Author Topic: curious about country habits - what have you observed (Canada..for e.g.)  (Read 1116 times)  

Online jm2019

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I'm tweaking and tuning my ads as I target specific countries. So far, I seem to have reached a decent engagement and conversion with US and UK. You could say that the market is large enough and I shouldn't bother about the rest, and that's certainly a fair point and I might do that, but I am testing other international waters. All my books are only on Amazon and I do not intend to go wide just yet.

- What about Canada? Do Canadians buy from the US store? (I see many Canada visits to my site, but see a disproportionally low purchase rates. Could it be that they buy on the US store and the purchase is mixed up?)

- India? Just started addressing that market - I'm getting many clicks at really low rates, but it could also be that conversion may turn out to be very low - too early to tell, but curious to hear other opinions

- Any other countries with decent reception to English language books (I've read that AUS converts poorly on Amazon) - in Europe for example.
« Last Edit: May 20, 2020, 12:35:11 pm by jm2019 »

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    Offline ImaWriter

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    I'm Canadian and buy from from the US store. It took forever for Kindle to make it to Canada so two things happened. People went with the US store and just stayed there despite Amazon pestering us to move our libraries. Or, more likely, readers said screw Amazon and went with Kobo, which was the homegrown option. And even though Kobo was eventually sold, they have a huge foothold here.

    Offline ShayneRutherford

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    I'm Canadian and buy from from the US store. It took forever for Kindle to make it to Canada so two things happened. People went with the US store and just stayed there despite Amazon pestering us to move our libraries. Or, more likely, readers said screw Amazon and went with Kobo, which was the homegrown option. And even though Kobo was eventually sold, they have a huge foothold here.

    Yep. I'm Canadian, and I buy from the US store. I had a Kobo, way back when they first came out, but it sucked, so I got a Kindle as soon as they became available here. I've thought about moving over to Kobo now that their e-readers are better, but I'm very particular, and I don't want my libraries split across two devices, so I stick with Kindle.
             

    Offline EmberKent

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    How are you guys buying from the US site? Mine replaces the buying options with a redirect to .ca. I can't even gift ebooks to people in the US (a feature only available on .com).

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    I also kept my account with the US store so I buy ebooks from there.

    Offline ShayneRutherford

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    How are you guys buying from the US site? Mine replaces the buying options with a redirect to .ca. I can't even gift ebooks to people in the US (a feature only available on .com).

    Go to Manage Your Content And Devices > Preferences > Country and Region Settings, and then switch back to the .com store.
             

    Offline Brevoort

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    - What about Canada? Do Canadians buy from the US store? (I see many Canada visits to my site, but see a disproportionally low purchase rates. Could it be that they buy on the US store and the purchase is mixed up?)

    Kobo really has a good hold on the Canadian market because Amazon was very slow to set up ebook buying. Kobo also benefited from its corporate ties with the main bookselling chain, Chapters-Indigo. Now that Kobo is a separate company it holds onto quite a chunk of the domestic market.

    I maintain my U-S Amazon account for ebooks because for the longest time not all books were available in the Canadian version of Amazon after they started selling ebooks.

    I use a Kobo reader(s) because I can just bung any old epub book into it whereas I have to do a dance with Calibre to read them on my Kindle(s)
    Rick Grant
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    Offline notjohn

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    Yeah, I've always been shocked at how few books Canadians and the Dutch buy from me! (I see I have an NL payment due next week. That will be a first!) As others have pointed out, Kobo got there first, and for some years Brits and Canadians and indeed anyone who wanted Kindle editions had to have an account on the US store. Since US prices are generally cheaper, why give up a good thing? I am reassured that some of my "missing" CA sales may actually be reflected on the US store.

    (Recall that the first KIndle deliveries were by "Whispersynch," a fancy name for telephone data, and that a significant chunk of the Canadian population lives within reach of American cell towers.)
    Notjohn's Guide to E-Book & Print Formatting: http://viewbook.at/notjohn

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    Online jm2019

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    Thank you all for the replies. Very interesting - guess I won't turn off the Canada targeting on my ads then :)

    I will report back on what I discover from the India experiment - what I'm seeing is a healthy engagement at very low click rates (1/10th of my other click rates!) I will give it a few days to see if it translates to sales or page reads. If nothing else, the engagement on the ad is going me additional shares and clicks, so why not? (I'm spending like 3$/day)


    Offline markpauloleksiw

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    Canadian marketplace was dominated by Chapters Indigo and one particular individual with strong political connections. Hence, Amazon was totally blocked out. Chapter/Indigo had an interest in Kobo for many years until selling. It has taken a long time for Amazon to establish a presence in Canada.

    Most Canadian book buyers go to Chapters/Indigo or Kobo as a result. You still CANNOT advertise on amazon.ca for KDP as you can almost anywhere else. So as a Canadian author I cannot even make much of dent in Canada.

