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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am receiving my 1st MacBook in 2 days.
It is the new MacBook Pro Model MB470LL/A.
I was wondering if it is hard to learn to use a MacBook, when you've never used one before?

 

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I have the previous model 17" MacBook Pro (the non unibody one from early last summer).

I started out as a Mac user, went to work for Windows-only companies for 15 years, and came back to the Mac after spending some time with my husband's 13" MacBook. They are pretty dramatically different than working on a Vista machine, and it may take some getting used to if you've been using Windows for a long time, but once you've had it for a bit you won't regret it. The only thing I'd do differently is go with the 15" instead of the 17"--I don't do anything that takes advantage of the larger screen, and it's a lot harder to find bags & sleeves that fit the larger computer. :D

 

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New to the MacBook, or Mac OS X in general? Are you a Windows user?

I'm a long-time Mac user and work on a Mac every day. Obviously, I'm completely biased toward the platform ;) OS X is easy to learn, and there's plenty of resources on the web (and Mac Help on your system) for new users. I've pretty much converted my entire family to the Mac Way of Life. Hah :D

The cool thing about MacBooks specifically is that they have a multi-touch trackpad. You can use multiple finger gestures for certain tasks. You use two fingers to scroll through web pages in Safari (or the browser of your choice. Safari is mine). The new MacBooks allow you to use four fingers to control Expose (which is basically a way to organise your windows). There's also pinch to zoom in and out of images (like on the iPhone) and several other gestures you can use.

If there's anything you need to know, just fire away.
 

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I bought my first Mac in 1989.... There is no learning curve. For you it is just a matter of picking the software you need.

Right now, I am running two iMacs and an iBook....  I will be getting a new MacBook Pro this summer.
 

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Sugar said:
I am receiving my 1st MacBook in 2 days.
It is the new MacBook Pro.
I was wondering if it is hard to learn to use a MacBook, when you've never used one before?
It's pretty easy to learn to use one, as long as you don't expect it to do things just like a Windows computer. I believe that there are books around that will show a Windows user how to do things the way the Mac is set up to do them.

BTW, MacBook and MacBook Pro are two different machines.... if you have any questions, it's best to specify which one you have. Operationally they are practically the same, but the hardware is significantly different.

Mike
 

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I've noticed the major differences new Mac users (and previous Windows users) struggle with are:

1) Getting used to the dock & menu bar instead of the Windows task bar. The dock and the Windows task bar have similar functions in that they show you what applications are running and allow you to switch between them, but the dock also acts as a quick launch bar for whatever apps you choose to put in there.

2) Installing applications. Macs don't use executables or installers (.exe files) to install apps. Instead, you'll mostly find disc images (.dmg) which you need to mount by double clicking, and then installing into your Applications folder by dragging and dropping it there. A lot of people fall into the trap of trying to run an app from the mounted dmg, but you do actually have to copy it into the Applications folder. If you ask me, the way you install apps on a Mac is its Achilles heel.

3) Figuring out how to manage your open windows. You can cmd-tab to cycle through open applications. You can also use expose (which works with trackpad gestures) to see all the open windows you have and to move between them very easily. You can also click on the app's icon in the dock to make that the active application.

4) Closing windows vs quitting applications. Unlike Windows, clicking on the red cross in the corner of a Window generally won't quit the application. Instead, it will just close the window but continue running the app. You can open the application's window again by clicking on the icon in the dock, but to actually end the application's process, you need to click on the name of the app in the menu bar and select 'Quit'. Alternatively, press cmd + Q.

5) Shutdown vs sleep. Macs are built so that you don't have to shut them down if you don't want to. You can keep everything in a saved state and just put it into sleep mode (kind of like the Kindle). When you wake it up again, everything is the same as you left it. With a MacBook, you need only shut the lid and it will automatically go to sleep (something many PC laptops struggle with, oddly).

Macs are a lot more visually engaging and intuitive compared to windows, in my opinion. If something's happening, you'll generally see a visual indication of it. And in general, the way you *think* you would accomplish something on a Mac is usually the way you're supposed to do it. OS X's UI is closer to invisible than any other OS I've used (that's a good thing).
 

