Author Topic: The crux of the indie publishing problem, 2020 version: profitability  (Read 4782 times)  

Offline Patrick1980

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I was listening to the Sell More Books Show this week, and the hosts raised an issue that I've been thinking about a lot:

The problem is not selling our books. The problem is selling our books profitably.

Almost all of us can run ads, do promos, etc., and find ways to "move books". But at high PPC rates, doing so profitably is another matter.

I have books with solid 4.5 averages that don't sell unless I constantly run ads to them. With ads, they sell, but I sometimes find that I'm paying for people to read my books at the end of the day.

Or, as one of the Sell More Books Show hosts put it (I'm paraphrasing a bit): It's easy to make $100K nowadays, if you don't mind spending between $98K and $110K to do it.

Mark Dawson revealed earlier this year that he spent a whopping $500K on Amazon ads alone.

Anyone else feel this way? Or am I completely misreading the situation?

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    Online Patty Jansen

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    If you write books that enough people want to read, and you then collect those people on your mailing list, you don't need to spend nearly as much. I spend 10% of my income on ads. Max. This includes the cost of running my mailing list.

    Offline DmGuay

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    If you write books that enough people want to read, and you then collect those people on your mailing list, you don't need to spend nearly as much. I spend 10% of my income on ads. Max. This includes the cost of running my mailing list.

    I'm with Patty on this one.

    Yes, you need ads to some degree these days. Organic visibility is dead. But, it shouldn't be eating all of your profit. If it is, something is wrong.

    Thing is, learning an ad platform has a learning curve, and during that time, yes, you may be eating up more of your profits than you'd like. But hopefully, as you learn and tinker and optimize your ads, they will become less expensive and more profitable. (There are free classes out there, too, so you don't necessarily need to pay for knowledge. Like Bryan Cohen's 7 day Amazon ad challenge.)

    Also, sometimes we as authors--and I am guilty of this--keep throwing money at a series that will NEVER be profitable and will never sell well. Instead, we need to move on and write the next one. The better one that's easier to sell.
    « Last Edit: July 30, 2020, 08:08:09 am by DmGuay »
     
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    Offline Triceratops

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    A person on Reddit, handle "thewritingchair", says they made $23K in the first eight weeks of launching a new pen name, with zero advertising.

    Disclaimer: it ain't this person's first rodeo. In other posts they say they have been writing all their life, they write genre, and they write to market in a very no-BS focused way.

    If it's true, it is interesting.

    I barely bother with [ads] and make a very good living writing books.
    Anyone who tells you that success in this is heavily dependent on marketing just sucks as a writer. Cold hard truth there. If your books can't sell on their own, marketing ain't gonna change that.
    I stick with a mailing list (via mailerlite) that you sign up to in the back of the books, the same two ads on facebook that are like three years old now, the same AMS ads that are probably a year old by now.
    The best advertising is the next book - always.
    Marketing can work to earn more money but I maintain if your books aren't making money without it, throwing cash that way won't do anything.

    I started a new pen name last year, no ads, no mailing list and made $23K in the first eight weeks of publication. Sometimes I feel like starting a brand new name and doing the same just to reveal it on this sub.
    Quality rises, [crap] doesn't.

    Here's a guide I wrote two years ago about how to write to market to make money.
    In short, yes, this is how you make money in ePublishing. Write a series in a hungry genre to market and keep up the releases. As they pile up so do your royalties.
    It's exactly what I do. I took a year off and my royalties dropped from $100K to $75K.
    I'm going to keep my backlist size to myself so I'm not doxxed. At the moment I'm at about four to five novels a year.


    reddit.com/r/selfpublish/comments/hxxj7q/im_starting_to_give_up_on_the_advertising_part_of/

    Link to "guide" above: How to make money ePublishing (without a bestseller)

    reddit.com/r/writing/comments/6sam29/how_to_make_money_epublishing_without_a_bestseller/

    Offline markpauloleksiw

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    There are numerous variables.

    Genre plays a huge role in profitability.

    There are also too many "writers" out there following the same preached strategy and take the same courses telling them...if you spend they will come.

    These are only my views.

    1) The notion of "series" is diluting the marketplace. You might giveaway book 1 but how many will actually read it, let alone buy book 2. check out goodreads and see how many thousands of books are on peoples shelves that they never will read.

    2) You need to produce quality in the long term. Writing garbage eventually ends your career fast.

