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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just moments ago joined this board to learn more about the Kindle experience. I do not own a Kindle, and I may never own one, since I am a paper type of reader. My third and fourth books have just been uploaded into the system. Since I understand that other authors have had numerous formatting issues when trying to upload a book file into the system, I expect to have to deal with some of these soon. Whatever errors are already in my Kindle versions, I can only only hope at this point that they are of a minor nature.

Since I don't own a Kindle myself, I would like to hear from you readers out there about whatever you may have already discovered in the manner of formatting issues. Some authors have said that the introductions, reviews, covers, excerpts, and other front matter are the main culprits. Are there particular sections of a book that tend to display formatting errors? Are there particular types of books that do so? I know this may be a rather strange way to begin my conversations on this board, but I am a bit reluctant to upload my two older books until I get a better feel for how the system works. Thank you.

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B001OI1YN4
http://www.amazon.com/dp/B001OI1YSO
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
In reply to Marci's question, I'll offer a few words describing my logo of Nonfiction in a Fictional Style. A number of years ago when I began writing books, I was looking for a description that fit my somewhat unusual approach. Tom Wolfe was one of my inspirations from the time he released The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test and The Kandy-Kolored Tangerine-Flake Streamline Baby. I think I once found a similar phrase describing his works. I write contemporary nonfiction about mostly nostalgic subjects for Baby Boomers. My talents have always been within the parameters of long, thoughtful research periods followed by short, enthusiastic bursts of creative energy. I don't write novels, or even anything approaching novels, but I don't compose long, boring details of scientific research, either. I try to build up a carefully crafted concept of previously disparate facts into a smoothly entertaining whole. If it's not fun to read, I don't write it.

If I was a famous television personality, I would be Bill Maher, Al Franken, or even John Stossel. I am at heart a social scientist and commentator. I got a psychology degree mostly because sociology was too easy. You could call me a social psychologist. When I was in college, I wanted to be an industrial psychologist, but the bottom quickly dropped out of that market, and due to a number of personal, family issues, I wound up in the credit and money business. I have been (in chronological order): a house painter, a bookkeeper, a store manager, a rock concert promoter, a small business owner, a credit manager, a traveling auditor, a private investigator, and an IRS tax examiner. Now I am retired on the lake with my two boats, two motorcycles, three cars, pickup truck, wife, and twelve cats. What else am I gonna do except play on the computer all day?

You may read the first chapter of my third book, The Last Horizon, and see that it is not very fun to read. It's not even a little bit funny. All I can say is that I'm sorry about that, but I had to lay the official psychological ground rules down to make the rest of the book make sense. I assure you that the remaining chapters are all about dating, sex, and the determination of the best vibrator. Of course, that statement isn't exactly true, either. There is a lot in there about narcissists, sleazebuckets, airheads, and other funny, but arrogant, sorts of people who harbor no plans for survival except their own. There is also a lot about how America needs to gets its collective head out of its rear end if it wants to survive the coming Chinese economic onslaught, but that fact is more implied than stated in the book. The Last Horizon is mostly an explanation of what I call the DNA of contemporary American society.

The reason I originally asked the experienced Kindle people about the formatting issues in Kindle versions of books is that my books by their very nature have a lot more opportunities for formatting conflicts to appear than do most standard novels. My books generally include a table of contents with sub-groups, credits, links, bibliography, and other material extraneous to the main body of the work. All of my Nonfiction in a Fictional Style books were designed to be read cover-to-cover, but they can also be read in short sessions like magazine articles, or even used as reference works left on the shelf. All of my books contain the fewest words to say the most. This has always been one of my goals; however, some readers may interpret my tone as too blunt. There is very little I can do about that if I want to say the things I want to communicate. You could view my work as coming from that particularly entertaining professor you had. You know the one, like the psychology prof I remember who taught his classes about the psychological statistics of gambling odds, or the literature teacher who always pointed out the sex scenes in famous works.

Pardon my long reply, but I felt like this was a prime opportunity to explain the unusual concept of my work. Thank you for asking.
 
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