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Messages - churlishfellow

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51
Reviews for Sir Nathan and the Quest for Queen Gobbledeegook are starting to come in!  I couldn't be more pleased with readers' reactions!  Learn more about the book and read the reviews, plus a preview of the book, on the website!  Once there, you can find a link to download an e-book for your Kindle and find the book in other formats as well!

The book is starting to appear in local bookstores and is also getting used in 5 classrooms to encourage children to read, including a few TAG programs.

http://somewhatsillystory.com

thanks!

52
Please visit my book's new website!  There you can follow along on my blog, Facebook and Twitter and find links to get your own copy of the book!  You can also read a preview of the book right on the website!

Also, the follow-up book, Sir Nathan and the Task of Terribleness, will be out this spring yet!  Look for teasers coming soon!

http://somewhatsillystory.com/

53
Thanks for the Gerald Morris recommendations.  I have to say, looking through a sample of your "Black Magic Academy", that looks interesting too.  The style with which you write is the sort of thing I strive to and we seem to have the same sort of flow and pacing ... brief pauses during dialogue to add in character reactions and thoughts and short, bright, colorful descriptions of actions.  I'll add it to my "to read" list.

Thanks!

54
The Book Bazaar / Re: Post one sentence that describes your book
« on: March 07, 2012, 11:33:09 am »
Sir Nathan and the Quest for Queen Gobbledeegook - A silly fairy tale in a somewhat ridiculous land for the young and young-at-heart.

55
The Book Bazaar / Re: Sir Nathan and the Quest for Queen Gobbledeegook
« on: March 07, 2012, 11:28:02 am »
An excerpt from Part V of Sir Nathan and the Quest for Queen Gobbledeegook.

- - - - - - - -

The sun shone out of a dazzling, blue sky and warmed the forest floor. The weather was changing, getting cooler in preparation for winter. The leaves of the Hootentoot Trees were shifting colors with the change in seasons, going from green to white with pink polka- dots. Nothing looked more stunning than an entire forest of Hootentoot Trees in the fall.
Every puff of wind caused more and more of the changed leaves to drop gently from the trees, where they would swirl and waft and scream all the way to the ground, for nothing has a greater fear of falling than the leaves of a Hootentoot Tree. If you were going to go for a walk through a Hootentoot Forest during the fall on a particularly windy day, you'd be smart to bring some ear plugs.

The forest floor was covered in a colorful carpet of leaves. Chattering Hobnobber Squirrels hopped and scurried about. The dry, autumn leaves crackled and crunched underfoot and the noise caused by the busy squirrels was almost as loud as all the screams of the terrified, falling foliage.

The Hobnobber Squirrels were busy looking for Huckle Nuts from the few Huckle Nut Trees scattered amongst the Hootentoots to store for the long winter months ahead. Fortunately for them, they weren't finding very many, for nothing is more poisonous to a Hobnobber Squirrel than a few tastes of Huckle Nut. In the dazzling sunshine, the fuzzy, blue squirrels stood out brightly against the background of the forest floor covered in pink polka-dot leaves. There were even a few late-season Grumble Bees buzzing here and there, muttering about how cold it was already getting at night even though summer had just ended.

It was a wonderful, crisp autumn day to be out in the woods. It was a day where the chill in the air was countered by the toasty warmth of the sunshine. And the Hobnobber Squirrels chattered happily as they searched for nuts, all of them just as delighted with the day as they could be.

Except for one.

This one particular squirrel just sat on a stump. If you listened closely, and you could find a quiet moment amongst all of the wailing leaves, you just might have been able to hear an occasional naughty word or two come from the squirrel's tiny mouth.

56
The Book Corner / Re: SMASHWORDS - anybody buy their books, there?
« on: February 29, 2012, 02:09:12 pm »
I gotta agree that, as both a buyer and a self-publisher, Smashwords can sometimes be spotty.  There are times when the site is just unavailable.  But, I do find it to be easy to navigate through and I can quickly grab some cheap or free reads to check out other self-published works.

57
The Book Corner / Re: How to find GOOD SciFi e-books
« on: February 29, 2012, 02:02:10 pm »
My thanks as well to all the good replies on this thread.  I've been dealing with the same dilemma.  Aside from wading through poorly written books, there's also the challenge of finding a unique story idea.  My 9 year old son will tell me all about a book that he claims to be the best thing since sliced bread where, in my mind, I'm thinking of all the books that had done the exact same thing, years and years before.  But, to him, it's an amazing work because he hasn't gone through that particular story thread before. 

I will be visiting the suggested links others have posted.

58
The Book Bazaar / Re: Sir Nathan and the Quest for Queen Gobbledeegook
« on: February 29, 2012, 07:45:58 am »
I was tickled to find out that a local 4th grade class was reading Sir Nathan and the Quest for Queen Gobbledeegook!  They invited me to visit and to read to them from the book.  I had a great time!  The kids were wonderful and it tickled my fancy so much to see how many of them were interested in the book and wanting to know what happened next.  Read some of the letters they wrote and see the pictures they drew for me from the story at the book's Facebook page: http://ow.ly/9myEf

Now, I've been invited to come share the book with a 5th grade class in a different school.  It thrills me to no end to see people entertained by my work.

