Kindle Forum banner

1 - 20 of 129 Posts
D

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
My editor says 'all right' is correct, but I use 'alright' anyway because I think the other way looks horrid. One of the very few ways I go against my editor.
 
L

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Use what fits. Its only 'style' at the end of the day. Your reader will thank you for writing naturally. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,318 Posts
Alright immediately makes me think the author has an insufficient grasp of grammar. I know that's harsh, but it would color my view of the writing, and I don't think I'm alone. I'd use all right. It may be generational--maybe younger people think alright is--well, alright. But unless you're writing YA, I'd use the standard spelling.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
10,088 Posts
We're headed toward "alright." There are too many similar words (already, altogether, although, etc.) for "all right" not to reduce down to the same pattern. But it's going to take a few more generations. For now, "alright" is viewed as a misspelling by substantial chunk of readers, who learned the mnemonic "alright is not all right" in grade school. I don't see any benefit to ticking them off.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
72 Posts
Rosalind James said:
It may be generational--maybe younger people think alright is--well, alright. But unless you're writing YA, I'd use the standard spelling.
While it isn't based on facts, I feel fairly safe in saying that yes, it's a generational thing. I'm in my late twenties, and I have NEVER written all right to mean the same as alright. The same goes for all my friends and acquaintances, offline or online. All right feels cumbersome and unnecessary no matter how grammatically correct it might be. Of course, English is my second language. No matter how good we get at it, there'll always be subtleties or grammar we just don't get or go along with.

If people think less of my writing because of the use of alright instead of all right though, then... Well, that's their issue. I really think that's taking things too seriously, especially given that alright is not some obscure and arcane lingo. It's not something I'm going to change anyway, because I see no signs that the world is sticking to all right over alright.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
I usually use alright to say or state that it is fine. I think all right is more appropriate for saying everything is right or correct. Just my two cents though. :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,318 Posts
Nymirra said:
If people think less of my writing because of the use of alright instead of all right though, then... Well, that's their issue. I really think that's taking things too seriously, especially given that alright is not some obscure and arcane lingo. It's not something I'm going to change anyway, because I see no signs that the world is sticking to all right over alright.
It's not that people will say, "Well! THIS author's off my list! Toss THIS book aside!" It's more subtle than that. It would just tick a box for me, and I think for others as well., subtly color my view of the author's writing, maybe make me more alert for other issues. As I say, probably generational.

I say that as somebody who does a lot of incorrect stuff in her writing for "voice" purposes, which, yes, tick some readers off! So you can take my input simply as my two cents, for sure.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,573 Posts
Ain't ain't a word and you ain't gonna say it. How incredibly wrong all those English teachers were. It might be a purely generational thing, but in no world is alright a ghastly slip up. It's almost never done by accident, and it's almost always intentional.

1001nightspress said:
To me, alright says "I didn't even run a spellcheck, let alone use an editor or proofreader, before I published."
Spellcheck doesn't recognize 'alright' as an error.
Nymirra said:
While it isn't based on facts, I feel fairly safe in saying that yes, it's a generational thing. I'm in my late twenties, and I have NEVER written all right to mean the same as alright. The same goes for all my friends and acquaintances, offline or online. All right feels cumbersome and unnecessary no matter how grammatically correct it might be. Of course, English is my second language. No matter how good we get at it, there'll always be subtleties or grammar we just don't get or go along with.

If people think less of my writing because of the use of alright instead of all right though, then... Well, that's their issue. I really think that's taking things too seriously, especially given that alright is not some obscure and arcane lingo. It's not something I'm going to change anyway, because I see no signs that the world is sticking to all right over alright.
This.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,573 Posts
Rosalind James said:
I say that as somebody who does a lot of incorrect stuff in her writing for "voice" purposes, which, yes, tick some readers off! So you can take my input simply as my two cents, for sure.
I <3 fragments.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,705 Posts
I just can't accept that this is changing. I chalk this up to the explosion of the Internet forcing more people to use written language who had no clue how to do so, saddling us with a lot of their baggage. "Alright" was unacceptable in the early '90s. It hasn't been long enough for that to have truly changed. Consider "alot", which is still a common error but also still regarded as an error--and that's actually never changed in spite of enormous misuse. Likewise "noone" is still wrong; it's "no one" (American) or "no-one" (British), but never one word, yet though the one word misspelling persists it is still considered a misspelling.

As for the notion that "all right" and "alright" have distinct meanings from one another: that's totally wrong. That's something the pro-misspelling camp made up because when they read the correct form, they're pronouncing the space between the words and internalizing it. That's really no different than seeing certain loan words and phrases in print and not making the link with their spoken forms we may be more familiar with, like hors d'oeuvres. That's a simple mental disconnect that's easily fixed through familiarity.

Anyway whether it's really changing or that's just a widespread excuse, the "variant" form does look like sloppy or nonexistent editing. That impression will persist for a long time.
 
D

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
jenminkman said:
Alright is British spelling.
All right is American, though British people also use all right now. Probably because everything's Americanizing (or Americanising? LOL) anyway.
Is it really? If so, that explains me wanting to use alright, as I'm Australian and British spelling is what we use. It may be a generational thing - I'm not that young, in my mid thirties, but I don't think I've written all right in my life. Just seems odd to me.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
63,461 Posts
Interesting discussion. I'll have to go read the OK/O.K./okay discussion now. ;D

From http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/us/definition/american_english/all-right

The merging of all and right to form the one-word spelling alright is first recorded toward the end of the 19th century (unlike other similar merged spellings such as altogether and already, which date from much earlier). There is no logical reason for insisting that all right be two words when other single-word forms such as altogether have long been accepted. Nevertheless, although found widely, alright remains nonstandard.
:D
 
1 - 20 of 129 Posts
Top