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We all know about the top self published authors out there, but I was wondering specifically about kid-lit authors, and if anyone knew of any SP authors doing really well with kid titles?
 

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It does seem to be difficult to get traction in the kid-lit genre. My Leon Chameleon PI has just been chosen as one of the award winners for the 2013 KART Kids Book List (27 books chosen out of 2000 submissions). I'm now waiting to see if this does anything for sales ::).

Bheki and the Magic Light was originally published in paperback by Penguin, but since I e-published it sales have been pretty dismal. I suppose the fact that it's set in Africa perhaps doesn't appeal to children in other parts of the world.
 

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Jan Hurst-Nicholson said:
It does seem to be difficult to get traction in the kid-lit genre. My Leon Chameleon PI has just been chosen as one of the award winners for the 2013 KART Kids Book List (27 books chosen out of 2000 submissions). I'm now waiting to see if this does anything for sales ::).

Bheki and the Magic Light was originally published in paperback by Penguin, but since I e-published it sales have been pretty dismal. I suppose the fact that it's set in Africa perhaps doesn't appeal to children in other parts of the world.
I agree it's hard to get traction. I average selling about 10 ebooks a month on Amazon. I've got average sales on Google ebooks, and everyone once in awhile, through Smashwords. Most of my sales are ebooks. I write middle grade novels, and adults can read them. It seems your book does better when it is a crossover, adults and kids can both read it. Harry Potter started this trend. Though, I have to admit, I think some children's books have always done better when adults will enjoy them to a point. If you have two layers, one a child and one an adult will enjoy, it will do better as well.

Plus, awards are ALWAYS good. That seems the way to really get the word out about your book. Any gold seal or bragging rights seem to get people interested. But in general, children's books are hard to sell. I truly think it is a calling to write them. ;D
 

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Gerald Hawksley has a lot of titles that do well. He does his own illustrations. I adore his clever simplicity and cute illustrations. He also writes under Otto Fishblanket.

Michael Yu and his daughter Rachel also have a lot of titles that do well. They put out new books regularly. Their illustrations might be digital, though.
 

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Great topic. And congrats, Jan!  My son  likes a lot of the middle grade ebooks about a Sixth Grade Ninja. The authors have LOTS of books and many are very short. I am not saying that's a good thing. He did fly through several on a sick day.  I just started selling ebooks in Feb. So far I am averaging about 1 every other day for my MG novel. As an experiment I wrote and published a ya prom short story to compare. It's sold way better at almost 60 since March 6. It is also .99 compared to the 2.99 mg book.
 

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MJ Ware has posted here about his experiences and seems to be doing well.

Also, the group of authors/illustrators that did the following book have a ton of books out that look to be doing well (including the ninja books that Marcy mentioned):
 

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Thanks, Steven. I personally like the simple, cartoon cover images of those books as does my son. I'd love to hear from the authors, but I can't find anything out online.
 

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MarcyBlesy said:
Thanks, Steven. I personally like the simple, cartoon cover images of those books as does my son. I'd love to hear from the authors, but I can't find anything out online.
Totally agree--the covers are terrific. It does not seem like the authors have much, if any, online presence. But then, at the rate they are publishing I am guessing all their time is spent writing/illustrating. They are producing a ton of material. (Relatively short works, but the audience doesn't seem to mind, and things seem to be working out for them)

One other example of SP kid lit that has done well:
 

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I think that being in a niche market/genre is hugely helpful. I write MG/tween fiction for horse crazy girls. My series (currently five books and one boxed set) sell around 1250 ebooks a month, plus 100 print books. I do very little promo (I have a web site, a FB page, but no blog) and I've never done Select or gone free. I price the ebooks at $2.99; print at $6.99.
 

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Patty Jansen said:
Simon Haynes. But he's been self-publishing since before Amazon.

Kid books are hard to sell. I have one (The Far Horizon in sig file), and it's sold OK, but wouldn't call it a bestseller at this point in time.
Thanks Patty, but I wouldn't say my self-pubbed kid lit books have been a success. It's very hard to get physical copies out there (the usual distribution problems), and unlike adult ebooks the market for junior fiction ebooks is still tiny. For that end of the market you need durability (= paperbacks), something you can give as a gift (= paperbacks) and something that looks enticing and readable (= paperbacks)
 

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MarcyBlesy said:
Great topic. And congrats, Jan! My son likes a lot of the middle grade ebooks about a Sixth Grade Ninja. The authors have LOTS of books and many are very short. I am not saying that's a good thing. He did fly through several on a sick day. I just started selling ebooks in Feb. So far I am averaging about 1 every other day for my MG novel. As an experiment I wrote and published a ya prom short story to compare. It's sold way better at almost 60 since March 6. It is also .99 compared to the 2.99 mg book.
The first Leon Chameleon book is priced at 99c and the second one at $2.99, but neither are selling. I am doing a Goodreads Giveaway as well. One of the reviewers loved the books so much that I sent her the draft of the third in the series that didn't even have illustrations and her son drew his own illustrations. She has also been promoting it herself and says that children love the story, so it's disappointing that sales have been poor. I guess I'll just have to wait until it falls into the right lap :)
 
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