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Discussion Starter #1
I'm thinking about getting Lasik for myself, but I'm nervous about the recovery time.  I write web content for a living and even though I have some financial padding saved up, it's not a huge amount.  I can't take, say, a month off of working.  So for anyone here who has gotten Lasik:

How long was it until your eyes healed enough that you could stare at a screen and type for a Pomodoro/half hour at a time?
How long until you felt like your eyes were completely recovered and you could watch the screen for hours straight?
Did you notice any blurring vision, distortions at night, etc? I know that some people who have gotten the procedure can't drive after dark because they see halos of light, and as a night owl I do a lot of my writing at night, so ... nervous about that, too.
Finally, are you happy with your vision, post-surgery?  Would you go through Lasik again?

Thanks!
 

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I had LASIK a few years ago. I went back to work day two and I was back to writing at my normal rate after a few days. Unless you have a complication, you shouldn't have any trouble getting back to work.

I'm really happy I had the procedure, but it's not without side effects. My eyes are dryer now and I have some mild night vision issues (slightly worse than what I had with glasses, some halos, blurring of lights, and loss of contrast sensitivity) but nothing serious. I do wear computer glasses (not Rx tinted lenses) when I work, which really helps my eyes relax in front of a screen.
 

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EllieDee said:
I'm thinking about getting Lasik for myself, but I'm nervous about the recovery time. I write web content for a living and even though I have some financial padding saved up, it's not a huge amount. I can't take, say, a month off of working. So for anyone here who has gotten Lasik:

How long was it until your eyes healed enough that you could stare at a screen and type for a Pomodoro/half hour at a time?
How long until you felt like your eyes were completely recovered and you could watch the screen for hours straight?
Did you notice any blurring vision, distortions at night, etc? I know that some people who have gotten the procedure can't drive after dark because they see halos of light, and as a night owl I do a lot of my writing at night, so ... nervous about that, too.
Finally, are you happy with your vision, post-surgery? Would you go through Lasik again?

Thanks!
I haven't but friends of mine have and they said it took around a few days to a week before they were okay. They all raved about it. I nearly got it done but I like my specs :)
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for chiming in, everybody!  It sounds like the recovery will be a lot better than I was kind of expecting or braced for.  I'm probably getting nervous over nothing but, you know, these are my eyes ... I'd rather end up deaf than blind (despite my deep, abiding love of music!).
 
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EllieDee said:
I'm thinking about getting Lasik for myself, but I'm nervous about the recovery time. I write web content for a living and even though I have some financial padding saved up, it's not a huge amount. I can't take, say, a month off of working. So for anyone here who has gotten Lasik:

How long was it until your eyes healed enough that you could stare at a screen and type for a Pomodoro/half hour at a time? Could see well immediately after sitting up from the procedure. Went home and took a nap, was ordered to keep eyes closed for 2 hours. Woke up and could see clearly, had no issues resting & reading my kindle or working on my PC that evening.

How long until you felt like your eyes were completely recovered and you could watch the screen for hours straight? My eyes never felt that there was anything wrong with them, other than a mild dryness that happened for about two days which was managed by drops. I never felt that I had to strain or had any issues viewing the TV or PC screen. I recall being amazed I could watch the TV across the room the night of my procedure, and waking up the next morning and being able to see out the window.

Did you notice any blurring vision, distortions at night, etc? I know that some people who have gotten the procedure can't drive after dark because they see halos of light, and as a night owl I do a lot of my writing at night, so ... nervous about that, too.I had that issue before the Lasik, and it is now resolved. The only change (which the doc told me would likely happen as I age) is that I sometimes use reading glasses for looking at things very close,
but even the least powerful ones are too much and kinda give me a headache. I usually just squint for a second and it works fine.


Finally, are you happy with your vision, post-surgery? Would you go through Lasik again? OMG, yes, yes and yes! I am thrilled with the results and I still feel like it's Christmas every day when I wake up and can see without glasses/contacts, or every time I make it to the bathroom in the middle of the night without running into a wall. I do it a 100 times over.

