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Would you use AI to write your book?

  • Yes

    Votes: 9 47.4%
  • No

    Votes: 10 52.6%
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just got early-bird access to the most powerful AI on the planet.

No joke.

It's called "GPT-3" and everyone can apply for access.

But it's SCARY good! That's why I don't like it.
For us authors it is really useful to generate ideas, and headlines and hooks for our book's description on -zon.

It can even write DIALOGUE!
The damned thing (the AI I mean) was fed the entire data set of Wikipedia!
And if that wasn't enough they fed it about 5 terabytes of "the internet" too.

I made a video about it here:
If you want to see my examples and stuff.

But that's not the point.
The point is we gotta get ready for this stuff!

Authors who have access to this could easily (or more easily) do "Rapid Release" and just blow everyone else in the dust!

Granted; right now a conversation generated by the AI becomes circular at one point.
However, that doesn't stop a savvy author from using it to generate new ideas and "fortify" his/her story.

It can also answer questions...so ask it something like "What's the circumference of the sun" and it will spit out the correct answer.

Really cool:
You can tell it to write a JOB INTERVIEW...or a book report!
And even cooler, you can tell it to write "at a 3rd grade level"...and it will! (conversely you can tell it to write like a scientist, or even have an ACCENT (!) like Victorian English etc.)

OK, 'nuff for now.
Check out the vid and let me know what you think -- oh! And apply for early access!
 

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I could see this being really useful for people doing rapid release, and we will probably see people trying to use this to put out entire books, but how scary is it? My initial reaction is, meh. It still takes a lot of work to put things together, and edit, and make a story.

Personally, I'm kinda old school and don't have much interest in this other than maybe getting into some kind of John Henry-esque writing throw down. Me vs. the AI, microsoft word...yeah, let's go.

Heh, I don't know. It seems like a decent tool for people that want it. I don't see it as too different from writing down a whole bunch of things quickly and using grammer software to fix it. From the examples in the video I think it would take me longer to use this than it would to just write.

The real downside is that it could flood more books out there and make everyone even less visible. Oh and eventually things like this will ruin essays for schools.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Year 2027, AI generated content dominates. But, there will be a niche, and subcategories, out there for "certified human written" fiction.

Then there'll be the controversy and in-fighting as the indies who don't have the money to access the AI will notice there are many AI generated books put out by the content mills and rich indies claiming to be "human written" when it's clear that they weren't, with whole series sprouting up in mere days, and the content mills keep getting richer while everyone else has to pay more and more for visibility until they're priced out and the store consists of a few "masterminds".

Year 2030, the AI will come down in price to the point where nearly everyone can afford it, and it'll get so good you won't be able to tell the difference at all, and just as man-chests have spread to every non-relevant category, the AIs will wind up taking over the "certified human written" subs as well, and writing/storytelling will exit the realm of self-publishing entirely. Then it's an arms race of sorts for number of products and level of visibility. The barrier to entry would be high, and market accessibility would be akin to a retail investor versus giant hedge funds.

Year 2033, writing and storytelling will become like custom cabinet making where a few highly skilled, non-AIers will be able to support themselves creating the whole hardback/paperback product at home, start to finish and made to order for loyal customers, like a bespoke suit. Then common marketplaces run by AI, akin to something like Etsy, will spring up where many of these custom storytellers will congregate, and then controversy will arise anew as its found some of the top merchants are in fact using AIs to churn out more supposed bespoke products faster than their competitors to gain dominant market share, and that too will spiral actually custom-made fiction books into invisibility for those actually doing the writing/creating from scratch, etc.

2040s and beyond, human-to-human storytelling will be sent back to its roots where it's done as a social custom of sorts, and without any monetary compensation in exchange.

Uh... just reading this back...

Man, I really need to lay off the coffee.
EXACTLY!

I think maybe (positively) mankind will pivot, and find a way...

For example those subscription sites like localsOnly, or what's that paid email subscription thingy? Substack?

Medium.com is also a paid blog type, but they have no way of discerning between human or AI.

MY BET:
Medium.com is the "Canary in a coal mine" and is going to get hit first and need to find a solution.
I'm sure the readers on medium will -not- go for this AI generated stuff! (of course...if they don't detect then...?)
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I could see this being really useful for people doing rapid release, and we will probably see people trying to use this to put out entire books, but how scary is it? My initial reaction is, meh. It still takes a lot of work to put things together, and edit, and make a story.

Personally, I'm kinda old school and don't have much interest in this other than maybe getting into some kind of John Henry-esque writing throw down. Me vs. the AI, microsoft word...yeah, let's go.

Heh, I don't know. It seems like a decent tool for people that want it. I don't see it as too different from writing down a whole bunch of things quickly and using grammer software to fix it. From the examples in the video I think it would take me longer to use this than it would to just write.

The real downside is that it could flood more books out there and make everyone even less visible. Oh and eventually things like this will ruin essays for schools.
I've seen how the damned thing generates conversations in SECONDS.
I'm tellin' ya, it's only a matter months (not years) before this starts hitting the big -zon.
For example, I could let it generate just a few paragraphs at a time, controlling its direction.
Then I could put together a kinda hybrid "human-guided-AI" thing real quick...
Hmmm....

