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I agree with TexasGirl. Test your pages to make sure you don't get bleed, but I've always used fine-point Sharpies that match my cover color and never had a problem. (I have a hot pink Sharpie for signing Codename and an aqua Sharpie for signing Pointe. I'm on the lookout now for a gold Sharpie for signing Pas de Death.)
 

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My biggest problem was learning to sign my pen name so as it didn't look like a drunk third grader had inscribed the book.
 

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Joe_Nobody said:
My biggest problem was learning to sign my pen name so as it didn't look like a drunk third grader had inscribed the book.
Yeah, my own signature is basically two squggly lines with a dot over the first one. As for which pen, I'm in the Gel Pel camp. Love those things. Way smoother lines than a Bic, and not as much chance of a blotch as a Sharpie.
 

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Absolutely -- practice, practice, practice signing your pen name! If by chance you start to sign your real name, you'l have to start over with a new book and you don't want to keep wasting your stock that way. :)
 

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I had the same problem with specialized pens that spilled ink and skipped. Then I went to a crafts store and shelled out two bucks for "Elegant Writer." It's like a Sharpie, but the nib yields a classier script. It's been very reliable.
 

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I write all my short stories by hand with a Parker fountain pen with refillable ink. Earlier I used to write with ordinary black ballpoint pens
and trust me (and I know that I am risking sounding like a snob here): there is a vast difference between the two.

The Parker pens have different nibs and thickness for a more calligraphy effect and I can really recommend them.
If you can, try visit a shop that specializes in pens and stationary and try out which one that suits you best.
(For example: I have rather long and slender fingers, so I need a fairly large pen and I prefer when they have a little bit of weight.)

Anyway, this is what it looks like:



Good luck!
 

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Lady TL Jennings said:
I write all my short stories by hand with a Parker fountain pen with refillable ink. Earlier I used to write with ordinary black ballpoint pens
and trust me (and I know that I am risking sounding like a snob here): there is a vast difference between the two.

The Parker pens have different nibs and thickness for a more calligraphy effect and I can really recommend them.
If you can, try visit a shop that specializes in pens and stationary and try out which one that suits you best.
(For example: I have rather long and slender fingers, so I need a fairly large pen and I prefer when they have a little bit of weight.)

Anyway, this is what it looks like:



I don't see anything scratched out....That's just nuts. Beautiful though.

Good luck!
 

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Neil Gaiman is quite partial to Waterman fountain pens, for signing books and writing things in general, these days.

I'm quite fond of Sheaffer fountain pens, particularly the Snorkel and Touchdown models, of which I have... many. :)

Half the fun of using a FP, though, is in the ridiculous choice of ink - there are around three-hundred colors currently in production. :eek: (A very small sampling can be found here.)
 

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The Parker T-ball Jotter is the most reliable commercial ball point pen I have ever used.  The ink cartridge lasts forever.  I don't think they are manufactured anymore, though you might be able to find one on Amazon (where else?).  Other pens today--like Pilot--use the T-ball (tungsten) technology invented by Parker.

If you want to dress to impress, you might avail yourself of the space pen replica, which you can order from the Smithsonian Institute.  It's a little short for comfort; however, the ink is pressurized to the extent that it writes flawlessly upside down, a requirement for astronauts in zero gravity.  This means you can sign your books lying down...or do a book signing in space.
 

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Hudson Owen said:
If you want to dress to impress, you might avail yourself of the space pen replica, which you can order from the Smithsonian Institute. It's a little short for comfort; however, the ink is pressurized to the extent that it writes flawlessly upside down, a requirement for astronauts in zero gravity. This means you can sign your books lying down...or do a book signing in space.
You can actually get them just about anywhere - even Amazon.
 

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Lady TL Jennings said:
I write all my short stories by hand with a Parker fountain pen with refillable ink. Earlier I used to write with ordinary black ballpoint pens
and trust me (and I know that I am risking sounding like a snob here): there is a vast difference between the two.

The Parker pens have different nibs and thickness for a more calligraphy effect and I can really recommend them.
If you can, try visit a shop that specializes in pens and stationary and try out which one that suits you best.
(For example: I have rather long and slender fingers, so I need a fairly large pen and I prefer when they have a little bit of weight.)

Anyway, this is what it looks like:



Good luck!
I can't stop looking at this, it's so pretty
 

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You guys are seriously making me think my 0.05 G2 Pilots aren't quite as nice as I thought. I mean sure they write smooth and dry quick (very important for lefties), but they're not terribly fancy. That's ok, I'll use the cheap every day pens and just drool at your signers :p

Also I'm glad to see your doing well enough to even need to consider this question Ms. Dark, I've got your 3 Mageri books and love them.
 

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Dustin Metzger said:
That's ok, I'll use the cheap every day pens and just drool at your signers :p
Just to be clear, while I have four paperbacks out, I've never signed a single book, and have no intention of ever doing so. I just write with neat pens 'cause, um, they're neat. :)

Somebody makes a not-very-expensive rollerball pen that accepts standard fountain pen ink. Could be fun for folks who like a little flair in their life. (Private Reserve's "Black Cherry" ink is a dead ringer for human blood, FWIW. Not that there are any horror writers here who'd enjoy the chance to be awesomely creepy, or anything.) Oh, and there's a French company that makes perfumed inks, too...
 

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George Berger said:
Neil Gaiman is quite partial to Waterman fountain pens, for signing books and writing things in general, these days.

I'm quite fond of Sheaffer fountain pens, particularly the Snorkel and Touchdown models, of which I have... many. :)

Half the fun of using a FP, though, is in the ridiculous choice of ink - there are around three-hundred colors currently in production. :eek: (A very small sampling can be found here.)
Don't they leak or drop blots? I'd love to try them, but I figured they must be messy and, by that, risky.
 

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I love a very fine pen for writing. My favorite is a 0.25. But I just love the spidery thin script that my handwriting becomes with it. I was writing notes in class one day, and the guy behind me (stadium seating for the class) looked over my shoulder and said, "Wow you have nice handwriting, Looks like you enjoy calligraphy." I said that I did enjoy doing calligraphy and that yes, doing it well, meant that my own handwriting had improved drastically.
 
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