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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
All righty. I'm doing the Susan G. Komen 3 Day Walk for the Cure in San Francisco again this year in September. And in a fit of insanity, I'm doing it again in Atlanta in late October.

Yeeeahhh. Point and laugh.

The walking part of training I have down. But I know I'll need to cross train and strength train in order to have the stamina to not break down in Atlanta. So I'm picking the collective brain here... what should I concentrate the most on? Weights? Other cardio training? And how much training is too much?

Diet?

Help...

I'm gonna die...
 

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Hey Thumper, good luck on those three day walks! Great cause to support and you get the added health benefits of working out. Sounds like a win-win to me. My kids are competitive racewalkers (believe it or not, it's an Olympic sport) and I'm a former cross country coach, so I'll give you some ideas to get you started, but if you have any questions, just holler. Are you starting from scratch or do you already walk?

Focus on getting at least one longer walk (15+) in every week, but build up to it gradually. General rule is your weekly mileage should only be 10-20% more than the previous week, but what amount that is depends on where you're starting from and how much time you have to prepare. Moderate length to short walks the other days of the week, with one or two days off from walking. You could run, rather than walk, if you want to get done more quickly. Running uses more lower leg muscles (arch of the foot, calves) and running will employ your upper leg muscles (quads, hamstrings) more - but the cardio benefit will be the same. Bicycling or elliptical will give your walking muscles a rest, but also give you a good cardio benefits.

Core exercises (planks, crunches) will help stabilize your body and make you a more efficient walker. Some upper body weights (low resistance, high reps) will keep your arms from tiring over the distance. 2-3 times a week for these two things is ideal, but time becomes a factor when you start adding additional training and it'll be the walking that should be your priority.

Since I'm guessing you're not going for time, the important thing is to gradually build up your endurance - that way you won't have ginormous blisters on the big day or have muscles that are screaming at you to stop by the second day. Building up and maintaining a distance base will also help prevent injury.

Good shoes = very important. When they lose their cushioning or support, it's time for a new pair.
 

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Thumper, I am so impressed with your willingness to torture yourself for a good cause!

My training regimen would be "Just shoot me now."
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
N. Gemini Sasson said:
Hey Thumper, good luck on those three day walks! Great cause to support and you get the added health benefits of working out. Sounds like a win-win to me. My kids are competitive racewalkers (believe it or not, it's an Olympic sport) and I'm a former cross country coach, so I'll give you some ideas to get you started, but if you have any questions, just holler. Are you starting from scratch or do you already walk?

Focus on getting at least one longer walk (15+) in every week, but build up to it gradually. General rule is your weekly mileage should only be 10-20% more than the previous week, but what amount that is depends on where you're starting from and how much time you have to prepare. Moderate length to short walks the other days of the week, with one or two days off from walking. You could run, rather than walk, if you want to get done more quickly. Running uses more lower leg muscles (arch of the foot, calves) and running will employ your upper leg muscles (quads, hamstrings) more - but the cardio benefit will be the same. Bicycling or elliptical will give your walking muscles a rest, but also give you a good cardio benefits.

Core exercises (planks, crunches) will help stabilize your body and make you a more efficient walker. Some upper body weights (low resistance, high reps) will keep your arms from tiring over the distance. 2-3 times a week for these two things is ideal, but time becomes a factor when you start adding additional training and it'll be the walking that should be your priority.

Since I'm guessing you're not going for time, the important thing is to gradually build up your endurance - that way you won't have ginormous blisters on the big day or have muscles that are screaming at you to stop by the second day. Building up and maintaining a distance base will also help prevent injury.

Good shoes = very important. When they lose their cushioning or support, it's time for a new pair.
Not starting from scratch...I did the walk last year, and right now I could probably do a 3 day 60 mile on flat ground. I need to get some hill training in there to deal with the San Francisco hills, and that's on the schedule.

This week's walking schedule is 3 miles on Tuesday (but I'll probably do 5, as 3 doesn't feel like anything anymore), 5 on Thursday, 11 on Saturday, and 5 on Sunday. I won't hit the week where I do 15 in one day for about a month, I think...I'd have to look ahead, but the SGK training schedule is pretty good. At the end of the schedule I'll have a weekend where I do 18 one day and 15 the next, back off the following week with a 12 and 8, back to 18 and 15...and then comes the Real Walk.

That part (shoes included...blister battling was a problem last year) I've got down. But if I'm going to do two walks, it's the cross training I need. I'm just not sure what I should concentrate on in the gym...more cardio or weights or both.

The gym I belong to has every conceivable piece of equipment available...but it's a brand new gym and getting time with a trainer is problematic since they're so freaking busy. Aside from resistance weights and free weights, and all the usual cardio equipment, there's also a pool, a dedicated area with equipment for circuit training, yoga...

I think what I'm looking for is what to do in order to not need a massive amount of time to recover from the first walk before I do the second. I have about 6 weeks between them, and I know the first two weeks will consist of drooling on myself and wondering why I can barely feel my feet...
 
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