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I also enjoyed The Richmond Thief. Read it when it was in Prime the first time. Have the second on my Prime/KOLL wish list .. Maybe I'll grab it for my KOLL borrow for June.
 

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Discussion Starter · #342 ·
I haz it on my kindle via KU now.  ;D

Been doing total food inventory last couple of days so not much reading. I am talking chest freezer, fridge, fridge freeer, pantry etc. I am talking entering everything into an app with name, expiry, etc. Holy moly we have a lot of food.  :-X

Now I am ready to read again.
 

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I always wonder with a HM, is the author being fair to the true setting of the times, or am I getting cheated by someone who is just guessing what it was like "back when?" It's the time frame that entices me to read them, I wish I could time travel.
 

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Oh dear.  That link to thehistoryquill is going to keep me overloaded for ages.  Thank you.  Maybe.  Thank you?  That's it.
 

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Oh wow - I only have read two of the series on thehistoryquill's list: Deanna Raybourn's Veronica Speedwell and Kerry Greenwood's Phryne Fisher. Time to start looking at new stuff.

Had to check the spelling on Raybourn's last name and discovered that the first Veronica Speedwell is only $2.99

I forgot how to change the size with the manual link maker.
 

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Andra said:
I forgot how to change the size with the manual link maker.
where you see [img

leave a space and follow that with height=150

So the beginning of that section of code looks like this

[img height=150

Then close the bracket as usual and that will make a more reasonably sized image. :)
 

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  :'( Well, boo-hoo, I just caught up with two series: Lady Darby and Verity Kent, both by Anna Lee Huber.  I loved them both and am eagerly awaiting the next Verity Kent at the end of September.  It's set just after the first WW which is a different time line than I usually read and it's been pretty interesting.

I may have to break down and read one of the Sebastian St. Cyr stories I'm hoarding or I may try a new to me author Jacqueline Winspear's Maisie Dobbs, which looks like a similar time frame as Verity Kent, but a whiff later.

I hope everyone here is getting in some solid reading time!
 

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Discussion Starter · #350 ·
I am keeping a couple of St.Cyr back too. So I don't run out quite yet. I wish I could do selective memory delete and read that series from the beginning again. Sigh.

I am reading the latest in the Veronica Speedwell series by Deanna Raybourn. A Murderous Relation.

i am still quite slow with reading. I hadn't read any books in almost a month then teh contempo I read and followed with a Heyer. And now I am trying the Raybourn. I don't know what to blame it on. 2020? Ennui probably describes it better. Pain of existence.  :-X
 

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I have the advantage of having discovered the St. Cyr books rather later than you guys. When I say 'discovered' I mean of course enabled and enticed by the contributors to this thread.  :eek:

I've only read three so far, so by my reckoning I still have about twelve left to read.  ;D I keep changing my mind as to whether I want to devour a whole series in one go so I can find out what happens or keep swapping between all the other series I'm reading so they all last a bit longer. Decisions, decisions .....  :-\
 

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I've only read the first three, as well... trying to parse them out!

I'm 5 chapters in on Maisie Dobbs by Jacqueline Winspear... so far so good, but set in 1929 so I don't know that it's as "historical" as some might prefer and located in London so I can picture her in the underground which is fun.
 

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So far as I can tell, books by US authors published in the UK retain their US spelling - do UK authors' books keep their UK spelling when published in the US?

I ask as I'm currently reading book 4 in the St Cyr series and I must mention something that continues to strike me as, well, out of place.

So far as I can discover the author is American and the books certainly have US spelling. I read many books by US authors and it normally doesn't bother me in the slightest. But US spelling in a book about 19th century England somehow tends to stand out.

It doesn't really hinder my enjoyment of the books, but I do notice it, especially when it's a less common word. I just came across the word 'plow' (English spelling 'plough') which I'm not sure I've ever seen before and for a moment I had no idea what it meant. In at least one of the previous books in the series the word 'sidewalk' was used instead of 'pavement'.

It seems a shame that the author goes to all the trouble of researching 19th England to get all the details, including the language and dialects correct, but still uses US spelling and words.

Thoughts?



 

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You bring up a good point, Linjeakel.  It seems that in the past I did read books (perhaps by English authors?) that used British words and spelling, but not so much lately.  I'd like to see that occur -- makes sense, really.
 

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Discussion Starter · #355 ·
I am guessing this was done by the publisher for the american audience. I can imagine that being annoying to you. Pavement doesn't really describe a sidewalk in american english. Its more generic for paved things, not just sidewalks. So maybe they were trying to keep confusion at bay. I actually wouldn't mind it being in english instead of american. There are books I read that are written by authors from across the pond and if there is something I am not familiar with, I look it up. I do it all the time. So next time I read it I know.

I am probably too inside the St. Cyr stories to recall really what words were americanized.

I am curious though if that was done originally by the author, or changed by the editor/publisher later.
 

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I don’t know when plough changed to plow. I live in the US and grew up taught to spell it plough. Which made findingthe  plow and hearth website a challenge.

I’ve read an introduction to.... I don’t remember which books, that mentioned “some” of the colloquialism from the UK had been changed for the American audience. That ticked me off no end. I know spelling and slang is often altered, and I want NONE of that. NO ALTERATIONS. If I wanted it to read like I was at home, I’d buy a book set here. If I want to read a book set somewhere in the UK.... leave it alone and let me enjoy the differences, publishers
 

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I don't know that I notice one way or the other. I am pretty much bilingual when it comes to American vs British English.

I will notice if it keeps jumping back and forth -- you know: they talk about wearing sweaters in one chapter and jumpers in the next. The only time that works for me is if there are clearly both American and British characters and they use the words that make sense for who they are.

I guess as long as the overall atmosphere is right, I don't even notice much in 'period pieces'. I've certainly never been distracted by Americanisms in any of the St. Cyr books. And there are definitely period words and phrases -- "tiger" comes to mind immediately, meaning his young groom/carriage boy.
 

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Ann in Arlington said:
.... And there are definitely period words and phrases -- "tiger" comes to mind immediately, meaning his young groom/carriage boy.
You're right, there are any number of period words and phrases like that, many of which are going to be unfamiliar wherever you're from - and I suppose if the author is American she just spells everything else as she's always done. As a British person I just found the use of obviously English historical words like 'nuncheon' and 'jarvey' etc, alongside words like 'plow' 'color', neighborhood' and 'sidewalk' an odd combination.

As I said, normally I hardly notice it with the more common words, but occasionally a less common word will stand out more. I think I only noticed it here because it's a clearly historical English setting. It doesn't stop me from enjoying the books - I just wondered whether any other non-US readers noticed it.
 

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I confess I was unfamiliar with the word "jarvey".  I do wish they used more historical English language, even if I have to look them up.  I find it interesting.  I suppose an author should go with the English spelling, as well, so that it doesn't take British readers out of the story.  I used to read Victoria Holt and Mary Stewart and I think they used English spelling, not American.

On a related topic, I think the English put most punctuation marks outside of quotation marks rather than inside it like we do in America?  The English way makes much more sense to me. 
 

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Trophywife007 said:
On a related topic, I think the English put most punctuation marks outside of quotation marks rather than inside it like we do in America? The English way makes much more sense to me.
Ummm.... no. I think you'll find we put punctuation marks - full stop (period), comma, question mark etc - inside of quotes. I've just randomly picked out a book by a British author and this is a sample:-

'It's lovely,' I said softly, carefully not touching the material. 'The detail is superb. Sadly, it's a bit modern for me.'
That is how I would expect to see dialogue punctuated. Or did you mean something else?
 
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