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I have the macbook air...love it and it is my first mac.  DS is getting a macbook pro for graduation. we are replacing our PC's as they die with mac.  no going back for me. Hope you enjoy your new computer.
 

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I also have a Macbook Pro that I use at home.  I use Windoze at work.  I can hardly wait to get home in the evening to get to my Macbook.  You'll love the Macbook Pro, believe me.
 

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In my other life I used macs and pc's interchangeable, and when I retired I got a pc because mac's were just a tad expensive on a very limited income, however, I found the mac-mini and have not looked back since then.  I am saving my pennies (ok pesos) for a macbook, and who knows maybe this summer - fingers crossed  :D :D :D  Teaching my DH the computer has been a test, but so glad we have a mac!
 

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No, it is really easy. I used computers with Windows for years and now I have a 13 inch Macbook AND a lovely IMac with a fantastic flat screen.

The hardest part was getting into the habit of going to the top LEFT to close a screen! If I can help you with anything along the lines of "How do you do...?" please don't hesitate to PM me and I will be happy to help.

patrisha

 

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I bought my first Mac a couple of months ago, a MacBook Pro. It was an end of life sale for half price. I do love it, and I even used to work for Dell. The single most helpful website I have found is http://www.myfirstmac.com/. The best tip on there (so far) was setting up right-click.

I bought the one-to-one service, and I haven't used it much because the Apple store is not located that close to where I live. I did go there to get help setting up my aircard. I live in a rural area where there is no cable, and the satellite service is weak. The person helping me at Apple had a lot of difficulty getting me on the internet with my aircard. I haven't been back for more training, but I do think it would help.

One of the biggest problems I am having is that I have a website that was set up in FrontPage. I know I need to switch to something else; FrontPage is clunky and no longer available. So, I am still having to go back to my PC at least once a week to update my website. I am really busy and lack the motivation to spend a lot of time learning a new web program right now.

All in all, I love my MacBook. I am still experiencing some difficulty using iWork instead of Office with my old spreadsheets. The online tutorials are helpful, and I think if I could find time to go back to the one-to-one training that would help a lot.

It does take some getting used to. The delete key works like the backspace key. Navigation can be a little frustrating, especially at first, and also because I go back and forth between my Mac and my old PC when updating my website.

 

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Jan and I both have MacBook Pros that we got last year. Before that I was a "Windoze" user since...well, since before Windows existed. I've also used Unix, Linux, and a variety of other OS's and hardware.

But I have to say that my only regret has been that we didn't get Macs sooner. If I knew way back when what I know now, I would have converted a long time ago. The OS itself (which is now based on a UNIX core - that sold me right there) is vastly superior, and once you get used to it the interface is just much more user-friendly.

As some of the other folks noted, you will encounter transition issues and problems, so be prepared to unlearn/relearn some things and to weather a bit of frustration. But once you clear those hurdles, I think you'll be very happy with it.

And if you have Windows software that you absolutely have to have, you can get software called Parallels or VMWare (which is the one I use) that will let you run Windows programs very easily (you just need a copy of whatever Windows OS you want to use). In fact, for the programs I needed to keep, they actually run better on my Mac with VMWare than they did on my Windows machines. Go figure.

Also, do yourself a huge favor: make an appointment with a personal shopper at your local Apple store if you have one. We did that, and the guy spent a full two hours with us in the store going over everything. That was extremely helpful in getting started.

Enjoy!  ;D
 

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kreelanwarrior said:
And if you have Windows software that you absolutely have to have, you can get software called Parallels or VMWare (which is the one I use) that will let you run Windows programs very easily (you just need a copy of whatever Windows OS you want to use). In fact, for the programs I needed to keep, they actually run better on my Mac with VMWare than they did on my Windows machines. Go figure.
Seconded. I use Bootcamp (which comes with OS X Leopard) to set up another partition for Windows XP (used mostly to play games). I've found that the best Windows PC is a Mac. :D

There's also a completely free virtualisation app called VirtualBox: http://www.virtualbox.org/
No need to spend your pennies on VMWare Fusion / Parallels if you don't need all the added extra features.
 