Nevermind!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I tried one of these things a few weeks ago. It was quite impressive but it didn't help me get past my plotting difficulties. 馃榿
I'm thinking a hybrid approach will be taken at first.
Human guided, paragraph by paragraph.
Then in..well quicker than we like...it'll be fully automated and then the scenario like @Corvid outlined above kicks in :-(
 

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I've seen how the damned thing generates conversations in SECONDS.
I'm tellin' ya, it's only a matter months (not years) before this starts hitting the big -zon.
For example, I could let it generate just a few paragraphs at a time, controlling its direction.
Then I could put together a kinda hybrid "human-guided-AI" thing real quick...
Hmmm....

Nevermind!
Ha, got you. Maybe I'm underestimating the machine. The more I think about this, my real worry in the whole thing would be fatiguing readers. Like, if tons of new books keep coming out and they are all kinda crappy and no one knows whether or not something was written by an actual person, I could see people getting frustrated looking through the kindle store.

I also wonder about the logistics of this. If you publish a book that was mostly AI written, do you have to credit the company? Is there a limit to how much you can use from the program? I don't know anything about it, but I feel like if the program is generating content that you'd have to credit them or license it somehow. I guess I'm just wondering if readers would be able to see what has been written by AI.
 

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Interesting vid. Yes, it's amazIng that the AI could come up with all that dialogue without a ton of prompting. It's like it is writing actual fiction.

As far as AI advancing to the point that it makes a lot of authors' tasks redundant: give it time, it will happen. AI will probably be first used by authors as a fill-in tool at the very least -- something many authors have been doing since typewritten manuscript days, when pulp authors had generic scenes already written in partial manuscript form -- to plug into their novels, and all they would have to do is copy and change a few things here or there.

Once AI gets to the point of performing well enough I can see where it will undoubtedly be used for that function. Eventually, maybe it will be used to generate entire novels.

I can also see the time when AI will be used to replace audio talent, but that's another separate issue.
 

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I must be completely naive. I didn't even realize this was a thing. Why am I not surprised? How widespread a practice do you think it is? Ugh, hard not to be cynical about this business the more you learn about it.
I don't know how common the practice was, but I imagine it was common in some genres -- romance and erotica, and perhaps even westerns -- during the pulp paperback days of the 80's and earlier. I read an article written by a guy who wrote some sci-fi and wrote erotica to make money during a downturn in his sci-fi career, and he had sections pre-written (mainly the love scenes) which he had pinned to a bulletin board in his writing room (or something like that). He would modify them, but a lot of the language was merely copied, and/or altered slightly. He said it helped him increase his output, and make money that way.

I would wager that at least some modern genre authors probably do the same, only the scenes are on a computer instead of pinned to a wall. You just pull up a generic scene that always occurs in that style of novel (fight scene, battle scene, love scene, etc.), and change the names, and a few other aspects. Done right, it probably saves time in the long run. I myself haven't done it yet. I think the generic scenes I use are in my head. It's just easier for me to type it all out. Then again, I'm not as organized as some authors. But I can see how AI would serve that kind of function.
 

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I am indifferent to it, because I have seen other indie writers who genuinely write their own stories get accused by other writers of getting ghostwriters for their story simply because the writers wrote faster. Those type of people who hate on fast writers annoy me, so this would make me laugh just to give them something to be more paranoid about.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Ha, got you. Maybe I'm underestimating the machine. The more I think about this, my real worry in the whole thing would be fatiguing readers. Like, if tons of new books keep coming out and they are all kinda crappy and no one knows whether or not something was written by an actual person, I could see people getting frustrated looking through the kindle store.

I also wonder about the logistics of this. If you publish a book that was mostly AI written, do you have to credit the company? Is there a limit to how much you can use from the program? I don't know anything about it, but I feel like if the program is generating content that you'd have to credit them or license it somehow. I guess I'm just wondering if readers would be able to see what has been written by AI.
During the public-beta phase, you get 300,000 tokens for free.
After that you have to pay for the tokens.
E.g. if you use the Davinci engine (the best one) it's $.06 per token.
Tokens do not equate 1:1 with words though - it's very nebulous to say the least.

As for accreditation: My guess is no.
Like mentioned by @marissa_lopez we don't have to credit the ghost writers of books, so why would we credit the AI?

I'm thinking of letting the AI just write ONE character in my next book and print that big and fat up front on the 1st page "One character was written with AI - can you guess which one?.." etc.

We shall see!
 

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Publishing is a wide game, and there are many ways to get there. The fact is that some popular writers do use ghostwriters, and some indies have worked as ghostwriters. Most authors (indie and trad) probably don't participate in that sort of thing. It's possible that in the future, when AI is perfected further, it may cut into the work of some ghostwriters. Or ghostwriters themselves may use AI. The future is wide open.
 

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Slightly off topic, but did anyone see a little while back the AI written Harry Potter? Someone sent it to me and it was hilarious. The AI took all the words of the first Harry Potter book and created a story out of it. Bizarre things happened. Most of the characters were cannibals for some reason. I didn't read a ton of it, but what I saw was comedy gold.
 
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