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One of the most awesome things about being an indie author is that you can do it from just about anywhere. All you really need is 1) a bank account, and 2) an occasional internet connection. For that reason, indie publishing is a great fit for anyone who wants to get out and roam the world for a bit.

Back in 2012, I decided to take an English teaching gig out in the Republic of Georgia. It was pretty dang awesome! I didn't speak a word of the language when I got there, and after a ten-day orientation course, they shipped me out to the western half of the country, where almost no one speaks English. I spent the first five weeks in Kutaisi, living in the old "Krushchevka" apartments that haven't been renovated since they were built in the 1960s. I lived with a family of seven (mother, father, grandmother, and 21, 18, 16, and 10 year old children--though to be fair, the 21 year old was in Tbilisi for university) in an apartment that had less than 300 square feet. There was a glass wall between the room where I slept and the family room, and one of the glass panels was out, so the only thing giving me any privacy from the rest of the family was a thin white curtain and a piano.

After that, I spent four months in a tiny village about half an hour south of Kutaisi, in a farmhouse where we grew most of our food, made our own wine, and were pretty much off the grid except for electricity (which went out almost daily) and satellite TV. We drew our own water from the well, made our own cheese from the cow, had eggs each morning from the twenty or so chickens that roamed everywhere--it was great. Geese would fly overhead, and you'd hear gunshots from the back of the village church because everyone had Soviet-era guns that they'd go out hunting with. Wolves would sometimes come down from the mountains and eat our chickens.

I went backpacking one time in the mountains just south of the village. Went up with a Slovakian buddy I'd made through the ESL program. We climbed up above the treeline, turned around, and realized that what we thought were clouds were actually snow-capped peaks from the Greater Caucasus range just north of us. You could see all the major mountains, from Elbrus and Ushba in the west to Kazbeg in the east. The night was crystal clear, with the Milky Way stretching from one side of the sky to the other, and as we lay stargazing the International Space Station orbited right above us. Came down near Borjomi, the old hunting grounds of the Czars, and explored Akhaltsikhe near the Turkish border.

While I was living in the village, I actually ran into the people who made
. It was at the Tchavtchavadze bus station in Kutaisi that I met them, while I was up to visit the bazaar. We only chatted for a bit, but when I came back to the States I saw the movie and was like "I've been to all those places!"

It was around this time that my books really started to take off. I'd written the first four books in my Star Wanderers series at the beginning of the year, and published them over the summer. In November, Amazon made Outworlder perma-free, and the downloads and sales really started to take off. I was living in the village at the time, and only had internet access two or three times a week when I came in to Kutaisi. I'd buy a sundae at the local McDonalds (best place in the country to get internet), open up my netbook, and go to my KDP dashboard to see that I'd sold XXX hundred books since the last time I'd logged on. It was pretty awesome.

After all that, I came back to Utah, where I've been living ever since. I like it a lot here, but I'm starting to get the wanderlust again. In 2014, I decided that I wanted to explore the Czech Republic next--my ancestors emigrated from the villages around Ostrava back in the early 1900s, and I'd really like to see the home country (fun fact: "Vasicek" was apparently spelled "Waschiczek" back in the 18th century). But then I got involved in a relationship, which ended about six months ago, but that kind of threw my life plans up in the air.

So where are you guys at? Any other global nomads out there? Where have you been, and where do you hope to go? And how does your writing tie into it all?
 

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The Other Gerry Brown​

When I first came to Communist Laos, the capital, Vientiane, was internationally known as a 'city of spies'. Russians were everywhere and any Caucasian like myself was automatically assumed by the locals to be a Russian and would be addressed in Russian. But politics and international intrigue were not my concern -- I had come to search out some kind of paid employment in the capital, preferably teaching English -- my profession.