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reemixx said:
There's also a completely free virtualisation app called VirtualBox: http://www.virtualbox.org/
No need to spend your pennies on VMWare Fusion / Parallels if you don't need all the added extra features.
Thank for the tip on that! I'll have to check that out, although I've gotten to the point now that I very rarely use any of the old Windows apps (thankfully)... ;D
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Some additional information :)
Yes I am Windows user,and my other laptop and my desktop both run Vista( and I have had no problems with it).
So yep Windows is what I am used to using.
As to which MacBook it is the MacBook Pro 15.4 inch model MB470LL/A.Which is the newest MacBook Pro.
I know absolutely nothing of the Mac OS ,aside from years back my 1st computer was a Macintosh,I then got my 1st Windows computer,mostly due to Mac's small software offerings at the time.
It arrives tomorrow and I am mostly excited,with a bit of nervousness about learning a new OS.
I will definitely come back and post with questions,and I thank you all for your posts and offers of help :)
You all are the best :)

 

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LilliPilli said:
All in all, I love my MacBook. I am still experiencing some difficulty using iWork instead of Office with my old spreadsheets.
You might want to take a look at Open Office instead of going with iWork. It's free and very powerful. And file compatible.

http://why.openoffice.org/
http://download.openoffice.org/other.html

It works a lot more like MS Office and it's just as powerful. I think it's easier to use.

Mike
 

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Yep, I switched last year and could kick myself for not doing it sooner. I saved so much time in not having to baby Windows or tinker with it or beg it to work or deal with the inevitable bogging down after 1-2 years of use that I got with Windows. If I had to give up my Mac I would switch to Ubuntu/Linux before going back to Windows.

I second OpenOffice...I can't imagine paying for an office suite when this one is so good!
 

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reemixx said:
Seconded. I use Bootcamp (which comes with OS X Leopard) to set up another partition for Windows XP (used mostly to play games). I've found that the best Windows PC is a Mac. :D

There's also a completely free virtualisation app called VirtualBox: http://www.virtualbox.org/
No need to spend your pennies on VMWare Fusion / Parallels if you don't need all the added extra features.
I really need to work my way through setting one of these up; I've still got software on the PC that I need to either migrate over or rebuy in the Mac version.

On the other hand, the whole reason I moved to the Mac was because I despise Vista. And I kinda tend to doubt I'm going to be able to find XP discs at this point. :D
 

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LilliPilli said:
One of the biggest problems I am having is that I have a website that was set up in FrontPage. I know I need to switch to something else; FrontPage is clunky and no longer available. So, I am still having to go back to my PC at least once a week to update my website. I am really busy and lack the motivation to spend a lot of time learning a new web program right now.
Give some thought to installing Parallels or Fusion. I have one program that has no Mac equivalent, so I run it in Fusion whenever I need a Windows OS environment. Currently, in addition to MACOS, I run Ubuntu and Windoze, all on my MacBook Pro.

 

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jazzi said:
Give some thought to installing Parallels or Fusion. I have one program that has no Mac equivalent, so I run it in Fusion whenever I need a Windows OS environment. Currently, in addition to MACOS, I run Ubuntu and Windoze, all on my MacBook Pro.
I would usually agree with you, but just to use Microsoft FrontPage? I think being forced to use another piece of software is a good way to get away from that steaming pile of poo. ;D All FrontPage is good for is clogging up the internet with non-standards compliant code which does nothing but bury your site in Google's rankings.

LilliPilli, if you really want a WYSIWYG web editor, there are PLENTY available for the Mac. Hell, the Mac comes with one when you buy it: iWeb. I'm a web developer so I don't spend much time with WYSIWYGs, but I do know there's a bunch of others (I think the favourite amongst most users is RapidWeaver), but there's heaps that are both free and paid. And I'm certain they're all better than FrontPage.

Alternatively, the better option would be to go with a CMS like Wordpress or a WYSIWYG + hosting package at Squarespace (amazing technology, IMO). There are sooooo many options for easy web development out there now. I guarantee you that the end result will be worth having to take the time to learn your way around a new piece of software with a new interface, and the entire internet will thank you for it.
 
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