The story is a silly fairy-tale, about a knight out to rescue his missing Queen.  It's got pixies and warlocks and talking horses and blue squirrels.  You can't go wrong with a blue squirrel, right?  Funnily enough, there was a news story about a blue squirrel not too long ago.

Sir Nathan and the Quest for Queen Gobbledeegook is available through Amazon.com as a download for the Kindle, but you can find it for the Kindle at a special price of $.99 at it's Smashwords site here: http://www.smashwords.com/books/view/128683

59
The Book Bazaar / Re: Sir Nathan and the Quest for Queen Gobbledeegook
« on: February 22, 2012, 05:25:05 am »
Thanks and enjoy!  I'd love to hear what they think!

60
The Book Bazaar / Re: Sir Nathan and the Quest for Queen Gobbledeegook
« on: February 22, 2012, 04:58:16 am »
Sir Nathan and the Quest for Queen Gobbledeegook is a silly fairy tale, written for ages 7 through 12, and for those young at heart.  For the rest of February, 2012, you can get a FREE version for the Kindle (and other e-readers) off the Smashwords site!  Just use the coupon code "BB58K" when checking out.

http://www.smashwords.com/books/view/128683

Queen Gobbledeegook has gone missing and it is up to Sir Nathan, the Hero of Mariskatania, to find her. Along the way he meets all sorts of odd folks, including pixies and wizards and a hulking creature named Mitzy that likes to knit. The land of Mariskatania is a colorful one, filled with bright Jubb Jubb Trees and fuzzy, blue Hobnobber Squirrels who spend all their time looking for a snack guaranteed to poison them.

I originally wrote this fairy-tale merely to give to my young nieces and nephews many years ago.  Now that I have a 9 year old son of my own, I rewrote and re-edited the story and have (not so) bravely ventured into the world of self-publication.  My intention was to write a book than not only appealed to that 7-12 year old "tween" group of readers, but also to the parents and older kids that read alongside them. 


61
Writers' Cafe / Re: Authors Please NOMINATE your books for BOOK OF THE DAY
« on: February 21, 2012, 03:27:53 pm »
Thanks for the opportunity!



Book Description Sir Nathan and the Quest for Queen Gobbledeegook is a silly fairy tale, written for ages 7 through 12, and for those young at heart.

Queen Gobbledeegook has gone missing and it is up to Sir Nathan, the Hero of Mariskatania, to find her. Along the way he meets all sorts of odd folks, including pixies and wizards and a hulking creature named Mitzy that likes to knit. The land of Mariskatania is a colorful one, filled with bright Jubb Jubb Trees and fuzzy, blue Hobnobber Squirrels who spend all their time looking for Huckle Nuts.

Bio Mark Smith lives in a small town in the Midwest and has enjoyed the creative outlet of writing since a young age. Sir Nathan and the Quest for Queen Gobbledeegook was originally written as a silly romp through a land of adventure for the author's young nieces and nephews. Now it has been rewritten and edited for a general release, aimed at other children like the author's 9 year old son and for those young at heart.

62
Writers' Cafe / Re: Compass eBooks facebook - post your books!
« on: February 21, 2012, 03:23:15 pm »
Thanks for the opportunity!  Liked and posted! 

63
The Book Corner / Re: Best book to read after The Hunger Games?
« on: February 19, 2012, 03:39:13 pm »
Put me down for another vote for the Piers Anthony Apprentice Adept series.  Luckily for me, a quick google of the series shows there's a total of 7 books.  I only read the first 3 and didn't notice the other 4 came out.  Put it on my "to read" list.

64
The Book Corner / Re: Your Earliest Memories of Buying Books?
« on: February 19, 2012, 03:34:25 pm »
So hilarious to me that the initial post mentions a Star Trek book.  I remember my first "need" to have a bookshelf of some kind in my room and it was for my whopping library of two (2) books.  One was Splinter In A Mind's Eye and the other a Star Trek book.



These first two books were gifts, but my first remembered purchases were in high school.  I specifically remember gobbling up the Piers Anthony Xanth series.  There might have been others that were first, but that's my first remembered book.

65
The Book Corner / Re: Does anyone read the dedication?
« on: February 19, 2012, 03:30:15 pm »
It's often difficult to read the dedications because it might be talking about stuff you're not familiar with in regards to people you've never heard of.  What's touching for an author and the people he/she is thanking, is (to me) kind of like hearing about a fatal car accident on the news involving ... you're just not as affected because it's events beyond your personal horizons. 

BUT ... I think they're important.

66
The Book Corner / Books That Everyone Loves That You Just Can't Enjoy
« on: February 18, 2012, 06:18:08 pm »
I see a lot of threads on here about book recommendations, but what about the books that everyone tells you are a MUST read that you just can't get through?