On the other side of the Mekong River from Laos was a small Thai town called Nong Khai. At that time, the town was bristling with tall radio receiving antennae so that signals coming and going between the tiny satellite state and Moscow could be picked up by the CIA. I had been living for several months in a Buddhist monastery outside of the town, but my money had started running out, as had my visa. So I began venturing into bars in town and meeting some foreigners who had various contacts in the Lao capital. One of these was an American called Gerry Brown. Gerry was full of outlandish stories, such as: "Jim Thompson ran the gay network for the CIA. He was very good at it too, until he escaped to China in a submarine with his Malaysian boyfriend." and "Denis Thatcher and me go way back -- we meet for drinks at the Carlton Club every time I'm in London." and "I was the highest-ranking CIA officer to go public against the Vietnam war."

Another thing Gerry said was that he had many contacts in Laos and would be able to set me up in my own English language school with paying students if I met him on one of his many trips to the capital. There were no English language schools in the capital at that time -- mine would be the first. He said he would be in Laos for a month in two weeks' time and would be drinking beer every afternoon in 'the Russian Club' which he said was his usual hangout.

After several weeks walking the streets of the capital, knocking on doors looking for work, I decided to follow up on Gerry's dubious offer. But where was this mysterious 'Russian Club'? I had not come across it or even heard it mentioned up to that time. Eventually, I found a tuk-tuk driver who said he knew the location of the Russian Club and I climbed into his cab. We arrived at a high-walled compound with a huge steel gate. At the side of the gate was a plaque with backwards-facing letters engraved in it. Obviously Russian, so I had found the right place and rang a bell on the wall so I could be let in and hopefully have a beer or two with Gerry and get some useful information.

A small door in the gate was opened by a very fat, elderly woman who began barking at me in backwards-facing letters. I don't speak Russian so I had no idea what she was saying, but she ushered me inside and put me in a small room just inside the compound. The room contained only one table, two chairs and a portrait of Yuri Gagarin on the wall. I sat there alone for nearly an hour, occasionally standing up to peer out of a small window where I could make out a distant tennis court. "I wonder if Gerry plays tennis here as well as drinking beer," I thought.

Eventually, the door opened and a tall, blonde Russian guy came in, sat down opposite me and placed his hands palm down on the table.

Russian Guy: (Speaks in backwards-facing letters)

Philip: Sorry, I don't speak Russian.

Russian Guy: Who are you?

Philip: Er, my name's Philip. I'm from England and I'm an English teacher. I just came to Vientiane a couple of weeks ago.

Russian guy: And vai are you here?

Philip: I've come to meet Gerry Brown.

Russian guy: Zees name is nothing for me! Who is zees........Gerry Brown?

(At his point, I'm thinking maybe best not to mention any of Gerry's CIA stories)

Philip: Gerry is an American friend of mine. He said to come and meet him here.

Russian guy: And vot are you going to do here with zees.........Gerry Brown?

Philip: Er,....drink beer?

Russian guy: (Slams palms hard hands down on the table) Vot kind of story eez theez!!!? Vot kind of story eez theez!!!? You are British!...........You come to the Soviet Embassy to drink beer with an American!!! Vot kind of story eez theez!!!?

Philip: (highly embarrassed) Oh, this isn't the Russian Club then?

Russian guy: I know nothing of zees...........Russian Club of which you speak!

Philip: Oh, well,............... where do you drink beer then?

Russian guy: Here.........and zer.

(I did eventually find the Russian Club where I met Gerry Brown again. It was a small ,extremely seedy bar on the banks of the Mekong frequented by the weirdest collection of drunken expatriates I have ever come across -- including Gerry.)

________________________________________________

An Inadequate Christmas​

I'm sure many have had some wonderful Christmases with family and friends in varied locations. Unfortunately, my Christmases have often had something of a sideways-leaning, ironic and comical aspect to them. Often in inappropriate locations revealing myself in a less than flattering light. The one that comes to mind happened in Vientiane, Laos a few years back.

The country had only just opened up to the outside world and its traditions like Christmas. My sons (7 and 9 years old) had never experienced a full-on Christmas celebration, but the largest, high-end hotel in town now advertised:

Special Christmas day lunch!