    3) If you are just starting...you need to invest in marketing, including paid editorial reviews (this depends on genre)

    4) What worked in 2012...won't work now and the people preaching tactics of years ago are misleading you.

    Mark

    Offline Douglas Milewski

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    For all the writers on the lower end, this has always been true. The virtuous spending cycle has never existed for us.

    Disclaimer: I sell horribly. Set your filters accordingly.

    Offline jm2019

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    @Triceratops - really interesting reddit link, thanks! While not everything there applies to me, it was still a great read.

    Regarding profitability - this has always been my #1 thought when I see big sales numbers or promos; are they actually profitable? It took a while for me to get to true profitability (i.e. profit = royalty - ad costs - annualized fixed expenses) and I keep a very tight control on it (and now the margins are healthy, even though my genre is not anywhere near the popular ones)...but it's been hard. In my case, I could get there only after my 4th book released. There was no way I'd be making profits on the basis of the 1st or the 2nd. I'm slowly building the mailing list but it's a grind (I'm in my year 1 so I guess it's a long journey, but still). If I were to stop ads tomorrow, my sales would drop to close to 0. That's just the reality. But it seems that with the right titles, a good set of ads, you can still have your books actually be profitable, even if you aren't at the stage where you can work off of your mailer lists.


    Offline edipet

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    I am absolutely 100% with Patty on this one.

    I am far from wealthy. But once or twice a year, thanks to income-tax rebate and other social rebates, I have some money to throw at advertising. That's when I experiment. I 'did' months where I spent on heavy-duty promo. ENT, RobinReads, BargainBooksy, FussyLibrarian, Boosends and tier II hitters. Stacked promo (one book per day on 3 or 4 sites)all month long, every day. Since I have more than 25 books  out, in several genres, I have a good variety to choose from for a whole month of advertising. I tried to keep the promo spending for the month to $1200-1500. Yep. That much. (if that year I did BookBub and was accepted, then all this layered promo spending did NOT happen; I never give away free books. I don't see the benefits or reason. The only one who benefits from indies is Amazon - to the tune of 65% because all those promo sites out there, will take your book if it's 0.99 and no higher)

    So, back to the experiment.

    Results were...interesting to say the least. Didn't matter which book or which series I was promoting. Those months where I spent $1,200 and up, I sold between 650-850 books that month in all categories; not just those promoted. The books that were reduced to 0.99 got the bulk of sales. Few if any fully-priced books were sold.

    I cut down on promo spending to $150-$300 per month - and the book sales went down to 70-150 per month. But same as before. ONLY those reduced to 0.99 were selling. So even my lowest $150/month did NOT yield any profit - Amazon made decent profit - 65% - as for me, well - at 0.35 per book to me, I did not.

    I've done this for the past 5 years. Not sufficiently long enough to be statistically valid, but enough to state with some authority that as long as indies are forced by Amazon (and thus all the promo sites) to promote their books at 0.99 and 0.35% royalties, they will NOT make a profit - ever. Sorry. It's the way the facts on my side line-up. And my 'experience' is empirical.

    I did a "BookBub" International last year. Cost around $300 - return around $120 - and no, it did not make its money back. Those who did this and made their money back, are fortune's children. I'm not one of them.

    I did a "BookBub" in thriller caregory. Biiiig money. Even 2 years ago it was big money for me. Just under$1,000 cost - that particular book was with a publisher back then. I was given a choice of "historical fiction" just over a thousand, or "thriller" just under a thousand. Any way you look  at it, big money for me. Naturally, the publisher wasn't going to spend a dime on advertising. The book did well in sales. Close to 6000 sales at 0.99. Amazon did extremely well. Out of $6,000 in sales they chopped off close to $4,000. That left $2,000 to go to the publisher, who took 60% of those royalties - I got $800. It DID NOT cover my BookBub ad. Not by a far shot.

    I've many more experiences like this. With trad pubs, small pubs and finally on my own, indie. It's why I tend to disbelieve any indie writer - especially a newcomer on the scene (doesn't matter how long they've been writing; I've been writing all my life; had 4 different trad publishers in that time too, 2 agents as well) - who claims to have made 25K or great profits when running BookBub or any other promotion.

    Disheartening as it is, everything Patti says is pretty much a norm for indie writers. Those who 'fall' outside of this norm, should consider themselves uncommonly lucky.