In high school English, I gobbled up most everything we were given to read.  Got good reads.  Even got scolded the day after we were given a new book (Elie Wiesel's Night) because I had taken it home and finished it after the first day and therefore didn't have anything to do the next day in class when we were given in-class time to read the book.  But then we hit Pride and Prejudice.  My mind would never get through more than a paragraph.  I bombed horribly on all the tests.  I held out hopes that watching an old black and white video of the movie in class right before the final exam on the book would help me out.  Nope.  Big, fat F.  I begged and pleaded with the teacher for some leniency, as I obviously wasn't a poor student, but that I just couldn't get through the book.  Nope.  F.

To this day I haven't been able to get through the book, though it's on my bucket list.  

Others that I don't quite see the big draw in are the Phillip K. Dick stuff and things like Catch 22 and Fahrenheit 451.  I WANT to read those books and I WANT to enjoy them, but ... maybe I'm just too simple minded.  I need things spelled out for me.  Maybe that's why I'm sticking to writing children's stories ... that way I can understand what I'm writing about.

Or, with the show coming out, what about book 3 of The Hunger Games.  Loved and gobbled up 1 and 2 and then fizzled out very quickly on 3.  It was if it was a completely different author.  

67
The Book Corner / Re: That book you couldn't put down: Sci-fi edition
« on: February 18, 2012, 06:10:09 pm »
Kind of surprised to not see John Varley mentioned here (that I noticed).  From his writing, it's clear that he's a Heinlein fan, so anyone liking R.A.H. ought to give Varley a try.  Books of his that I decree a MUST are his 3 book Titan series and then a stand-alone, Steel Beach.  I've given those books to so many people ...

He's got some odd stuff too that seriously made me wonder whether or not it's the same author.  But try these I mentioned.  I've read and reread them lots and lots.

68
The Book Corner / Re: Anyone Read Actual Books Anymore?
« on: February 18, 2012, 05:55:24 pm »
I really like the the e-book convenience - just finished reading to my son before bedtime on a digital device.  You get the built-in bookmarks, built in dictionary ... it's just nice and convenient.

But there's something about the physical book that I love.  I guess they're kind of trophies for me.  Actually just finished our basement this past summer with all sorts of built-in bookshelves for all my babies that have been sitting in boxes for the past 6 years since we moved into this house.  I get a very visceral reaction and memory looking at my books.  Just seeing the cover can bring back the memory of what I liked about the book (or hated).  Plus, what a great to talk about books with friends ... you can pull them down off the shelves and discuss.

So, if there's an e-book that I'm really enjoying, I may read it all digitally, but I usually end up getting a paper copy for the shelf. 

69
Introductions & Welcomes / Hello and greetings from Belleville, Wisconsin
« on: February 16, 2012, 05:22:37 am »
Brand new to Kindle Boards, the site was recommended to me by the Smashwords marketing guide.  I've already been digging through postings looking for new stuff to read (there's never enough!) and making my to-read lists.

I'm an author of silly adventure fairy tales for that 'tween age of around 8-12 years and hoping to make something sustainable from that while gobbling up the work of others!

Nice to be here!
Mark

70
Writers' Cafe / Re: First time author
« on: February 15, 2012, 03:05:04 pm »
I just delved into the world of self-publication a few weeks ago and so far I've found smashwords.com to be the most helpful website.  The site has a very helpful publishing guide, is free to sign up at and is an easy way to share a book, even if you don't intend to charge anything for it.  If you're looking to start selling a book, it's a great place to start as well.  From there I moved on to self-publication on Amazon.com, which didn't have as much reassuring advice as you went along, but still wasn't that difficult.  

If you're looking to have print-on-demand books available to sell, try out createspace.com.  I'm still in the middle of setting my book up there - it takes quite a bit more work, as you need to delve into typesetting a lot more than you need to with an e-book.  

There are other sites as well that allow for self-publication, especially of e-books, such as PubIt! and LuLu.


hope this helps,
Mark



 

71
Sir Nathan and the Quest for Queen Gobbledeegook is a silly fairy tale, written for ages 7 through 12, and for those young at heart.

Queen Gobbledeegook has gone missing and it is up to Sir Nathan, the Hero of Mariskatania, to find her. Along the way he meets all sorts of odd folks, including pixies and wizards and a hulking creature named Mitzy that likes to knit. The land of Mariskatania is a colorful one, filled with bright Jubb Jubb Trees and fuzzy, blue Hobnobber Squirrels who spend all their time looking for a snack guaranteed to poison them.

I originally wrote this fairy-tale merely to give to my young nieces and nephews many years ago.  Now that I have a 9 year old son of my own, I rewrote and re-edited the story and have (not so) bravely ventured into the world of self-publication.  My intention was to write a book than not only appealed to that 8-12 year old "tween" group of readers, but also to the parents and older kids that read alongside them.  

http://www.amazon.com/Nathan-Quest-Queen-Gobbledeegook-ebook/dp/B0074NQ6ZO/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1329336941&sr=8-1

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