Roast Turkey with stuffing and all the trimmings prepared by our new European chef!
Mince pies!
Appearance by Father Christmas!
Special Christmas gifts for the children!
Christmas carols!
And much, much more!
Great! I thought. I'll take the wife and kids..........they'll love it!

But we were the only foreigners to show up for the lunch. Never mind. The roast turkey was O.K. and there was a Christmas tree (with lights). After the meal, we sat back and waited for the Communist Santa to appear. We waited for ages, but no Communist Santa appeared. I went to the front desk to inquire when Santa would be appearing. The clerk claimed to know nothing of this Santa Claus person, so I asked him to get the manager. The manager came and told me that the Christmas festivities had been canceled due to lack of interest.

I was so angry - my kids had been really looking forward to seeing Santa and getting a present from him, so I berated the manager telling him that we had come for this very expensive Christmas lunch ONLY because they had advertised that Santa would be appearing with gifts for the children. I'm ashamed now to admit that I shouted at him:

"Well, this is not good enough!.....I want Santa Claus down here!!!......And I want him down here right now!!!"

The manager said he would see what he could do and I went back to our table. Thirty minutes later a young, incredibly skinny Lao guy in a badly-fitting Santa Claus costume (but no white beard) appeared, carrying a plastic shopping bag. He nervously approached our table and handed each of my sons a small bag of sweets. The poor man obviously had no idea of the role he was supposed to be playing so, still angry, I stared him in the face and ordered:

"Say.....Ho! Ho! Ho!"

In a deadpan voice he whispered out "How...How...How."

Oh, boy! Not very good.

And not the best Christmas I've ever had. These days we try to celebrate Christmas in our house the best way we can.

Philip
 

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My second year of college, I decided that it just wasn't for me.  I was struggling with severe bipolar disorder at the time, and wasn't able to medicate for it because I was in college and could barely afford to eat, let alone pay for medical expenses.  One night in January, I just decided I was done.  I knew a friend had an open door, where about eight people stayed any given night, so I went up there for a few days just to see if I could sort my self out.  After staying there, I decided that I  just needed to get out of PNW.  So he drove me back to Portland to get onto a Greyhound and stayed with me until my bus came.

The first place I went was San Diego.  I knew a couple who lived there, having met them through the internet, and stayed with them before for a few days when we decided to go to Las Vegas together.  One of them was a pornographer, and the other was a cartoonist and a newspaper editor.  They lived in a small one-bedroom apartment with two ferrets, five chinchillas,  a couple of rats, a tank full of giant cockroaches, and an opossum.  I stayed on their couch for a couple of days, and then went to LA, where I performed illegal street magic to pay for meals and another bus ticket to Las Vegas. 

In Las Vegas, I did the same thing.  Illegal street magic, and managed to get free hotel rooms by signing up for casino cards I was never going to use.  I actually sold those too, which you're not supposed to do, but shh.  I was staying down on Fremont for a while, and walking up to the Strip to look for work and busk.  That is a LONG walk, and I was doing it twice daily for about three weeks, before finally landing a job at a magic shop and getting enough money to move into some rathole closer to the strip.  That place was terrible.  It was a hotel/apartment.  I'm not sure which one it was.  It came pre-furnished, but only had a sofa, a dresser, and a TV.  That was it.  And it wasn't even a real sofa.  It was like, half a sofa with no arm rests, and it was on wheels, so it would move away from the wall sometimes.  So bad.  I was still pretty broke, because that place was expensive, and basically living off green tea and ramen.  The only reason I ate between paycheques was because we had daily sales bonuses if the store made above a certain amount, and we hit it about 2-3 times a week.

After a couple months doing that, I moved in with a woman I worked with, and her three kids.  She was way out in Northtown, and we only worked the same shift at the same location once a week, so the other four days, I was on my own.  I spent about four hours on the bus every day, getting from Northtown to what was then the Aladdin.  I remember having this pocket radio I'd listen to, and taking forever to realise it was the thing that interfered with the bus speakers whenever the driver announced a stop.  Shortly after that, I managed to get an iPod with all the money I had from paying $600 a month for rent on a full time job.