    I know one writer. We email back and forth. He wrote a book. His first. Thriller fiction. He was a journalist. Had many, many connections in the trade. He won a semi-recognizable 'prize' for the book; the kind you could stick on a cover. That got him a BookBub promotion. He sold close to 20,000 copies at 0.99 - and after Amazon took their cut, he ended up with just over $6,000 - profit. He sent me the KDP Payment screen shot, to convince me of his claim. He told me he could retire on $6,000 a month, every month. I told him that Amazon certainly could retire on $17,000+per month it made off him. Well, it shows that even people who've been in the pub-trade all their lives can be naive when it comes to indie scene. He wrote book 2, and disappeared off the scene; guess he couldn't believe his daily rankings in either books, post that massive BookBub success.

    In summary, for me, those months when I spend $150-250/month on advertising (money's tight lately), I will sell between 70 -150 books, and make about $50-$70 of it back in sales.

    Those months, when I can afford to shell out $1400 per month - I will sell close to 900 in books (all genres) and recoup about $350-400 of the advertising expenditure, leaving me at least $1,000 in the hole. Those indies out there who can talk about making profit with an honest straight look, are lucky. BUT most of us - the frightening large rest-of-us, can't and don't find our writing profitable. Not the way things stand. And no - I don't have any appreciable evidence of sell-through. Those who talk about it, invariably 'teach' marketing methods.


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    Offline Lorri Moulton [Lavender Lass Books]

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    I'm profitable, but that because I don't pay for advertising (except for the occasional Fussy Librarian promo).  I don't sell tons of books either...but I am not losing money.  I'm still trying organic and it's slowly working.  Emphasis on slowly.  8)

    Author of Romance, Fantasy, Mystery, Suspense and Historical Non-Fiction.
    Lavender Lass Books | Website | Amazon | Facebook | Twitter |YouTube | Pinterest | Instagram

    Offline Patrick1980

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    Thanks to all who replied.

    Patty: I'll definitely make a point to pick up your book on mailing list secrets. One thing I noticed, though: It looks like you've written so much that you can afford to give away at least half a dozen books (?) Wow.

    Edita: If I read your response correctly, you haven't found advertising profitable. I looked at your Amazon page. From what I can see, you're doing everything right. You've got great covers, series, and rave reviews. And you're still in a situation where you're running in the red on ads and promo campaigns. That suggests unwinnable economics rather than a problem with what you're doing(?)

    Mark Paul: I would be interested in knowing how you remain profitable. (To whatever extent you're willing to share, of course.) You have the more traditional type of author profile (prior to the indie boom and the overwhelming focus on series.) From what I can see, you have three standalone novels. That used to be very typical in before indie publishing. How do you balance high ad costs with standalones?

    Patty: It's good to know that 10% ad expenditure is the goal or the benchmark!



    Offline markpauloleksiw

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    Re: The crux of the indie publishing problem, 2020 version: profitability
    « Reply #10 on: July 30, 2020, 10:54:14 am »
    Happy to share.

    My first book was published in 2018. At the time, there was a learning curve for me so I wasted some money on editorial assessment etc...I realized after about 6 months that i need reviews, including editorial and brand awareness. So I made the decision to invest in AMS ads and got various editorial reviews. While I am not yet profitable, the gap has closed and now my first novel is showing on the paperback side with also boughts with the likes of John Green etc...

    What I accumulated over 2 years is data from my AMS ads. Now I actually have it on auto targeting and am generating a consistent stream of paperback sales...with my CPC down to $0.30...

    My second novel was hurt by being launched at the time of Createspace to KDP move....It is slowly finding its legs.

    My latest novel is still early.

    I plan to go the box set root for a Christmas offering of the three combined. 

    It is a grind but, you have to keep expectations down. So while not profitable yet, it is moving in that direct. It took me 24 months, but am closing in on 50 Amazon reviews and 100 in Goodreads.

    BTW. Don't underestimate Goodreads. Someone who reads your books and gives it a 4 or 5 may have 50 friends or more who see that!!!

    Also, since I am in the Young Adult category/Literary fiction, the markets are smaller compared to the others.

    This also is a passion hobby for me right now.

    Mark

    Online Vidya

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    Re: The crux of the indie publishing problem, 2020 version: profitability
    « Reply #11 on: July 30, 2020, 11:35:28 am »
    Quote
    I've looked up past authors who sold well and now sell nothing, even books with hundreds of ratings.

    I myself don't know the names of any such authors but Ive been hearing this for a couple of years now. People have said they knew authors who did extremely well years ago when it was far less competitive and who are not publishing any more because their books just stopped selling. No one mentions any names, though, so I cant say who they are.

