Poll

Which book would you like to read & discuss in November?

"Doc" - Mary Doria Russell
5 (50%)
"Sarah's Key" - Tatiana de Rosnay
1 (10%)
"Those Who Save Us" - Jenna Blum
4 (40%)

Total Members Voted: 10

Voting closed: October 09, 2011, 07:54:27 am

Author Topic: November Book-of-the-Month - book has been chosen!  (Read 2305 times)  

Offline KindleGirl

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November Book-of-the-Month - book has been chosen!
« on: September 25, 2011, 07:54:27 am »
Imallbs has chosen 3 awesome books from the historical fiction genre for you to vote on. Please see the descriptions below, maybe sample the choices and come back here to vote! Voting will be open for 2 weeks.



Amazon.com Review
A Letter from Author Mary Doria Russell
For the past three years, when people asked what my next novel is about, I've only had to say four words. It's about Doc Holliday. You mention Doc Holliday to guys especially and they just light up. Oh, man! I love Doc! they say, and they often mention Val Kilmer's portrayal in the movie Tombstone.
I love that movie, too, but when I write characters, I'm really writing about whom and what they love. The shining silver wire that runs through Doc is John Henry Holliday's love for his mother.

Alice Holliday was 22 when her son was born near Atlanta in the summer of 1851. She was still in mourning for her firstborn, a sweet little girl who lived just long enough to gaze and smile and laugh, and break her parents' hearts. I'm sure you can imagine her distress when her second child was born with a cleft palate and cleft lip. Even today, when you know clefts can be repaired, they're a shock.

In 1851, such children commonly died within weeks, but Alice kept her boy alive, waking every hour to feed him with an eyedropper, day and night, for eight long weeks. Think about that exhausted young woman and the baby with the hole in his face. Locking eyes. Struggling to stay awake. Struggling to stay alive...

When the infant was two months old, his uncle Dr. John Stiles Holliday performed a successful surgical repair of the cleft--an achievement kept private to protect the family's reputation. You see, in the 1850s, the Hollidays were Georgia gentry whose large extended family would become the O'Haras, Wilkeses and Hamiltons in Gone With The Wind. (Margaret Mitchell was Doc's cousin, twice removed.) These were people who took good breeding seriously, and birth defects were a source of familial shame--for everyone but Alice.

Alice and her son became intensely close. She invented a form of speech therapy to correct his diction. She was a piano teacher who introduced him to the music that would become their great shared passion. She home-schooled him until she was sure his speech wouldn't be ridiculed, then sent him to a local boys academy, where he excelled in every subject. In the midst of our nation's ugliest war, she raised a shy, intelligent child to be a thoughtful, courteous gentleman and a fine young scholar who would earn the degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery before he was 21.

Alice didn't live to see him graduate. She died of tuberculosis when John Henry was 15. The loss was staggering, and when he, too, developed TB, he knew exactly what kind of awful death he faced. Hoping dry air and sunshine would restore his health, he left everyone and everything he loved, and went West. He was only 22 when he left Atlanta in 1873.

The Doc Holliday of legend is a gambler and gunman who appears out of nowhere in 1881, arriving in Tombstone with a bad reputation and a hooker named Big Nose Kate. But I have written the story of Alice Holliday's son: a scared, sick, lonely boy, born for the life of a minor aristocrat in a world that ceased to exist at the end of the Civil War, trying to stay alive on the rawest edge of the American frontier.

John Henry Holliday didn't have a mother to love him when he was grown, so I have taken him for my own. My fondest hope for Doc is that it will win for him the compassion and respect I think he deserves. Read it, and weep.



From Publishers Weekly
Starred Review. In the summer of 1942, the French police arrested thousands of Jewish families and held them outside of Paris before shipping them off to Auschwitz. On the 60th anniversary of the roundups, an expatriate American journalist covering the atrocities discovers a personal connectionher apartment was formerly occupied by one such family. She resolves to find out what happened to Sarah, the 10-year-old daughter, who was the only family member to survive. The story is heart-wrenching, and Polly Stone gives an excellent performance, keeping a low-key tone through descriptions of horror that would elicit excessive dramatics from a less talented performer. Her characters are easy to differentiate, and her French accent is convincing. De Rosnay's novel is captivating, and the powerful narration gives it even greater impact. A St. Martin's hardcover. (June)
Copyright Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.