That summer, my husband came back from Germany, where he'd been for work.  Which, I hadn't gone with him, because I had stupidly let myself be talked into going to college in the States instead.  He wound up out in Barstow, and I went with him, because you know.  That's what you do.  Wow, was that awful.  I mean, at least there are things to do in Las Vegas, but Barstow is a hole.  Nothing happened at all in the sixteen months we lived there, except for the time I inadvertently terrorised the neighbour kids.  I had been walking back from the shop in the middle of winter, and was walking behind these kids.  At one point, they looked back at me, and then just ran ahead.  I figured it was just kids being kids, and ignored it.  Then they slowed down, and I caught up again.  And they looked back and ran around the corner.  I followed, because I lived down that street too.  I caught up, they looked back, and ran across the street.  To the side of the road I lived on.  I crossed, they looked back, and then ran into the very next house.  I'm not even sure any of them lived there, but didn't think about any of it until getting home a few minutes later.  I got inside, took off my gloves and my brown Indiana Jones hat, and my red and black striped sweater, and just kind of stopped as I realised what had just happened. 

After sixteen months in purgatory, we went back to Vegas.  Then we finally came back to PDX a few years ago.  I miss the weather down there, and our apartment that was right next to everything, but I prefer the public transport up here.  Unless you need to go across the river to Washington.  Then a 20 minute drive turns into a four-hour bus ride.
 

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For reasons too long and complex to write here, I decided I wanted to go teach for a year somewhere. After several job offers and interviews, I accepted an ESL teaching job in Siberia. I packed two suitcases and my pets and moved there without knowing anybody. The job was with a small school and not through an agency, so it was a huge risk (no support of any kind).

Was meant to be there for a year but ended up staying three and a half. I started working for a small language school and ended up teaching at a university. The job was so much fun but it didn't pay well, so that's when I started focusing on freelancing (writing articles) more and more as a way to make ends meet. Novosobirsk (Siberia's "unofficial" capital) is actually a huge place of over one million residents, though it still looks and works very much like an old Soviet town. I loved the winter there (LOVED it) and met some great people, but also experienced probably the worst examples of greed I've ever seen anywhere. In the end, I just coulnd't take it anymore and left.

My next stop was Vietnam. Of all the places I've seen in my life, this is the only country I wish I could take back. Nature is gorgeous there. I've been to every single country in Southeast Asia and I still think Vietnam is the prettiest. But the horrible things I saw there regarding animal abuse will be burned in my brain forever. I lived in fear my dogs would be stolen and eaten and I hated the electricity outtages (twice a week, on schedule, throughout the entire summer), the dirt, the nosy neighbors peeking in your windows (my next-door neighbor would actually stand next to my kitchen window and look in). Ended up in a relationship with an American guy and that was a disaster too. Longest 14 months of my life before I left for Thailand, alone (well, dogs in tow, of course).

I couldn't afford renting a house in Bangkok (and I needed a small yard so the dogs could run around, so an apartment was out of the question) so I went directly to Hua Hin, a small beach town two and a half hours south of Bangkok. Lots of expats, although they were mostly retired people. Settled pretty well here, eventually bought a car and had lots of road trips. Because Bangkok is so well connected to everywhere, I could fly to Singapore, Hong Kong, Malaysia, Laos and Cambodia for pennies. I spent a lot of time exploring Southeast Asia. I love history and architecture so this was amazing. Worst part of living in Thailand? Snakes randomly showing up in my yard all the time. I ended up adopting a third dog, an adult stray I picked up from the streets. She hates snakes with a passion so went after every single one that made it into my yard. I thought for sure I would either end up having a heart attack or she would end up dead in one of those fights.

She made it.