    Offline Patrick1980

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    Re: The crux of the indie publishing problem, 2020 version: profitability
    « Reply #12 on: July 30, 2020, 11:53:36 am »
    I myself don't know the names of any such authors but Ive been hearing this for a couple of years now. People have said they knew authors who did extremely well years ago when it was far less competitive and who are not publishing any more because their books just stopped selling. No one mentions any names, though, so I cant say who they are.


    Amanda Hocking, JA Konrath, and John Locke---the superstars of 2010---don't seem to be selling like they once did. I've also noticed that Hugh Howey hasn't put out anything new in a while. (There's a new edition of 'Wool' but that's an old book.)

    Those are the heavy hitters, who got write-ups in the mainstream press back in the day. There are probably more just below them.

    In fairness, though, that may be because they told all the stories they wanted to tell, burned out, or just moved on to other things. (That happens, too.)
    « Last Edit: July 30, 2020, 11:55:16 am by Patrick1980 »

    Offline Sheri LHP

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    Re: The crux of the indie publishing problem, 2020 version: profitability
    « Reply #13 on: July 30, 2020, 12:07:52 pm »
    In romance, reader groups and digitally shaking hands with readers are invaluable. Readers love being able to access an author and being "in" on the process.

    I did an experiment with one of my authors with two older books that were only selling 15 a month or so. She ran Facebook ads on one, with a $10 a day limit, I think? And I reread the book so I could honestly say I had just read it and hit the groups sharing it and recommending it with a link wherever it would be appropriate (no bombing or blanketing--genuine recommendations).

    Her ads did nothing, while an hour of my time, with a couple of her other superfans backing me up by chiming in, increased sales per day from $15 to $75, and the book ranked again on whatever obscure niche it was in and stayed up for a few days. Loyal readers who recommend books to each other are invaluable. And readers LOVE to feel like they are behind the scenes.

    I don't know if other genres also have reader groups who are fans of the books, but if so, it would be worthwhile to experiment in making yourself available. Figure out what your time is worth per hour and invest in networking and keep track of the time to see if it makes a difference.
    You can never get a cup of tea large enough or a book long enough to suit me." C.S. Lewis

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    Offline Lorri Moulton [Lavender Lass Books]

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    Re: The crux of the indie publishing problem, 2020 version: profitability
    « Reply #14 on: July 30, 2020, 12:11:22 pm »
    In romance, reader groups and digitally shaking hands with readers are invaluable. Readers love being able to access an author and being "in" on the process.

    I did an experiment with one of my authors with two older books that were only selling 15 a month or so. She ran Facebook ads on one, with a $10 a day limit, I think? And I reread the book so I could honestly say I had just read it and hit the groups sharing it and recommending it with a link wherever it would be appropriate (no bombing or blanketing--genuine recommendations).

    Her ads did nothing, while an hour of my time, with a couple of her other superfans backing me up by chiming in, increased sales per day from $15 to $75, and the book ranked again on whatever obscure niche it was in and stayed up for a few days. Loyal readers who recommend books to each other are invaluable. And readers LOVE to feel like they are behind the scenes.

    I don't know if other genres also have reader groups who are fans of the books, but if so, it would be worthwhile to experiment in making yourself available. Figure out what your time is worth per hour and invest in networking and keep track of the time to see if it makes a difference.

    If you develop a rapport with readers...even if they don't read your particular genre, they may recommend your book to a friend.

    Author of Romance, Fantasy, Mystery, Suspense and Historical Non-Fiction.
    Lavender Lass Books | Website | Amazon | Facebook | Twitter |YouTube | Pinterest | Instagram

