Author Topic: I do not consent to the current ToS which was modified without my consent  (Read 2952 times)  

Offline Sam Kates

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Re: Do Americans say gobsmacked?
« Reply #50 on: June 09, 2018, 01:58:48 am »
Yay, me too :) Hello fellow Welshie!

Shwmae, Butt.  :)

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    Online jb1111

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    Re: Do Americans say gobsmacked?
    « Reply #51 on: June 09, 2018, 02:32:59 am »
    As I understand it (partly from experience), the pavement across the pond is the street. Here (all along the Eastern Seaboard of the US where I've lived, at least) the pavement is a synonym for sidewalk.

    I could be wrong. I often am.  :)

    Where I live, "pavement" is the material a street, sidewalk, or driveway is made from -- be it tarmac, asphalt, or concrete.

    So, the word "pavement" itself can mean a street, sidewalk, driveway, parking lot -- or whatever. You're referring to the material.

    Offline Jena H

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    Re: Do Americans say gobsmacked?
    « Reply #52 on: June 09, 2018, 05:32:18 am »
    Where I live, "pavement" is the material a street, sidewalk, or driveway is made from -- be it tarmac, asphalt, or concrete.

    So, the word "pavement" itself can mean a street, sidewalk, driveway, parking lot -- or whatever. You're referring to the material.

    I agree w/ this.

    BTW, there's a saying that might be exclusively American, but the saying is "pounding the pavement."  This is almost always used to mean that one is looking for a job, as in walking the streets putting in applications, etc.  "He got laid off last week so he's been pounding the pavement."  (Even though that's not how people look for jobs anymore.   :P )
    Jena

    Offline Shelley K

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    Re: Do Americans say gobsmacked?
    « Reply #53 on: June 09, 2018, 11:47:44 am »
    This American says it. I also say gadzooks, gee whillickers and heavens to murgatroid, so I'm probably not a great representation of average American conversational English.

    Offline Jan Hurst-Nicholson

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    Re: Do Americans say gobsmacked?
    « Reply #54 on: June 09, 2018, 11:54:20 am »
    This American says it. I also say gadzooks, gee whillickers and heavens to murgatroid, so I'm probably not a great representation of average American conversational English.

    What about 'aw shucks'?  :D

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    Offline Shelley K

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    Re: Do Americans say gobsmacked?
    « Reply #55 on: June 09, 2018, 12:13:51 pm »
    What about 'aw shucks'?  :D

    Shore thang!

    I'm a rural girl. I can write proper English, but sometimes I say how are yous doin'? when talking to more than one person. Victim of my environment.
    « Last Edit: June 09, 2018, 12:15:50 pm by Shelley K »

    Offline geronl

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    Re: Do Americans say gobsmacked?
    « Reply #56 on: June 09, 2018, 01:22:44 pm »
    Watching brit-coms (Chef!) tells me that "plaster" is the British word for band-aid.

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    Offline Jan Hurst-Nicholson

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    Re: Do Americans say gobsmacked?
    « Reply #57 on: June 09, 2018, 11:48:47 pm »
    Watching brit-coms (Chef!) tells me that "plaster" is the British word for band-aid.

    Correct. And if you get plastered you're very drunk  ;D

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    Offline Doglover

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    Re: Do Americans say gobsmacked?
    « Reply #58 on: June 10, 2018, 01:15:18 am »
    Londoner here. I'm not sure if this is where it originates, but Londoners use the word 'gob' to describe a mouth i.e. 'shut your bleedin' gob'. So gobsmacked has always appeared to me to be logically an English word describing when one is so astonished that one has nothing to say, the the gob or mouth is smacked shut. Often in films or cartoons we see someone smacking their own mouth when enlightenment appears.


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    Offline Doglover

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    Re: Do Americans say gobsmacked?
    « Reply #59 on: June 10, 2018, 01:16:18 am »
    I think it is fairly recent (post 1970s) as I never heard it before I left the UK in the 1970s. I don't hear it spoken here in SA, but I do see it in the UK newspapers we get here. I thought it was sort of going out of fashion now  ::).
    My dad used it and he was born in 1904.


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    Offline oldatlantapublishing

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    Re: Do Americans say gobsmacked?
    « Reply #60 on: June 10, 2018, 04:20:24 am »
    Do Americans say gobsmacked?  ...No. In fact I believe it would be offensive in a funny way. I believe I'm going to start using it and see what happens.   :D

    Offline Escapee

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    Re: Do Americans say gobsmacked?
    « Reply #61 on: June 10, 2018, 05:32:32 am »
    I'm in Australia and had to laugh when I heard 'gobsmacked' used on the news tonight. It's still alive and well here :D

    Offline Jena H

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    Re: Do Americans say gobsmacked?
    « Reply #62 on: June 10, 2018, 03:21:28 pm »
    Do Americans say gobsmacked?  ...No. In fact I believe it would be offensive in a funny way. I believe I'm going to start using it and see what happens.   :D

    You may not have read all the replies to this thread from Americans, most of whom have not only heard the word (at least occasionally), but haven't expressed any offense.
    Jena

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