My ultimate goal was always to end up in Europe somewhere. I had a few countries in mind, but moving to Europe as a freelancer is tricky. Most countries want you to either have a job offer or to prove income before they let you move right in. Ended up settling for Prague (visited in 2005 and fell in love with the place). Took me almost nine months of paperwork for me and the dogs before we could board a plane. Got to Prague at the end of August 2014 and by January I had long-term residency. I love it here. Love it. Love it. Love it. Prague is so ridiculously beautiful. Unless they decide to kick me out for some reason, I think this is it.
 

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I was in Prague for a bit too. Originally from England, I spent a year teaching English in Prague followed by some time as an au pair in Hameln, Germany. Finally settled down in Pittsburgh, PA in the United States when I married a local. I hope to travel a lot more when we've saved up a little and paid off some of those pesky American school loans. Eventually I see myself somewhere in Europe, though I want to explore many other places across the globe.

I just wish I made an income from writing which could support my travel habit!
 

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I'm currently living in Bogota Colombia. I don't really consider myself true global nomad because I'm not sure I could survive on my writing income alone. Hopefully when I leave in two years time!

Joe - Georgia is one of my favourite places in the world! I spent a couple of months hopping around there in 2006. I love Kasbegi and Zvaneti in particular and long to go back. I put on so much weight because each time I reached a new village the locals would sit me down and force feed me khachapuri and homemade wine until I could not move. Sakartvelo lamasi!
 

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Do any of you guys find inspiration from the countries or cities that you have chosen as your new home? Or from places you have stayed?

I find China very inspiring; not all in a rose-tinted way, an equal mix of good and bad. Makes for interesting writing.
 

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Do any of you guys find inspiration from the countries or cities that you have chosen as your new home? Or from places you have stayed?
I lived in Japan for a year. I taught English in a small city in Nagano prefecture. Nothing as exotic as Siberia, Vietnam, or Thailand--but the culture in Japan is so different.* It definitely helped my writing, and I often write Japanese characters.

When my kids are out of the house, I would like to live in another country for a while. My husband is open to it. I would love to go back to Japan, but it would be sad because I think many of my Japanese friends will have passed away by the time I can go. (I was friends with a lot of people in their 40s and 50s even though I was in my 20s.)

*Some foreigners go to Japan stay for a week and say "It's so Westernized!" It is not. It is very advanced technologically--more so than the west--but the Japanese culture is NOT western.
 

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I lived in Japan for a year too. I'd not say they are technologically advanced. When did you live there? I felt like nothing has advanced in the last 20 years or so. It's like they made crazy awesome trains and toilets then have just rested on their laurels :) But stuff like having to go to the post office and filling out paper forms that the staff key into the system to pay for things, because online payments are unheard of -- things like that drove me bonkers (esp when the forms had to be filled out in Japanese).

I lived in a traditional Japanese house in Tokyo. It was gorgeous -- in spring and autumn. The rest of the year you either froze or overheated. I've been back a heap of times and am going back later this year.

My plans also include Prague :) Plus some time in Berlin and Geneva.
 

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Nomading is a great (and easy) way to develop story material but after 30yrs as a nomad I got tired of it and now I just travel.  (A month in Sicily last year.)  Meantime, I'm putting those 30yrs of nomad experience into my novels, and that's another kind of travel.
 

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I am a true global nomad.

Born in Sweden, I married an Irish diplomat at the age of 20. Since then, I  have lived (apart from  my home country, Sweden)  in Australia, Ireland, France, Belgium (twice) and Holland.  I now live permanently in Ireland.

My books are set in nearly all the countries I've lived in, with a preference for France and Ireland.

I feel so lucky to have experienced so many different cultures, which so enriched my writing. If you have lived in a country a few years, you get an in-depth knowledge of the people, the history and their way of life. It's an invaluable experience and such a treasure trove for a writer.
 

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I would've loved to live in Japan (was there in 2008 but only for a few days) but I take my dogs with me everywhere I go and Japan has crazy quarantine rules. Same reason I didn't move to Singapore (and ended up in Thailand instead). Plus the fact that everything costs a fortune in Singapore didn't help either.