    Also, from my experience, the Canadian book establishment remains very biased against self-publishers and independent authors...you could say elitist.

    Mark

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    You still CANNOT advertise on amazon.ca for KDP as you can almost anywhere else. So as a Canadian author I cannot even make much of dent in Canada.

    Also, from my experience, the Canadian book establishment remains very biased against self-publishers and independent authors...you could say elitist.

    Mark

    Technically you can if you were lucky enough to snag an Advantage account. I've been advertising in Canada for over a year now. I also haven't found our fellow Canadians to be elitist at all. I earned nearly 5 figures there last December.

    It is, however, a slower market so it has very big peaks and valleys. It's usually 4th or 5th for me as far as marketplaces.
    « Last Edit: May 21, 2020, 09:54:26 am by 鬼 »

    Offline markpauloleksiw

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    To clarify. Canadian book buyers are not elitist. I am referring to the publishing establishment. It is pretty much run by academics.

    Getting an Advantage account is a pain in the rear end.

    Mark

    Online Corvid

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    To clarify. Canadian book buyers are not elitist. I am referring to the publishing establishment. It is pretty much run by academics.

    Getting an Advantage account is a pain in the rear end.

    Mark

    It's true, Canada's a media racket, and absolutely elitist. The power brokers all swim in the same small pond. Canadian companies, the CRTC, the CBC, politicians... all part of the same club, and they excel at protecting their own.

    I'm amazed Amazon and Netflix have managed to thrive here in the first place. Mind you, that hasn't happened without a significant amount of effort on their part to dodge the obstacles lobbed at them by the Bell's and Chapters-Indigo's of the world.


    Offline notjohn

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     So  how does one get books on Chapters/Indigo? I'd never heard of it before today.
    Notjohn's Guide to E-Book & Print Formatting: http://viewbook.at/notjohn

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    Offline markpauloleksiw

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    If you are distributed with Ingram you get into their distribution and after about 6-8 weeks your book should appear on the Chapters/Indigo site.  It is similar to Barnes and Noble where a buyer won't find your book in a physical store but can order online.

    Indigo has a monopoly in Canada on bricks and mortar book stores. There are very few independent book stores left.

    Mark


    Offline ShayneRutherford

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    So  how does one get books on Chapters/Indigo? I'd never heard of it before today.

    You can publish your ebooks on Kobo Writing Life. https://www.kobo.com/us/en/p/writinglife
             

    Offline ShayneRutherford

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    To clarify. Canadian book buyers are not elitist. I am referring to the publishing establishment. It is pretty much run by academics.

    Getting an Advantage account is a pain in the rear end.

    Mark

    It's true, Canada's a media racket, and absolutely elitist. The power brokers all swim in the same small pond. Canadian companies, the CRTC, the CBC, politicians... all part of the same club, and they excel at protecting their own.

    I'm amazed Amazon and Netflix have managed to thrive here in the first place. Mind you, that hasn't happened without a significant amount of effort on their part to dodge the obstacles lobbed at them by the Bell's and Chapters-Indigo's of the world.

    I think Mark was talking about the fact that the traditional publishers here in Canada are all about literature. I was thinking about doing an MFA when I graduated, but most of the programs are MAs rather than MFAs, and the few that are MFAs are all focused on literature rather than genre fiction.
             

    Offline markpauloleksiw

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    Way back I seriously considered going into Arts and majoring in Literature. What surprised me back in the day and still does even more so, is how much traditional Canadian publishers are still focused on historical issues and the same themes of years and years ago.  Canadian "english" literature was run for too long out of a couple of blocks in Toronto or the ivory towers of universities. French Canadian literature is far more dynamic.

    Amazon effectively rattled that cage and because the powers that be had ties to govt, they blocked Amazon out in the early 2000s which i believed seriously hurt Canadian literature from blossoming into multi-genres.

    Mark

    Offline ShayneRutherford

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    Way back I seriously considered going into Arts and majoring in Literature. What surprised me back in the day and still does even more so, is how much traditional Canadian publishers are still focused on historical issues and the same themes of years and years ago.  Canadian "english" literature was run for too long out of a couple of blocks in Toronto or the ivory towers of universities. French Canadian literature is far more dynamic.

    Amazon effectively rattled that cage and because the powers that be had ties to govt, they blocked Amazon out in the early 2000s which i believed seriously hurt Canadian literature from blossoming into multi-genres.

    Mark
    Im not sure how a store selling books would have changed the Canadian publishing landscape. Publishers here focus on literature and having a new store to sell those books in wasnt likely going to make publishers here any more open to genre fiction than they were in the past. If that were the case, Kobo would have had the same effect. But Canadian publishing remains the same snooty bastion of CanLit that its always been.
             

    Offline azebra

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    You can advertise in several Euro stores (DE, IT, FR). I find targeting popular English language books that are very like the book you are advertising, and using exact phrases, delivers the best results.

    Canada is my third best market about every second month, in close rivalry with Germany. 


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