I highly recommend going for it. Finding a good doctor is essential; don't even try to go for a discount deal. My doc did procedures on some of the Philadelphia Eagles players and was about $5000 for both eyes 5 years ago, and he even gave me a video of him performing the procedure on me. (Which is really gross, but my ex & daughter watched it live from the private waiting room apparently haha!) I'd recommend looking into the average price in your area and don't go with someone who seems to be a "deal". You definitely get what you pay for!

Thanks!
 

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I had LASIK about a decade ago. Best thing I ever did.

I think I had mine on a Friday and was back at work no worries on Monday. At the time I was doing consulting work which is lots of computer/reading time and twelve hour days. Don't recall any issues with eye strain. I did use a lot of eye drops in the first six months after. The most annoying thing was the wearing eye protection the first few nights so I wouldn't rub my eyes in my sleep. No night vision issues.

I will say, take the full dose of whatever it is they offer you to relax you before the surgery. I am not a medicine person so asked if I could take a half dose instead and the doctor said okay and then had to yell at my during the surgery to hold my eyes still or else he wasn't going to be able to finish it. I figured I'd be completely calm because I'd wanted the surgery but the minute I heard that buzzing sound I must've rolled my eyes in panic.
 

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[My posts have been deleted in response to the unannounced KBoards TOS change that was made by the new forum owner (VerticalScope) -- I do not agree to the new terms and have requested that my account be deleted as well]
 

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I had cataract surgery and even that did not keep me from reading or writing, as they did one eye at a time, allowing a week for recovery before doing the other eye.

 

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I would add a word of caution - it's not a forever fix, at least not in my case. I had mine done 15 years ago and much like other people here, it took a couple of days for the blurriness to disappear and another two or three weeks to completely settle. I found the only real problem was shifting from close up work to focusing on things further away, but that finally settled, too, and I was delighted with the results.
However, a couple of years ago, I noticed I was having trouble reading  things in the distance, for example, a street sign a block away. I got glasses for driving, but they throw my peripheral vision off, so I'm better without them. It is probably just age, and there may not be a solution, but I plan to go back to the original surgeon before long and see what he suggests.
 

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At my "real" job (I'm an optician), I hear and see the good, the bad, and the ugly sides of Lasik. My brother had it as well. I've not personally had it, but I can certainly give you what information I've gleaned.

The good side is that it can improve your vision substantially, to the point where you may not "need" corrective lenses. A lot of satisfied Lasik customers come to my workplace, only needing glasses in order to enhance the good vision the surgery gave them. Some places even offer a warranty renewal, so that when the effects of the surgery start to wear off (and they do) they'll redo it at a discount. My brother's surgery went well, no complications, and he never reported any adverse side-effects. The biggest plus (for most people) is not having to wear glasses or contacts.

The bad side is that you'll always see better with corrective lenses, even with Lasik. And you absolutely MUST be careful who you choose to perform the surgery, because for as many good eye surgeons as there are, there are plenty of bad ones. The prices tend to be expensive as well. Do your research. There are medical risks as well. Not all people take the surgery the same way. One patient I saw had one of her pupils dilate and never return to its normal size. I even saw a case of "laser burn" once, which is pretty much scarring of the eye or retina, due to a botched Lasik surgery. And again, Lasik isn't exactly permanent, because your vision still deteriorates over time. You'd also better hope you don't get cataracts, because you cannot have Lasik while you have them.