Hanoi was a nightmare. It's a shame because I think Vietnam has some of the most beautiful nature (and most interesting historical sites) in all of Southeast Asia, but I just couldn't deal with all the dog torture and the prehistoric living rules.

Prague is a paradise for dog lovers. Has been voted the "most dog-friendly city in the world" over and over and I can take my dogs EVERYWHERE: metro, buses, cafes and restaurants, public offices, pubs, even many museums and historical attractions. I'm hoping to make Prague my permanent home and just travel from now on. Moving from country to country gets tiring and I'd much rather just have a home base somewhere and just explore.
 

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I'm glad this was brought up, because I've been considering more and more traveling to the UK, and perhaps even in the future living there, as a way of being a gateway to Europe. I'd love to be in a place to where if I wanted to hop a train to France or Greece, all I needed to do was book the journey and it wasn't a long one. Or driving over for a weekend.

But the thought came up as to... what if you decided to live in some place, like the UK or Japan permanently. I'm a writer with an S Corp. Can you technically operate it from another country? Or would you have to move your company to the place you're living? And would it be better to keep it open here and simply pay yourself, or if the other country would be better? I mean, tax wise, I realize different countries would be better or worse. I mean simply, if you said you were going to live in the UK forever now, you've taken your citizen test and everything... then what?

(Totally realizing one would probably need and accountant and lawyer for these questions, but thought I'd get a general gist for my what if scenario.)
 

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NothingsShocking said:
Do any of you guys find inspiration from the countries or cities that you have chosen as your new home? Or from places you have stayed?

I find China very inspiring; not all in a rose-tinted way, an equal mix of good and bad. Makes for interesting writing.
I've got a novel out that I had intended to be a romance, just to try out the genre. It utterly fails as a romance, and wound up being an 80k love letter to Las Vegas.
 

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Joe Vasicek said:
One of the most awesome things about being an indie author is that you can do it from just about anywhere. All you really need is 1) a bank account, and 2) an occasional internet connection. For that reason, indie publishing is a great fit for anyone who wants to get out and roam the world for a bit.

Back in 2012, I decided to take an English teaching gig out in the Republic of Georgia. It was pretty dang awesome! I didn't speak a word of the language when I got there, and after a ten-day orientation course, they shipped me out to the western half of the country, where almost no one speaks English. I spent the first five weeks in Kutaisi, living in the old "Krushchevka" apartments that haven't been renovated since they were built in the 1960s. I lived with a family of seven (mother, father, grandmother, and 21, 18, 16, and 10 year old children--though to be fair, the 21 year old was in Tbilisi for university) in an apartment that had less than 300 square feet. There was a glass wall between the room where I slept and the family room, and one of the glass panels was out, so the only thing giving me any privacy from the rest of the family was a thin white curtain and a piano.

After that, I spent four months in a tiny village about half an hour south of Kutaisi, in a farmhouse where we grew most of our food, made our own wine, and were pretty much off the grid except for electricity (which went out almost daily) and satellite TV. We drew our own water from the well, made our own cheese from the cow, had eggs each morning from the twenty or so chickens that roamed everywhere--it was great. Geese would fly overhead, and you'd hear gunshots from the back of the village church because everyone had Soviet-era guns that they'd go out hunting with. Wolves would sometimes come down from the mountains and eat our chickens.

I went backpacking one time in the mountains just south of the village. Went up with a Slovakian buddy I'd made through the ESL program. We climbed up above the treeline, turned around, and realized that what we thought were clouds were actually snow-capped peaks from the Greater Caucasus range just north of us. You could see all the major mountains, from Elbrus and Ushba in the west to Kazbeg in the east. The night was crystal clear, with the Milky Way stretching from one side of the sky to the other, and as we lay stargazing the International Space Station orbited right above us. Came down near Borjomi, the old hunting grounds of the Czars, and explored Akhaltsikhe near the Turkish border.