From Publishers Weekly
Blum, who worked for Steven Spielberg's Shoah Foundation, takes a direct, unsentimental look at the Holocaust in her first novel. The narrative alternates between the present-day story of Trudy, a history professor at a Minneapolis university collecting oral histories of WWII survivors (both German and Jewish), and that of her aged but once beautiful German mother, Anna, who left her country when she married an American soldier. Interspersed with Trudy's interviews with German immigrants, many of whom reveal unabashed anti-Semitism, Anna's story flashes back to her hometown of Weimar. As Nazi anti-Jewish edicts intensify in the 1930s, Anna hides her love affair with a Jewish doctor, Max Stern. When Max is interned at nearby Buchenwald and Anna's father dies, Anna, carrying Max's child, goes to live with a baker who smuggles bread to prisoners at the camp. Anna assists with the smuggling after Trudy's birth until the baker is caught and executed. Then Anna catches the eye of the Obersturmfhrer, a high-ranking Nazi officer at Buchenwald, who suspects her of also supplying the inmates with bread. He coerces her into a torrid, abusive affair, in which she remains complicit to ensure her survival and that of her baby daughter. Blum paints a subtle, nuanced portrait of the Obersturmfhrer, complicating his sordid cruelty with more delicate facets of his personality. Ultimately, present and past overlap with a shocking yet believable coincidence. Blum's spare imagery is nightmarish and intimate, imbuing familiar panoramas of Nazi atrocity with stark new power. This is a poised, hair-raising debut.
Copyright Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved
« Last Edit: October 09, 2011, 12:34:32 pm by KindleGirl »

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    Offline LauraB

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    Re: November Book-of-the-Month - NEED YOUR VOTES!
    « Reply #1 on: October 01, 2011, 09:41:25 am »
    I almost voted for Sarah's Key , I read it a few months ago and really liked it. But I voted for one I haven't read yet. Sarah's Key was really good though.
    Books read in 2010: 43 2011: 42 + the Bible 2012: 60; books read 2013:56*

    Offline KindleGirl

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    Re: November Book-of-the-Month - NEED YOUR VOTES by October 9!!
    « Reply #2 on: October 07, 2011, 05:22:46 am »
    Votes are tied on 2 of the books. Sample the books and come back to vote so we can declare a winner on Sunday!!

    Offline KindleGirl

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    Re: November Book-of-the-Month - NEED YOUR VOTES by October 9!!
    « Reply #3 on: October 09, 2011, 12:33:23 pm »
    Ok, the winner has been chosen....."Doc" will be the book for November! I know this book is available at my libraries, so it's worth a check if you do not want to purchase it.

    Come back here in November to join in discussions!

    Offline 1131

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    Re: November Book-of-the-Month - book has been chosen!
    « Reply #4 on: October 11, 2011, 05:55:33 pm »
    I enjoyed this book.  I got it from the library so I'll have to go put myself on the wait list again.

    Offline 1131

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    Re: November Book-of-the-Month - book has been chosen!
    « Reply #5 on: November 03, 2011, 07:16:20 am »
    It is time for the November Book of the Month Klub.  Doc is a good book to read and discuss.  We'll get started on Saturday if that's OK.  Feel free to post comments, questions, thoughts and whatever else strikes you starting now.

    Offline splash883

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    Re: November Book-of-the-Month - book has been chosen!
    « Reply #6 on: November 03, 2011, 02:51:46 pm »
     ???
    I added a comment, but it was it's own topic.  It got moved.  Am I not supposed to start a new topic--only those leading each month?  I'm new to the BoTm Klub, so I'm not familiar w/the rules.
    I'm excited to start the discussion!
    Blessings,
    Kelsey

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