads, and I'm building a brand in other stores. If the balance changes, and wide begins to pick up steam, I'll be in a position to know it and take advantage of it. If not, I haven't lost that much.
    I have not consented to the new Terms of Service, which were implemented without any announcement and without the ability to accept or reject them. My continued participation on the forum is related only to addressing this issue and cannot be construed as implied consent.  9/19/2018

    Offline Amanda M. Lee

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    Re: February 2018 - Headline KENPC Rate 0.0046601USD
    « Reply #106 on: March 19, 2018, 11:36:59 am »
    You do have to enroll the book in Select before they reveal the KENPC. (I've had books in and know where to find the info, and now that they're out, that whole section is gone.) It's decision-making information that Amazon withholds until after you're contractually obligated for 90 days.
    I believe there's a three-day grace period. So you can see it and if you're not happy you can pull out.

    Amanda M. Lee

    Offline Ryan W. Mueller

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    Re: February 2018 - Headline KENPC Rate 0.0046601USD
    « Reply #107 on: March 19, 2018, 12:00:13 pm »
    It's also very easy to get a rough estimate of your KENP. It's roughly 200 words per KENP page, so if you wrote a 100k book, that's 500 KENP.

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    Offline Marti talbott

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    Re: February 2018 - Headline KENPC Rate 0.0046601USD
    « Reply #108 on: March 19, 2018, 08:30:55 pm »
    So one month in, it looks like putting the 15 books that weren't selling well wide was a good idea. So far, I have 81,448 (approximately $374 I think) page reads compared to only 19 (approximately $57) full price sales on booksellers other than Amazon. Aside from the page reads, I have racked up 187 full price sales on Amazon too, so at least it looks like KU isn't hurting my normal Amazon sales.

    The rest of my 37 books are still wide and making about the same as they usually do. I'm tempted...but I going to wait to see if these 15 can support me while I put the rest in, considering it will take time for readers to find them. Right?
    Based on an actual event: The 1909 Dotsero Train Wreck https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B084H4Z23C/ref=dbs_a_def_rwt_hsch_vapi_tkin_p6_i5

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    Offline Ann in Arlington

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    Re: February 2018 - Headline KENPC Rate 0.0046601USD
    « Reply #109 on: March 20, 2018, 03:24:00 am »
    locked for review -- there have been some political comments and we need to do some clean up -- as a reminder: political discussions are not allowed here.


    Edit to update: Okay, I've deleted some content and removed all political discussion. However, we feel it has run the course now.
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