Author Topic: How Much has Writing Spoiled Your Reading?  (Read 1406 times)  

Offline Connor S Caple

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Re: How Much has Writing Spoiled Your Reading?
« Reply #25 on: December 01, 2019, 03:42:57 am »
Okay, so it may be mostly age related.
You only have 5 years on me, so I doubt that's it  :P
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    Offline J. A. Wallace

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    Re: How Much has Writing Spoiled Your Reading?
    « Reply #26 on: December 01, 2019, 07:31:24 am »
    Before I began writing my mystery series, I read an average of four books each week. Since publishing, I'm having great difficulty settling down and enjoying a good read. I understand this is not unusual. It is frustrating, though.

    Offline Arches

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    Re: How Much has Writing Spoiled Your Reading?
    « Reply #27 on: December 01, 2019, 08:14:26 am »
    Al, as you mentioned, I find it a lot harder these days to become engrossed in a novel than before. What I've found is that I get the same pleasure from writing that comes from reading.

    On the plus side, writing a novel takes far longer than reading one, so the pleasure of writing lasts longer. On the downside, I can't write constantly. I read novels for pleasure almost every day, usually when I'm too tired to write.

    Offline CaptnAndy

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    Re: How Much has Writing Spoiled Your Reading?
    « Reply #28 on: December 01, 2019, 10:30:20 am »
    I have been an insatiable reader since I was 11. I got serious about writing after retiring for the 4th time in 2011. 18 books later, at 75, I still enjoy reading whatever strikes my fancy, including spending 3-4 hours of research daily on the net. My vision is shot, I have to use a 38" monitor, so my Kindle is the only way I can now read books. My wife insists on driving, so I take my Kindle when we are out and about. I also spend the 2 hours before bed reading to wind down.
    I do notice problems in some books, but try not to let them ruin the story. Although my memory is not so good, I believe reading helps keep my mind sharp.
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    Offline TromboneAl

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    Re: How Much has Writing Spoiled Your Reading?
    « Reply #29 on: December 01, 2019, 05:41:54 pm »
    Although my memory is not so good, I believe reading helps keep my mind sharp.

    My mom always loved reading. When she was ninety-two, she'd finish a book, and we'd give it back to her, and she'd read it again without realizing she'd just read it.

    I greatly appreciate the ability, with my Kindle, to search for a character name and remind myself who it is. I also make notes about every book I read (or abandon) in GoodReads. For example: "Man kills preacher, mistakenly believing he had sex with his wife."
     
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    Offline marissa_lopez

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    Re: How Much has Writing Spoiled Your Reading?
    « Reply #30 on: December 02, 2019, 04:36:14 am »
    I used reading to enrich my writing but I didnt start off that way. I didnt really know how to study books until I read an article by KM Weiland on how to study stories. Then I started reading as a writer. Over time I have learned to separate my analytical side from my reading for pleasure side. I find that I am eager to read more books in my genre because the more I read the more it helped me plot

    Offline notjohn

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    Re: How Much has Writing Spoiled Your Reading?
    « Reply #31 on: December 02, 2019, 05:26:23 am »
    When I was young, it was quite the other way around: reading spoiled the writing. I'd read Thomas Pynchon and immediately begin doing the black-humor thing. Hemingway would make me pull up my socks and become laconic. Etc.

    At first I was puzzled by "DNF" -- don't finish, I suppose? With me, I'm more likely not to begin. In college I devoured The New Yorker fiction of the day. Today I'm not even tempted to read a line of it.
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    Offline Andy_Blinston

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    Re: How Much has Writing Spoiled Your Reading?
    « Reply #32 on: December 03, 2019, 06:26:51 am »
    To be honest, I tend to read good fantasy authors and I like reading less now because I can't stop focusing on how much better I think they are at writing than me  ???


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    Offline Carol Davis

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    Re: How Much has Writing Spoiled Your Reading?
    « Reply #33 on: December 03, 2019, 11:39:17 am »
    Writing hasn't spoiled my reading, because I've been a writer basically all my life, so that background has always been in place.

    What did spoil reading for me was working 5 years as a copy editor/proofreader. Most of the time, I'm unable to turn off "Edit Mode" in my head. I'm not speaking from a developmental standpoint, because I can find things to enjoy even in a very clumsily constructed story. But spelling, punctuation and grammatical mistakes DRIVE ME INSANE. They pull me right out of the story. Instantly. Every damn time.

    That's not just indies, either. I've read several trad published books recently that must have been proofread by a blind Chihuahua.







    Offline EmberKent

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    Re: How Much has Writing Spoiled Your Reading?
    « Reply #34 on: December 03, 2019, 12:49:26 pm »
    Writing hasn't spoiled my reading, because I've been a writer basically all my life, so that background has always been in place.

    What did spoil reading for me was working 5 years as a copy editor/proofreader. Most of the time, I'm unable to turn off "Edit Mode" in my head. I'm not speaking from a developmental standpoint, because I can find things to enjoy even in a very clumsily constructed story. But spelling, punctuation and grammatical mistakes DRIVE ME INSANE. They pull me right out of the story. Instantly. Every damn time.

    That's not just indies, either. I've read several trad published books recently that must have been proofread by a blind Chihuahua.

    This is a difficult one. When I first started editing I never thought I'd be bothered by errors while reading. And for the most part, that's sort of true. Just about any book will have a handful of errors and that doesn't bug me. But occasionally I'll read a book that has errors on almost every single page, even on a smaller screen, and I'll find myself annoyed.

    It is silly, really. I mean, the story might be just fine. It might even be good. But if there are dozens of errors that can be noted in a casual read, it feels... I don't know. A little insulting? Like the author doesn't care. And this shouldn't matter to my enjoyment, but it does.

    Writing itself hasn't spoiled my reading. Thankfully, my reading is pretty detached from my activities. It's instead attached to my mood. Which could maybe be worse, depending on the perspective.

    If anything, writing enhances my reading. It's fun to read something and then notice similarities between what someone else has written and what you've written. A subtle, indirect way of showing relatability between two individuals.

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