The ugly side of Lasik shows up when dealing with insurances, vision or medical. Lasik is usually considered a medical procedure, but that doesn't mean a Medicare or Blue Cross card will give you cost coverage. Most insurances in my experience won't pay the bill for Lasik, due to it not being medically necessary, though some will take a bite out of the price. If you have optical insurance, consult your provider and get a copy of your most recent eye care benefits. That should let you know whether Lasik is billable to insurance (don't ask if it's "covered," because nothing ever is. Insurances love to tell you that they'll "cover" something, when really it's up to them whether or not they foot the bill. Any vision center worth its salt won't use "covered" because they know they can't guarantee payment by the insurance company). And be aware that not all places who perform Lasik surgery will accept the same insurances, which will limit your options. Combined insurances (vision/medical/pharmaceutical) are especially troublesome for them. Know your provider and have all your cards ready if/when you go in.
 

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To the insurance point. I had a Health Savings Account through my employer at the time and was able to use that to pay for it. It was my own money I was paying for the procedure, but at least it was money that was pre-tax and I could do the procedure in the early part of the year and be reimbursed even though I contributed to the account throughout the entire year.

And, for me personally, I had struggled with glasses and contact lenses. I started with soft lenses, had to move to hard lenses, and by the time I had the procedure had moved to wearing glasses because even the hard lenses gave me issues. So, for me personally, LASIK gave me much better vision because I actually had full peripheral vision back. Not to mention not having hassles with glasses/contacts.

(Having LASIK also allowed me to feel comfortable skydiving a few years after that, although I'd say that's not a consideration for most people.)

I will also add that at the time I went to one of the top LASIK surgeons in the area, because I agree that the quality of the surgeon is incredibly important when dealing with something as sensitive as your eyes. My aunt had it done in Canada when it still wasn't approved in the US and had to go back and have it retouched about six months later. For me I was 20/15 after the surgery and have been for ten-plus years since. I'm close to the age when I will end up needing reading glasses, but the surgeon warned me that would happen eventually.

It's not a cure all, but it was definitely worth it. For me.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Thanks again for everyone weighing in, especially Kal. I appreciate hearing from an optician! I went in for a consultation/initial exam at the lasik place yesterday so I feel like I can connect the facts a little more.

I'm going to one of the best clinics in Europe to (potentially) get it done and paying out of pocket, so thankfully I won't have to deal with insurance company stupidity. The Lasik clinic did briefly mention the possibility of me buying a 'lifetime warranty' which at the time I thought was pretty weird. What am I doing there, buying a big screen TV? When I went to a hospital with a broken leg, no one offered me a warranty! But I'm glad to hear that this is a legit service these places offer and not some kind of Bad Sign that I should run, run, run away from this particular clinic.

When I went in for the exam, they told me I am a candidate for surgery IF I can get my dry eyes under control. Apparently I have a condition that causes inflammation of the eyelids, and resultant reduced tear production? I didn't realize I had a problem, but since I've been taking the prescribed eye drops my eyes have felt noticeably more comfortable and less sensitive. So while I try to get my tear production into the normal range, I have more time to think about the procedure, work out the pros and cons, etc.

I've heard some terrible stories of people who got bad, bad complications from Lasik. Makes me nervous, not gonna lie. Of course, I've heard a lot of good stories too. I have to agree with Cassie that one big reason I want this is to have a bigger 'field of view' instead of seeing the world through a smallish clear space surrounded by a blur. Contact lenses aren't an option for me, I could never get used to them even though I really, really tried.

However, it's not like I hate wearing glasses. If it turns out I can't or don't want to get Lasik, I'll just spend the money on new frames and a new tattoo, haha.
 

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Kal, that's interesting what you say. My Lasik was done by one of the leading eye surgeons in the UK, and he said he had performed many 'corrective' operations on people who had gone for the cheapest option and suffered damage as a result. So, EllieDee, my advice is get it done, but don't try to cut corners on the cost. Despite the fact that I could no longer tolerate contact lenses and glasses didn't correct my vision, the NHS still considered it to be elective cosmetic surgery (I guess being able to see, drive and work is 'cosmetic') and I had to foot the substantial bill myself.
 

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I had it done many years ago.  It was around $4000.00 - no insurance - but well worth it.  My eyesight is still 20/20.

I did have very bad night vision though for about a year or so after the surgery.  Fine now.
 
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