While I was living in the village, I actually ran into the people who made
. It was at the Tchavtchavadze bus station in Kutaisi that I met them, while I was up to visit the bazaar. We only chatted for a bit, but when I came back to the States I saw the movie and was like "I've been to all those places!"

It was around this time that my books really started to take off. I'd written the first four books in my Star Wanderers series at the beginning of the year, and published them over the summer. In November, Amazon made Outworlder perma-free, and the downloads and sales really started to take off. I was living in the village at the time, and only had internet access two or three times a week when I came in to Kutaisi. I'd buy a sundae at the local McDonalds (best place in the country to get internet), open up my netbook, and go to my KDP dashboard to see that I'd sold XXX hundred books since the last time I'd logged on. It was pretty awesome.

After all that, I came back to Utah, where I've been living ever since. I like it a lot here, but I'm starting to get the wanderlust again. In 2014, I decided that I wanted to explore the Czech Republic next--my ancestors emigrated from the villages around Ostrava back in the early 1900s, and I'd really like to see the home country (fun fact: "Vasicek" was apparently spelled "Waschiczek" back in the 18th century). But then I got involved in a relationship, which ended about six months ago, but that kind of threw my life plans up in the air.

So where are you guys at? Any other global nomads out there? Where have you been, and where do you hope to go? And how does your writing tie into it all?
The USA, Europe and Asia.

I write on the move. Three of my books have mostly been written overseas while traveling.

Mountain Hold was written in a frenzied burst of activity in 2012-3.

Way Captain 2013-4.

Upcoming Golden Odyssey 2014-5.

While in my little piece of Mountain Paradise (you can probably guess which book I wrote under its influence) ;) I made this video, among many many others:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V0Ms4g6Cysw

I have another ten books Minimum that I intent to craft so more traveling is forecast!

Your working holiday to Georgia sounded interesting, well done for making the adventure. Few people travel to live, but just to tourist it I find nowadays.
 

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There are actually quite a few of us here in Prague. David Gaughran is here. He's a real global nomad: Ireland / Sweden / South America / Czech Republic. Simon Whistler from the RSP podcast is also in Prague now.

I moved to Prague permanently in mid-2000, after spending summers here in 1998 and 1999. It's a great town, and not just for dogs. Aside from its own attractions, it's an excellent location if you like to travel, which means it's great for my work. But I don't feel like a nomad anymore. I'm settled. I have permanent residency here. My kids go to school here. In terms of work, though, I'm still free. I could do what I do just about anywhere in the world.

Recently I asked my wife if she'd consider moving abroad for a year or two, as I realized that I miss the feeling of freedom and strangeness that you get when you move to a new country. One option would be Greece, where I've travelled but never lived long-term. Another option would be Texas, where we have family. After 15 years as an expat, going back to the US would be strange indeed.

Tobias should pipe up here. He bounces between Corfu and Spain, if I remember correctly.

 

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I've lived in the UK and Italy, but I'm in the UK for good now. I'm rubbish at living abroad. I miss British culture (such as it is) too much, although I do have the occasional hankering to live in the US.
 

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NothingsShocking said:
Do any of you guys find inspiration from the countries or cities that you have chosen as your new home? Or from places you have stayed?

I find China very inspiring; not all in a rose-tinted way, an equal mix of good and bad. Makes for interesting writing.
I lived in China for almost five years as a trailing spouse, meaning my husband took a job and we became temporary residents. My time there inspired a memoir, then subsequently the rest of my titles. For me personally, the injustices of life the Chinese people have to live with daily make me feel such emotion, and a passion to inform the rest of the world. In my own American bubble, hardship comes around every so often, affecting some families but never touching others. But to the Chinese people, hardship is just their normal as they traverse the many obstacles their own government sets before them. I learned a lot as an expat there, but the most important truth I walked away with was the fact that the people in China are resilient in their efforts to just survive. I'll probably be telling their stories until I'm far too old to see the computer screen any longer.
 
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