    Offline rickchesler

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    Re: The crux of the indie publishing problem, 2020 version: profitability
    « Reply #15 on: July 30, 2020, 12:45:40 pm »
    I've been publishing (mostly thrillers and action-adventure) since 2010 and have never spent money on advertising, with the exception of BB featured deals, which have always been profitable for me. I do know what you mean, I see these books with consistently high rankings even though they have been out for years and know it is through ads, but then I also know those ads in many cases are eating up the profits. I've sold north of 150,000 units and counting altogether with almost zero ads. I do pay for my author website, and I do spend time maintaining a social media presence and interacting with readers there. I also maintain a beta reader group of about 30 loyal readers, an opt-in newsletter and things like that, but I don't pay for Fb ads or AMS ads or BB regular ads, only the BB Featured Deals when they are offered to me, nor have I ever paid for reviews. I have used a combo of trad pubs, small press and self-pub during that time, and they all have their pros & cons. I've also had hits (Amazon category #1's, Top 100 in paid Kindle store, foreign rights deals, strong audio sales, etc.) with both standalones and series, as well as flops with standalones and series. Regularly putting out more books in and of itself is a big momentum builder, too, but I guess regardless of how often they're released you can either advertize them or not. So I definitely don't know the answer, but I do know that organic sales do still happen, and the actual quality of the story, its presentation with cover and description, and if it is in a popular genre seem to be more important than using pricey advertising to gain artificial visibility. That said, I can see just with BB that learning the ins & outs of any advertising platform is not trivial and can make a difference in an individual's success or failure with that system. I'm definitely much better at using BB than I was when I started with it, for example, and I suspect the same is probably true of AMS and Fb, but still, you have to put your time and resources into where it feels like it will have the biggest cost/benefit ratio for you. For you, not for somebody else.
    « Last Edit: July 30, 2020, 02:58:10 pm by rickchesler »

    Online Shane Lochlann Black

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    Re: The crux of the indie publishing problem, 2020 version: profitability
    « Reply #16 on: July 30, 2020, 02:13:20 pm »
    It would appear that rapid release and mailing list are two of the key mechanisms to sustainable sales.  I came to the same conclusion. The mailing list is valuable because it costs nothing to promote your books to your subscribers. Rapid release is valuable because frequent new books give you something to tell your subscribers about. The two strategies are complementary. 

    Offline Crystal_

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    Re: The crux of the indie publishing problem, 2020 version: profitability
    « Reply #17 on: July 30, 2020, 03:26:47 pm »
    Shaking hands with readers, digitally or not, doesn't scale.

    Facebook and AMS ads do.

    No and low cost marketing is great, but it's often very time intensive. If you find effective, low cost marketing that isn't time intensive, go and scale the eff out of it. But be clear when you describe the fruits of this marketing. One person's effective marketing is an extra $25. Another's is an extra 25k.

    I won't spend a lot of time on marketing unless it's going to earn me an extra four figures over the coming months/years. When I started, I'd hustle like hell for a hundred bucks, but now I'm not really interested in a new marketing strategy unless I can scale it to a point where I'm making four figures.

    I sacrifice profitability for time. I would rather my FB and AMS ads run a little worse than spend more time on them.

    I aim to spend less than 50% of my revenue on marketing. (I have other expenses, but they're tiny compared to FB and AMS). I sometimes do much better, I sometimes do a little worse, but that is my goal.

    I spend six figures a year on ads and I make six figures in profit.

    I didn't start out spending this much, and I don't recommend others spend this much to start. Start at zero and go from there.

    ... but spending a lot isn't a bad thing in and of itself. It's just a thing. Plenty of authors who spend a lot also make a lot.

    (And plenty just spend a lot. It's hard running aggressive advertising campaigns profitably).

    Online Patty Jansen

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    Re: The crux of the indie publishing problem, 2020 version: profitability
    « Reply #18 on: July 30, 2020, 03:58:57 pm »
    You know, I think this "It used to be so much easier in 2012" is garbage. The trickery, buzzwords and other short-term BS has changed, but the fundamentals have not. The same methods that worked then work now: write a book that people want to read. Make sure your tribe doesn't wander off and forget about you, or gets lost in the Amazonian woods (i.e. OWN your audience). Rinse and repeat.

    I even commit the "crime" of writing across multiple genres. And commit the "crime"of "only" writing three books this year. No, you don't need to kill yourself with your production schedule. You just need to write books enough people want to read to give you a basic income.

    You advertise at low levels to keep new blood coming into your tribe where people fall off. My tribe is like a big department store. I'd like to keep them there as long as possible, but eventually some will leave. You need to keep the doors open. That's what advertising is for.

    I have a bunch of ads going at all times. They're low-spend, zero-maintenance. I have a Facebook ad that's been going continuously since November 2017. All my ads are CPC at ultra-low bids, so that if clicks do happen to explode suddenly (as they did in early April), I know they're going to be worth it. There are many days I forget to check on my ads.

    Online Shane Lochlann Black

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    Re: The crux of the indie publishing problem, 2020 version: profitability
    « Reply #19 on: July 30, 2020, 04:06:50 pm »
    A good CPC campaign will return 2x pretty reliably, provided your prices are right and your creatives/targeting are optimized.  That multiple can increase for brief periods. If you have sufficient volume, you can roll your earnings over into larger ad spends and build to a point where sales are throwing off enough to cover both marketing and bills. 

    Eventually you'll reach a point where you are like a pro card player. You don't even look at the cards any more, you just play your opponent. It's the same with digital marketing. Once you find a market, it doesn't matter what book it is, the principles are the same. This is one among many reasons big entertainment looks at the product the way any manufacturer does: it's a widget with a price and a margin. You plug in the numbers and run it through the big advertising cheese grater and see what falls out.   

    Quote
    I even commit the "crime" of writing across multiple genres.
       

    Patty speaks wisdom.  I made the same mistake and now I know exactly why all the books I wrote except the sci-fi titles failed. Database say I make red widgets. If I upload a green widget this happens: 

    <a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rge17TciHfU" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rge17TciHfU</a>

    Further proof that human beings cannot be modeled or described mathematically. 

    « Last Edit: July 30, 2020, 04:09:30 pm by Shane Lochlann Black »

    Offline rickchesler

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    Re: The crux of the indie publishing problem, 2020 version: profitability
    « Reply #20 on: July 30, 2020, 04:17:51 pm »
    Shaking hands with readers, digitally or not, doesn't scale. Facebook and AMS ads do.

    If a writer had to pick one ad platform to concentrate on at first as a step towrd, ads, which do you think is better--Fb or AMS? I would think AMS, since it's tied directly in with Amazon, but what was your experience?


    Online Patty Jansen

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    Re: The crux of the indie publishing problem, 2020 version: profitability
    « Reply #21 on: July 30, 2020, 07:13:56 pm »

    Shaking hands with readers, digitally or not, doesn't scale. Facebook and AMS ads do.

    If a writer had to pick one ad platform to concentrate on at first as a step towrd, ads, which do you think is better--Fb or AMS? I would think AMS, since it's tied directly in with Amazon, but what was your experience?



    Our experience matters squat. You can get either to work. Whether it *will* work for you depends on you: your genre, your books, sellthrough and how much work, money and smarts you're going to put into tailoring campaigns that work for you and you only. No one can tell you go AMS or go Facebook or Bookbub especially without knowing *any* of someone else's situation, their budget, their books or their reasons for advertising. Ads for giving away freebies will look different from ads selling full-price box sets, and ads for books in KU will be very different from ads for wide books, or print books or audio books. An ad for a 99c loss leader will look different from an ad for a new release. And so forth.

    Offline rickchesler

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    Re: The crux of the indie publishing problem, 2020 version: profitability
    « Reply #22 on: July 30, 2020, 07:26:11 pm »
    Our experience matters squat. You can get either to work. Whether it *will* work for you depends on you: your genre, your books, sellthrough and how much work, money and smarts you're going to put into tailoring campaigns that work for you and you only. No one can tell you go AMS or go Facebook or Bookbub especially without knowing *any* of someone else's situation, their budget, their books or their reasons for advertising. Ads for giving away freebies will look different from ads selling full-price box sets, and ads for books in KU will be very different from ads for wide books, or print books or audio books. An ad for a 99c loss leader will look different from an ad for a new release. And so forth.

    I was specifically asking the OP of that quote, although other opinions are welcome if they feel like providing those kinds of details.

    Online Patty Jansen

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    Re: The crux of the indie publishing problem, 2020 version: profitability
    « Reply #23 on: July 30, 2020, 07:31:15 pm »
    I was specifically asking the OP of that quote, although other opinions are welcome if they feel like providing those kinds of details.

    Provide details about a situation where no details are provided?

    But I get the hint, I'll  p*ss  off.

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    Re: The crux of the indie publishing problem, 2020 version: profitability
    « Reply #24 on: July 30, 2020, 08:55:46 pm »
    I spend what I consider a decent amount on ads every month. It usually fluctuates between 3500-15000 every month. So far, every month has been solid and an increase over last year. That's a win in my book. Some months are better than others and COVID has certainly had an impact on me.

    I live what I consider a very comfortable lifestyle now ever since I went full time. I've paid for renovation projects, paid off debt and more. There's always more to do, though. Onwards and upwards.

    I think advertising is a key component. For example, I wouldn't have gotten where I am now without Amazon ads. (I'm only starting FB ads now.) We're in a pay to play society now. Start small and work your way up. That's exactly what I did. And for the record, I'm only just starting my mailing list now. It can be done.

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